Sattumuksia Brooklynissa ePUB ↠


Sattumuksia Brooklynissa [PDF / Epub] ☀ Sattumuksia Brooklynissa ✍ Paul Auster – Thomashillier.co.uk Paul Auster s on kirjoittanut romaaneja, muistelmia, esseit , runoja ja elokuvak sikirjoituksia Austerin kirjallinen kuuluisuus alkoi luvun puoliv liss julkaistusta New York trilogiasta ja t t nyky Paul Auster son kirjoittanut romaaneja, muistelmia, esseit , runoja ja elokuvak sikirjoituksia Austerin kirjallinen kuuluisuus alkoiluvun puoliv liss julkaistusta New York trilogiasta ja t t nyky h n on yksi Yhdysvaltain arvostetuimmista kirjailijoistaNathan Glass vet ytyy Brooklyniin odottamaan kuolemaa Aikansa kuluksi h n kirjoittaa muistiin ihmisille sattuneita ihmeellisi tapahtumia, joista h n aikoo koota Ihmisel m n mielett myyden kirjanMutta kohta Nathan saa huomata, ett h nkin voi kokea ihmeellisi tapahtumia Kaikki alkaa siit , kun h n t rm pitk st aikaa sisarenpoikaansa Tom Woodiin, jonka el m on suistunut raiteiltaan Tomin kautta Nathan tutustuu Harry Brightmaniin, jonka tarina on v rikkyydess n vailla vertaa Seuraavaksi Tomin ja Nathanin luo tupsahtaa sukulaistytt , joka ei suostu puhumaan He yritt v t toimittaa tyt n muiden sukulaisten hoiviin, mutta matka saa odottamattomia k nteitNathanin ymp rille kertyy v hitellen monilukuinen rakastava perhe Erakoitumisen sijaan h n on el m ss kiinni tiukemmin kuin koskaan ennen Sattumuksia Brooklynissa on yksinkertaisesti loistava kun sen laskee k sist n, mielen valtaa selitt m t n hyv nolontunne Jukka Pet j , Helsingin Sanomat.

    Sattumuksia Brooklynissa ePUB ↠ nolontunne Jukka Pet j , Helsingin Sanomat."/>
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 363 pages
  • Sattumuksia Brooklynissa
  • Paul Auster
  • Finnish
  • 14 September 2019
  • 9513150917

About the Author: Paul Auster

Paul Auster is the bestselling author of Report from the Interior, Winter Journal, Sunset Park, Invisible, The Book of Illusions, and The New York Trilogy, among many other works He has been awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize for Literature, the Prix M dicis tranger, the Independent Spirit Award, and the Premio Napoli He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Commandeur de l Ordre des Arts et des Lettres He lives in Brooklyn, New York.



10 thoughts on “Sattumuksia Brooklynissa

  1. Annet Annet says:

    Wasn t sure whether I d like Auster, but I enjoyed this book about NYC I can see Al Pacino doing the main part in a future movie Now I still have the Book of Illusions on my shelf waiting for me to pick it up

  2. Maciek Maciek says:

    Paul Auster s The brooklyn Follies presents a stark contrast to the first work of his that I ve read, The New York Trilogy although the majority of it takes place in New York, the two are different as night and day Novels that comprise The New York Trilogy have been largely experimental, post modern cat and mouse between the author and the reader The Brooklyn Follies is a novel with a pretty straightforward but nevertheless compelling plot and characters one can care about As the title sugge Paul Auster s The brooklyn Follies presents a stark contrast to the first work of his that I ve read, The New York Trilogy although the majority of it takes place in New York, the two are different as night and day Novels that comprise The New York Trilogy have been largely experimental, post modern cat and mouse between the author and the reader The Brooklyn Follies is a novel with a pretty straightforward but nevertheless compelling plot and characters one can care about As the title suggests, it is a novel about folly what follies do we put ourselves in, voluntarily or not, and what are their consequences.The protagonist and narrator is a man named Nathan Glass, a 60 year old ex insurance salesman, who went through lung cancer and has recently became a divorcee, has sort of given up on life and wants to calmly wait it out until its end, spending the savings he has attained Looking for a quiet place to die, upon someone s recommendation he moves back to Brooklyn, the place he kept returning to, as he lived there as a child While browsing the area, Nathan Wood encounters his newhew, Tom, once a promising academician, now a former cab driver and a current used book store employee He introduces Nathan to his boss, Harry Duncan, a character with a colorful past, who still has a few schemes and plans up his sleeve To pass the time, Nathan began a project of his own The Book of Human Folly an accounts of mishaps and mistakes, which as the title suggest might have ended as the text of the very novel we re reading.Starting with a wish to die, The Brooklyn Follies slowly moves up towards the will to live Reading the novel is a journey, during which we witness the transformation of the characters their redemption and reconfirmation, regaining of life The tone is muchjovial than the one of The New York Trilogy and the characters often end up in mishap and folly but there is poignancy, a sense of place and time, a community before the 9 11 attacks, peacefulness and ordinariness The plot is captivating and the drama is real to saywould be to spoil it The characters are colorful and the book never drags in fact, I wouldn t mind if it was longer The theme of the book, the folly, is an important one We all are a part of life, and observe it The characters in the novel all have ben lost, resigned or misplaced we observe how they slowly get their lives back, and change from willing to die to wanting to live Perhaps beneath the tiredness and mundanity there is still something worth striving for, and these people have taken their chances.Although not the most original of ideas, the novel is captivating and full of colorful characters The writing is crisp, and the lack of surreal elements and impersonal cold serves greatly to its favor Auster paints his Brooklyn with warm strokes, and gives his characters original and likable personalities the novel is a gentle and tender one, where the reader genuinely cares about the fate of people he s reading about.It s humorous, engaging and inspiring it s human drama done well A good choice to spend several hours, involved in the life of an everyman, his aspirations, dreams, triumphs, failures and hopes At worst, you l put it away and not think much of it at best, it might inspire you and re engage you with everyday activities and make you see them in a different light

