The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves,


10 thoughts on “The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters

  1. Rabbit {Paint me like one of your 19th century gothic heroines!} Rabbit {Paint me like one of your 19th century gothic heroines!} says:

    Easy reading while dropping facts Perfect.


  2. B Schrodinger B Schrodinger says:

    This book is ascholarly look at wave production and dynamics While it is light on the physics, it is heavy on the general details Every example of the types of waves and storms is illustrated to minute detail with references given Some people may not be able to deal with this level of detail, but I did not mind it It makes a great change from some general science books that make broad innacurate statements.Parker s extensive experience with the subject shows, and it is no surprise to r This book is ascholarly look at wave production and dynamics While it is light on the physics, it is heavy on the general details Every example of the types of waves and storms is illustrated to minute detail with references given Some people may not be able to deal with this level of detail, but I did not mind it It makes a great change from some general science books that make broad innacurate statements.Parker s extensive experience with the subject shows, and it is no surprise to read of his credentials at the end of the book You will not find adefinitive yet accessible book on the subject.A large section of the book discusses the Boxing Day 2004 earthquake and tsunami events It is interesting to discover the lack of tsunami detection and monitoring in the Indian Ocean before this event Only the Pacific was afforded this mainly due to the input of U.S military.Overall, great yet dense read


