UnRoman Britain: Exposing the Great Myth of Britannia MOBI



10 thoughts on “UnRoman Britain: Exposing the Great Myth of Britannia

  1. Terence Terence says:

    UnRoman Britain argues that Britain, although it may have been a formal part of the Roman Empire for nearly 400 years, was never fully Roman p 21 Like the British in India or the Americans in Iraq, the Roman occupiers established pockets of their culture and co opted the ruling elites but left the countryside and its people alone Pre Roman Celtic culture survived and re emerged when the legions evacuated c AD 410.Sadly, I ve allowed a backlog of reviews to accumulate on my desk This boo UnRoman Britain argues that Britain, although it may have been a formal part of the Roman Empire for nearly 400 years, was never fully Roman p 21 Like the British in India or the Americans in Iraq, the Roman occupiers established pockets of their culture and co opted the ruling elites but left the countryside and its people alone Pre Roman Celtic culture survived and re emerged when the legions evacuated c AD 410.Sadly, I ve allowed a backlog of reviews to accumulate on my desk This book, which I readthan a year ago, is one of them But, based on the notes I took, here are some of the points the authors make Membership in tribal groups was fluid It s a mistake to look at a map of pre Roman Britain with its clearly defined tribes and imagine it reflects a late Iron Age reality After Boudicca s revolt, Rome imposed atraditional provincial government It reorganized existing towns and established others along traditional Graeco Roman lines, although the archaeological evidence indicates that few were very successful at least compared to similar foundations in Gaul and Spain The Graeco Roman pantheon appears to have had little influence outside of urban centers and military foundations While the Romans ruthlessly exploited Wales and Cornwall s mineral wealth, there s little evidence that that bounty found its way into the island s economy Not surprisingly, most of the evidence for Romanization is found in the south and east, the coasts nearest the mainland and most tightly integrated in the empirewide economy By contrast with Gaul the British aristocracy seem to have remained insular and uninterested in joining the imperial power structures right to the end p 178 After the legions left, Roman culture disappears from the archaeological record no coins, no building, no manufacturies, no villas This can t be attributed to the Anglo Saxons as they didn t arrive until after 450 The authors posit several reasons for this 1 Rapid fragmentation into pre Roman tribal polities There was no self identification as British, unlike Gaul or Spain, where distinct Germanic kingdoms arose 2 There was no well established Christian presence that might have mitigated the effects of the secular government s disappearance 3 As the book hopes to show, what Romanization there was, was a thin veneer, easily cast aside The final chapter of the book looks at Celtic Britain s transformation into Anglo Saxon England A processthorough and far quicker than Romanization despite indications that the number of Anglo Saxon immigrants was very low 100,000 Again, the authors offer some reasons for this 1 Anglo Saxon culture was similar to Celtic, muchso than Rome s 2 Anglo Saxons were infiltrating a country where ancient traditions were at a low ebb the Romans had invaded at a high water mark for Celtic civilization 3 Because of the limited number of Anglo Saxons, it s likely they married British women evident linguistically in Old English, which owes much to Celtic dialects, especially its syntax , and succeeding generations were raised in a hybrid culture 4 Roman culture was in decline, discredited 5 And, though limited as noted above, Anglo Saxon immigration was still far greater than Roman.The authors don t discount Romanization but argue that its influence in Britain was far less than previously thought Romanization is not a myth but it was never a conscious policy of any republican or imperial government Rome imposed a distinctive order wherever it held sway and, in some cases, they transformed the region Gaul Spain , in others, the Roman veneer was swiftly thrown off Britain.Turning aside from the content of the book, physically, it s an impressive volume Russell and Laycock have provided numerous photos many in color , drawings, maps and diagrams that illustrate British lifestyles and the paucity of Roman influences.This is definitely a book I would recommend The issue of tribal identification is a fascinating study in itself, and I would recommend Peter Heather and Walter Goffart, among others, for those interested in recent research into the matter For the interested, John McWhorter s Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue The Untold Story of English, which I reviewed several years ago, offers a brief but fascinating explanation for this


  2. Rupert Matthews Rupert Matthews says:

    This is a good, solid well researched book on Roman Britain It takes a fresh look at the evidence and comes to some novel conclusions I am not sure I agree with everything he says, but it is all interesting You do need to have a bit of basic background knowledge to get the most from this book A great read.


  3. Brian Turner Brian Turner says:

    I came to this book with high expectations, only to find myself disappointed Firstly, it s a short book with only ten chapters Secondly, the book is an uneven mix of tabloid tirades and archaeological insight frankly, much of this book is nothingthan a rant, and much of the archaeology that is actually discussed adds little depth to the argument despite the slogan of UnRoman Britain that the authors repeatedly assert.Even worse is that because this is a short book so much is missed I came to this book with high expectations, only to find myself disappointed Firstly, it s a short book with only ten chapters Secondly, the book is an uneven mix of tabloid tirades and archaeological insight frankly, much of this book is nothingthan a rant, and much of the archaeology that is actually discussed adds little depth to the argument despite the slogan of UnRoman Britain that the authors repeatedly assert.Even worse is that because this is a short book so much is missed there s no real discussion of changes that would have affected many ordinary people in Britain, such as new tools, new crops, and new diseases Additionally, the subjects for actual discussion are brief and far between with some surprising omissions, such as nothing at all mentioned about the missing ninth legion, or much discussion of the limited of town development through the second century which would surely be a key argument.All of which result in a frustrating book that spends too much time with angry posturing, and too little time creating a narrative that matters There could have been a wonderful and in depth argument made about how Roman culture may or may not have touched people in Britain in different ways, but instead this book is an opportunity lost.There are some useful points of reference in it, but overall this book veers repeatedly between trying to be populist and trying to be academic, and it never really finds a decent balance between both The result is a study that lacks depth and fails to properly justify it s own argument