  3. Fabian Fabian says:

    An old dude gives a nine year old girl her bath A niece tells her uncle about her own personal experiences with oral sex Yuck That there is an urge to be risque makes the conservative, too quick to be astonished writer a humongous dud in this instance.Only when tackling meta terrains is this esteemed writer of ANY practical use.

  4. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Brooklyn Follies, Paul AusterThe Brooklyn Follies is a 2005 novel by Paul Auster 60 year old Nathan Glass returns to Brooklyn after his wife has left him He is recovering from lung cancer and is looking for a quiet place to die In Brooklyn he meets his nephew, Tom, whom he has not seen in several years Tom has seemingly given up on life and has resigned himself to a string of meaningless jobs as he waits for his life to change They develop a close friendship, entertaining each other i The Brooklyn Follies, Paul AusterThe Brooklyn Follies is a 2005 novel by Paul Auster 60 year old Nathan Glass returns to Brooklyn after his wife has left him He is recovering from lung cancer and is looking for a quiet place to die In Brooklyn he meets his nephew, Tom, whom he has not seen in several years Tom has seemingly given up on life and has resigned himself to a string of meaningless jobs as he waits for his life to change They develop a close friendship, entertaining each other in their misery, as they both try to avoid taking part in life 2008 1386 357 9789643692957 21

  5. Oriana Oriana says:

    Oh hey look, another book by a pompous old white man peopled almost entirely by pompous white men holding forth on existence and the meaning of life and the inner workings of the mind and their own bloated legacies and women as playthings and agents of growth.Is this what Paul Auster is always like I think the only other of his books I ve ever read is the graphic novel adaptation of City of Glass, which was about a million years ago Idk man, I mean I didn t hate read this exactly, but I defini Oh hey look, another book by a pompous old white man peopled almost entirely by pompous white men holding forth on existence and the meaning of life and the inner workings of the mind and their own bloated legacies and women as playthings and agents of growth.Is this what Paul Auster is always like I think the only other of his books I ve ever read is the graphic novel adaptation of City of Glass, which was about a million years ago Idk man, I mean I didn t hate read this exactly, but I definitely knew by p 20 that I was going to be annoyed the whole way through, and I was Barring a few relatively interesting plot surprises, this wasor less insufferable from start to finish

  6. Mel Mel says:

    Great story about Nathan, his nephew, a little girls and a bookshop Read while in Switzerland.

  7. Sharon Hart-Green Sharon Hart-Green says:

    Brooklyn Follies is a wonderfully entertaining novel, with lively characters and an absorbing plot Like most of the other Auster books I have read, there is some crude language and a few raunchy parts that might not suit all readers.

  8. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Nathan Glass, Fifty nine, retired and divorced who is not normally prone to bouts of self pity, declares his desire to seek a silent end to my sad and ridiculous life the same Nathan Glass who is writing a book dedicated to his life s collection of verbal flubs, physical mishaps, failed ideas and social gaffs Auster s postmodern idea s are built around a host of such recurrent themes, identity and feeling lost in the world, Auster s prose here is nothing new, but that s a good thing Sharp, Nathan Glass, Fifty nine, retired and divorced who is not normally prone to bouts of self pity, declares his desire to seek a silent end to my sad and ridiculous life the same Nathan Glass who is writing a book dedicated to his life s collection of verbal flubs, physical mishaps, failed ideas and social gaffs Auster s postmodern idea s are built around a host of such recurrent themes, identity and feeling lost in the world, Auster s prose here is nothing new, but that s a good thing Sharp, simple and compelling I warmed to Nathan immediately, urbane and funny, but also insecure and generous He has moved from the suburbs to Brooklyn and claims he doesn t wish to last the year, whilst also trying to write a book, He grows to love its vitality and endless possibilities, and for chance connections He doesn t really want to die, probably just bored But a re acquaintance with his nephew Tom, would lead to a friendship he least expected, he and Nathan share long conversations about the nature of things Tom s nine year old niece Lucy turns up out of the blue, refusing to speak Suddenly these three bridge a gap from their past lives and help each other with the possibility of reclaiming hope Tom and Nathan take her on a car trip and fatefully escape a crash the bookshop owner dies, leaving it to Tom Nathan rescues Aurora Lucy s mother from a lunatic husband Nathan, Tom and Aurora get girlfriends This could only be Auster, it s oddly compelling pretty much all the way through, Because he is simply such a gifted storyteller, whether things are slightly bizarre is irrelevant, he draws you into a world you don t want to leave, with characters to warm the soul The Brooklyn Follies was a pleasure to read, but it does carry a sense of literary coasting It is strong on set pieces ans conversation, but as the story gathers pace, the thread between these fragments starts to fray There is nothing wrong with being anxious about humankind s ignorance and impotence, but Auster can be too eager to shoehorn in reminders about the randomness of fate, and the effects this has on everyday people A solid Auster novel, not in my view him at his peak, but it s warm humour within the pages was a joy to behold