  3. Will Ristow Will Ristow says:

    Will RistowCitation Parker, Bruce B The Power of the Sea Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict the Sea s Moments of Destruction Palgrave Macmillan, 2010 The Power of the Sea by Bruce Parker utilizes several arguments to illuminates how powerful the ocean continues to be in influences life on Earth This includes the illustrating how human history of struggle to understand the mechanics behind the ocean and how disasters became comprehensible through scientific inquir Will RistowCitation Parker, Bruce B The Power of the Sea Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict the Sea s Moments of Destruction Palgrave Macmillan, 2010 The Power of the Sea by Bruce Parker utilizes several arguments to illuminates how powerful the ocean continues to be in influences life on Earth This includes the illustrating how human history of struggle to understand the mechanics behind the ocean and how disasters became comprehensible through scientific inquiry Parker, the former chief scientist of the National Ocean Service, further interweaves stories of unpredicted natural disasters and shows the scientific journey from ancient man s first crude tide predictions to today s advanced early warning ability based on the Global Ocean Observing System GOOS However, the main argument Parker conveys includes that with the ability to predict ocean phenomenon, that humans can escape the ocean s power and avoid unnecessary deaths Despite this, Parker highlights that not all problems can currently be solved and uses examples such as predicting tsunamis, rogue waves, the critical aspects of El Ni o, and questions regarding the role of climate change In analyzing the root causes of oceanic destruction, Parker argues that the energy unleashed by the ocean comes from three sources First, energy from the sun provides heat that is distributed unevenly across the globe, which aids in the creation of storm surges and wind waves 4 The second source of energy comes from the Moon and its tidal impact He does an acceptable job in providing this background information within the underlying roots of energy within tidal forces and waves Although this may seem rudimentary by most geographic standards, knowing the energy budget that is distributed and utilized in the world s oceans remains essential Since energy changes form and does not disappear, understanding the amount of energy that is transferred into the processes that humans observe has implications regarding the nature of the ocean This book also does a great job of explaining definitions without taking away from the story elements Parker incorporates For example, seasoned oceanographers may recognize a SLOSH model, but for the general population and myself, Parker uses brief and effective wordings to illustrate these systems that have changed over time By defining the meaning, date of creation, and background of respective terms, Parker effectively provides insight for the reader For instance, when defining SLOSH, he states that it stands for sea, lake, and overland surges from hurricanes while also highlighting that it was first developed in the late 1960 s and was greatly improved following Hurricane Camille 91 Parker repeats this process in with a variety of terms, which both helps to educate the reader and help them to interpret this new knowledge through historical examples This ties in to the large usage of history in the progression of learning the elements within the oceans A pattern I found that correlates with Parker s section history of progression on knowledge about the ocean includes how large amount experience on tides and oceanic processes came from military exploits Throughout the first two chapters in the book, Parker illuminates that military landings have been essential in attempts to determine the effects of the tide Parker illustrates that these lessons of the power of the seas date back to Caesar, the middle ages, and especially for the various amphibious landings throughout World War Two there is a entire chapter dedicated to the D Day landings The element of human struggle in understanding the impact of the tides created consequences, which according to this book, has made knowledge on oceanic processes imperative for nation states and armies historically Parker does an excellent job of using examples such as Caesar s invasion of England, Napoleon s encounter in the Red sea, D Day and the inventions that led to the systems people use today One of these inventions that incorporated by Parker included recognition of wind waves that decided the Battle of Salamis in 480 BC 101 Through knowing how the channeled strait creates larger waves off the island of Salamis was then utilized by Pericles and the Greek navy to defeat the Persians and change world history In a similar fashion, Parker also showed that the Munk Sverdrup formula was created by oceanographers during World War two to calculate wave conditions for amphibious landings, and not initially for civilian or practical use Although Parker does not illustrate this in the book, I think that acknowledging the role of military innovations in the oceanic monitoring methods needs to be done Although this does not correlate with all oceanic terms or progress, many of the systems used today such as the Global Ocean Observing System are relatives of the precursors created as a byproduct of conflict This book illustrates various oceanic constructs in a creative manner that incorporates history of human knowledge Through the utilization of gradual expansion on previous oceanic views, Parker illuminates that the oceanic processes have taken thousands of years to comprehend Further, Parker argues that there are still processes unknown to man and cannot fully be explained such as rogue waves and tsunamis In chapter four titled Defending Our Coasts , Parker uses this chapter to illustrate and advocate for better storm warning systems to inform and prevent deaths from storm surges and hurricanes in coastal areas across the globe Also, this chapter starkly illustrates the consequences for not having these vital warning systems with tragic losses that occurred in Galveston, Texas in a 1900 hurricane and repeatedly in the areas surrounding the Bay of Bengal Despite this, one argument that can be made against Parker includes the consistent human encroachment near the oceans Since a large percentage of the Earth s population lives on the coast, oceanic changes in sea level and severity will continue to have a proportional impact on human life If people truly wanted to limit the extent of death and destruction by the sea, then there would be less development along the coast I realize that this trend does not seem extremely rational, as marine climate remain moderated in temperature and hold most of the world s largest cities However, I believe this book should delve into this problem as coastal populations rise along with increases in water levels and storm severity While Parker illuminates growing problems that climate change and other possibilities may have, he should further provide solutions or fixes that need to happen within society Since this book demonstrates how humanity historically learned to adapt to problems created by the ocean, it also needs to set people on the right path in finding answers issues in the future Another example from the book that indirectly highlights this point includes the failure of DART buoys in detecting the Japanese submarine Earthquake that broke down the Fukushima nuclear power plant in 2011 Although the NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was notified of the earthquake right away, the buoys deployed in the region were too slow in relaying that a tsunami was coming and reported this information after it smacked the east coast of Japan While these prevention techniques remain helpful, they cannot guarantee success in protecting people living near the coast near fault lines where earthquake are common Overall, The Power of the Sea by Bruce Parker does an excellent job of identifying and explaining how ocean predicting techniques have evolved historically and the processes they have been used to predict Through acknowledging the existence of weather patterns and the struggles by humans to understand them, Parker illustrates the importance in learning and continuing discover the underlying processes that drive the disasters from the seas


  4. Carolyn Carolyn says:

    Some interesting stories, especially about rogue waves and tsunamis But perhaps a littlethan I really wanted to know about the science.


  5. Nicole Nicole says:

    Out of the many scientific books I ve read that are meant for general consumption, this one has so far been on of the best It hit the balance of scientific data and good writing well, and didn t fall into the trap of dense scientific language that so many books like it do Overall an extremely enjoyable and interesting read.