  4. Mictter Mictter says:

    El t tulo del libro lo dice todo la ocupaci n romana de Britannia fue culturalmente muy superficial, como prueba que en muy poco tiempo desapareciera todo vestigio luego lo revisaron un poco a partir del siglo XVIII y las glorias imperiales.Tiene partes interesantes y por supuesto siempre se aprende algo Mi favorito cuando alguien aprende un idioma nuevo evita meter palabras del suyo materno porque sabe que es un error, pero sigue usando la gram tica de su idioma materno de forma inconscient El t tulo del libro lo dice todo la ocupaci n romana de Britannia fue culturalmente muy superficial, como prueba que en muy poco tiempo desapareciera todo vestigio luego lo revisaron un poco a partir del siglo XVIII y las glorias imperiales.Tiene partes interesantes y por supuesto siempre se aprende algo Mi favorito cuando alguien aprende un idioma nuevo evita meter palabras del suyo materno porque sabe que es un error, pero sigue usando la gram tica de su idioma materno de forma inconsciente Por eso podemos determinar la influencia celta en el idioma anglosaj n que sustituy primero al lat n de las lites y pronto tambi n al idioma del pueblo.Pero se hace largo, demasiado prolijo enumeraciones constantes de tribus y ciudades, supongo que a aden rigor al libro pero se hace duro y un tanto aburrido


  5. Augustus Augustus says:

    I didn t finish this one.The introduction sets out his premise, and I didn t feel I wanted to know all the details, so I took it back to the library after Chapter 3.


  6. Jonathan Jonathan says:

    UnRoman Britain looks at Britain from the pre Roman period to prior to the coming of the Saxons I have been very pleased with the book and should be on the shelf of anyone interested in the period It looks at architectural, archeology finds and language and attempts to prove that Britain was never fully integrated into the Roman Empire The trouble with the book is the current findings almost support this in the eastern and southern parts of the island But those are the areas were the best fi UnRoman Britain looks at Britain from the pre Roman period to prior to the coming of the Saxons I have been very pleased with the book and should be on the shelf of anyone interested in the period It looks at architectural, archeology finds and language and attempts to prove that Britain was never fully integrated into the Roman Empire The trouble with the book is the current findings almost support this in the eastern and southern parts of the island But those are the areas were the best finds are located In Cornwall and Wales the physical materials are weaker, but those are the areas most likely to be less Roman Overall it is a good attempt and will start a lot of conversations amongst those interested in Britain


  7. Joan Joan says:

    Compelling revisionist history presenting current archaeological, linguistic, and scientific thought on the 400 year period of Roman presence in Britain If I have a quibble it would be linguistic although there is discussion of current linguistic theory on the Celtic roots of Early AS English I don t think the authors sufficiently explained that thinking, and there is some fudging going on with that pesky language geography spread thing That notwithstanding, the economic, historic, and archae Compelling revisionist history presenting current archaeological, linguistic, and scientific thought on the 400 year period of Roman presence in Britain If I have a quibble it would be linguistic although there is discussion of current linguistic theory on the Celtic roots of Early AS English I don t think the authors sufficiently explained that thinking, and there is some fudging going on with that pesky language geography spread thing That notwithstanding, the economic, historic, and archaeological arguments are solid To summarize, Roman Britain not so Roman after all


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UnRoman Britain: Exposing the Great Myth of Britannia [Download] ➻ UnRoman Britain: Exposing the Great Myth of Britannia Author Miles Russell – Thomashillier.co.uk When we think of Roman Britain we tend to think of a land of togas and richly decorated palaces with Britons happily going about their much improved daily business under the benign gaze of Rome This i When we think of Roman Britain we tend Exposing the Epub Û to think of a land of togas and richly decorated palaces with Britons happily going about their much improved daily business under the benign gaze of Rome This image is to a great extent a fiction In fact, Britons were some of the least enthusiastic members of the Roman Empire A few adopted UnRoman Britain: PDF/EPUB or Roman ways to curry favor with the invaders A lot never adopted a Roman lifestyle at all and remained unimpressed and driven by deep seated tribal division It wasn t until the late third early fourth century that a small minority of landowners grew fat on the benefits of trade and enjoyed the kind of lifestyle we have been taught to associate Britain: Exposing the Kindle Õ with the period Britannia was a far away province which, whilst useful for some major economic reserves, fast became a costly and troublesome concern for Rome, much like Iraq for the British government today Huge efforts by the state to control the hearts and minds of the Britons were met with at worst hostile resistance and rebellion, and at best by steadfast indifference The end of the Roman Empire largely came as business as usual for the vast majority of Britons as they simply hadn t adopted the Roman way of life in the first place.