  9. Terri Terri says:

    I know that there have been mixed reviews of this book I picked it up in the bargain bin and then looked it up onSome loved it Some hated it, saying that their beloved writer had been abducted by aliens and forced to write this book by money grubbing editors They claimed that there was no plot, nothing happened and I looked at the cheesy cover with trepidation thinking that I had spent some hard earned cash on what would amount to a dust collector and could ve spent it on umm, a latt I know that there have been mixed reviews of this book I picked it up in the bargain bin and then looked it up onSome loved it Some hated it, saying that their beloved writer had been abducted by aliens and forced to write this book by money grubbing editors They claimed that there was no plot, nothing happened and I looked at the cheesy cover with trepidation thinking that I had spent some hard earned cash on what would amount to a dust collector and could ve spent it on umm, a latte Anyway, I must be part of the provincial masses because I simply didn t understand the backlash I thought the book was well written and enjoyable, moving along at a clip Yes it did get muddy in parts, and yes, there was a bit of melodrama that could ve been saved for a Merchant Ivory film, but overall I thought the book was good I don t know if I ve lost my literary skill or if those who were writing scathing reviews had expected far too much or something different But the characters were well drawn In fact, I wouldn t have minded if the book was longer There was no lesson, characters were flawed but not charicatures unless that was the point and I didn t find myself slogging through endless metaphor So all in all I liked it Revoke my English degree if you must, or stone me for not liking one of Auster s premiere works But truthfully, if you re looking for a quick, fun read then pick it up and just take the dust jacket off to avoid any stares from the farliterate critcs at the coffee shop

  10. Donnie Donnie says:

    I d like to give this book 4.5 stars, but goodreads.com fails to strive for precision I really, really, really enjoyed this book The voice and tone of it is so warm and an inviting I loved every character in the book, not so much for their personalities, but rather that Auster portrays each one with so much sensitivity and kindness There is no judgement or scorn in his approach to these people, despite their follies There isn t much of a story here Really, for me, the story occurs on I d like to give this book 4.5 stars, but goodreads.com fails to strive for precision I really, really, really enjoyed this book The voice and tone of it is so warm and an inviting I loved every character in the book, not so much for their personalities, but rather that Auster portrays each one with so much sensitivity and kindness There is no judgement or scorn in his approach to these people, despite their follies There isn t much of a story here Really, for me, the story occurs on the last page, when the events of the book are placed in a context larger than the book itself It makes everything one just read seem less important andimportant at the same time Lately, I have been wondering how I should approach life I mean should one take life seriously, or should we just coast do what s good in the moment And, if I take life seriously, does that cover investing in human beings or does it just mean being an adult, being responsible, learning to stand alone I don t know what the answer is, but this book made me think about itIt would seem that Auster falls on the side of investing in human beings and not taking life too seriously I feel as if he is asking us to put a strong value on retreat, giving in, the victory in flat out survival Every character in the novel is raising some kind of white flag The characters are dashed ephemeral hopes dissolved into concrete daily grinds, and the beauty Auster is trying to portray for us is the gentle pleasure of being ok with defeat It is almost as if he wants us to revel in surrender He shows us that there are rich intimate spaces and deeper connections, perhaps, in a world that is constructed around commiseration than the one we are used to, the one in which we lie about our aspirations, hide our failures, and strive to make something of ourselves I wonder how plausible this world is it does sound and feel very rich and comforting.Everyone fails, and when those around us fail, we somehow tend to love themThe old adage that flaws and imperfections are what make each person unique and beautiful in his or her own ways, is reflected wonderfully in this book Somehow, Auster is asking us to skip that whole part in between failure and others loving us, where we feel shame, embarrassment, and pain in the face of our missteps We have so much to learn from our wrong turns and so much to take in during each fall that we might as well get over ourselves and open up to the world and people around us There is a place that is referred to often in the book, called the hotel existence a place where one can escape the bullshit and miserable aspects of the world we live in, a place where one can retreat to a life less entangled in the morass of the planet The people in the book never get there in a physical sense, but it becomes clear to me that Auster means to say that the hotel existence is bullshit in and of itself There is no true escape from the bullshit Life is fucked It just is There isn t escape there is only the white flag It was an awesome book

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