  6. Stefanie Stefanie says:

    Hang in there through the first chapter, which is really dense understandably so, as the tide is a very complicated thing to understand and predict The remainder of the book was a much easier go, and I spent a lot of time reading particularly fascinating paragraphs out loud to my family or handing off the book to my husband to read sections pertinent to his interests.


  7. Sophy H Sophy H says:

    Despite being hugely interested in the the subject matter, I found this book terribly tedious and its writing style far too dry The only chapters that really engaged me were the two concerning the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami Otherwise I found myself looking to see how many pages I had left to read far too many times Disappointing.


  8. Amy Amy says:

    NF237 pagesThe sea is very complicated A very compelling and informative book.


  9. Kim Zinkowski Kim Zinkowski says:

    A I enjoyed the book and the discussions of the physical manifestations of the sea tided, wind waves and currents, rogue waves and tsunamis.


  10. Text Addict Text Addict says:

    This is a really good book, and I don t say that lightly about nonfiction The subtitle is Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters The good news is, modern technology makes it possible to predict or identify a variety of threats from the sea.The bad news is, it isn t always enough, and may never be Witness the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan The book talks at length about the December 2004 earthquake and tsunami in the Indian Ocean which you may recal This is a really good book, and I don t say that lightly about nonfiction The subtitle is Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters The good news is, modern technology makes it possible to predict or identify a variety of threats from the sea.The bad news is, it isn t always enough, and may never be Witness the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan The book talks at length about the December 2004 earthquake and tsunami in the Indian Ocean which you may recalled killed an estimated 300,000 people.Parker presents his material in a partly chronological and partly topical format, beginning with the development of tide predictions, and the often rather odd theories developed to explain them in the ancient and medieval worlds And I mean worlds he also deals with Chinese civilization s efforts in this and other areas, in a worthy nod to the fact that there have always been thinking beings in the East as well as the West.Did you know that rogue waves out in the ocean can top 90 feet and do in anything from an oil tanker or a luxury ocean liner on down Not to mention occasionally demolishing lighthouses For a long time, it seems, scientists didn t even believe in them And there s currently no way to predict those.The author nicely balances genuine and well explained scientific information with fascinating, terrifying, and horrifying examples from history Obviously he had to choose from among a plethora of actual or potential disasters, but I think he does a good job.You should read this book if you actually want to understand how dangerous the sea can be, and how important modern computerized research on the ocean really is And Parker also delves into the problem of climate change, if you want to knowabout that, discussing some of the credible potential effects meaning, rising ocean levels and hammering home the importance of maintaining the extensive monitoring of ocean data that has been developing for the last few decades.Maybe not a book you want to invest 28.00 in, but I got it from the library and I m sure you can, too And I know I m a loteducated now than I was before I read it


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The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters ❰Reading❯ ➿ The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters Author Bruce Parker – Thomashillier.co.uk The Power of the Sea describes our struggle to understand the physics of the sea, so we can use that knowledge to predict when the sea will unleash its fury against us In a wide sweeping narrative spa The Power of of the PDF Í the Sea describes our struggle to understand the physics of the sea, so we can use that knowledge to predict when the sea will unleash its fury against us In a wide sweeping narrative spanning much of human history, Bruce Parker, former chief scientist of the National Ocean Service, interweaves thrilling and often moving stories of unpredicted natural disaster with an accessible account of scientific discovery The result is a compelling scientific journey, from ancient man s first crude tide predictions The Power PDF/EPUB or to today s advanced early warning ability based on the Global Ocean Observing System It is a journey still underway, as we search for ways to predict tsunamis and rogue waves and critical aspects of El Ni o and climate change caused by global warming.

  • ebook
  • 304 pages
  • The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters
  • Bruce Parker
  • English
  • 24 January 2019
  • 0230112242

About the Author: Bruce Parker

Is a well of the PDF Í known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters book, this is one of the most wanted Bruce Parker author readers around the world.