The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket MOBI

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket [Epub] ➤ The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket ➥ Edgar Allan Poe – Thomashillier.co.uk After reading an newspaper account of a shipwreck and its two survivors, Edgar Allan Poe penned his only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, the story of a stowaway on a Nantucket After reading of Arthur PDF/EPUB å annewspaper account of a shipwreck and its two survivors, Edgar Allan Poe penned his only novel, The Narrative The Narrative PDF/EPUB ² of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, the story of a stowaway on a Nantucket whaleship who finds himself enmeshed in the Narrative of Arthur Kindle ´ dark side of life at sea mutiny, cannibalism, savagery even death As Jeffrey Meyers writes in his Introduction Poe remains contemporary because he appeals to basic human feelings and expresses universal themes common to all men in all languages dreams, love, loss grief, mourning, alienation terror, revenge, murder insanity, disease, and death Within the pages of this novel, we encounter nearly all of themThis Modern Library Paperback Classic reprints the text of the originalAmerican edition.


10 thoughts on “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket

  1. Richard Richard says:

    Dear The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, I love you I hate you You confuse me because you evoke within me such conflicting emotions The truth I really got into a relationship with you because I thought that you would be a straight up maritime adventure novel a la Master and Commander I heard you inspired Herman Melville when he was writing Moby Dick That s what I was looking for What I got was well, what are you, Arthur Here s the thing, Gordy you were always good as an adventure n Dear The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, I love you I hate you You confuse me because you evoke within me such conflicting emotions The truth I really got into a relationship with you because I thought that you would be a straight up maritime adventure novel a la Master and Commander I heard you inspired Herman Melville when he was writing Moby Dick That s what I was looking for What I got was well, what are you, Arthur Here s the thing, Gordy you were always good as an adventure novel That was your strength and I always liked that about you I liked your gruesome tales of cannibalism, the ship of dead people, the mutiny, the shark attacks, killing a polar bear with a knife and the sprays of blood, etc But then, oh God, there were the parts where you devolved into long passages about nautical terminology For pages and pages you rattled off longitudes and latitudes and the way the sea currents were running I almost left you then You were elegant as hell, but I was bored off my ass Stick to the action, Arthur, I wanted to say, If I wanted a travelogue I d read The Voyage of the Beagle If I wanted a treatise about the nesting habits of frigate birds I d pick up a Time Life book or check out Wikipedia I feel like you are trying to be all things to all people, Arthur I think this has to do with your origins, how you were published episodically in a newspaper and had to appeal a variety of readers And while I admire your versatility, I think you should just stick to who you really are, deep down an adventure novel Or maybe, again, that s just who I wanted you to be and I m projecting my expectations on you If you feel smothered by me, that s fine And you are a racist son of a bitch, too All the black guys are either mutineers or knuckle dragging savages Come on Arthur, I m sorry it didn t work out I wanted to love you so bad I want to compare you other lovers your lost civilizations reminded me of Borges, your castaways reminded me of Robert Louis Stevenson, you seem at times like you could ve been a pulp novel penned in the early twentieth century all swashbuckle and edge of your seat adventure But I just can t look past your flaws And maybe that s my fault I think our age difference is a chasm between us You come from different generation I can t help but judge you by my modern standards of tolerance and post Hemingway appreciation for strong, brief sentences and that s not fair to either of us I m sure there s a better reader out there for you, somewhere, Arthur We had some good times this past week and a half, but I m glad to move on I m eager to start a relationship with another book Me and Raymond Chandler have been seeing each other lately, and I think I might pursue that a little I m eager to start a new chapter in my reading life sorry for the pun Don t take any of this personally Again it s not you, Arthur It s me.Sincerely,Richard PorterP.S Bad ass cover, BTW


  2. Sr3yas Sr3yas says:

    Poe s only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is not your average 19th century adventure tale like those of Jules Verne or Robert Louis Stevenson. Instead, it s a type of tale which acts as a forefather for many tales to come and it s a hell of a weird ride The narrative introduces Augustus and our narrator, Arthur Gordon Pym The first chapter tells a drunken adventure of these two boys Not sure why that chapter is there, but it s there.The next couple of chapters tells on Poe s only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is not your average 19th century adventure tale like those of Jules Verne or Robert Louis Stevenson. Instead, it s a type of tale which acts as a forefather for many tales to come and it s a hell of a weird ride The narrative introduces Augustus and our narrator, Arthur Gordon Pym The first chapter tells a drunken adventure of these two boys Not sure why that chapter is there, but it s there.The next couple of chapters tells one of the best sea adventures I ve read in a long time As Augustus and his father decided to set sail for open ocean, Pym decides to join them anonymously with help of his friend Well, things went south quickly on that ship.Filled with scenes of macabre, bloodletting and survival, those initial chapters were beautifully crafted by Poe I especially loved the scene with the ghost ship They were daunting and my imagination went wild there But then the story changes direction Instead of sticking with the crazy atmosphere the story created in the initial chapters, Poe switches to an exploration and speculative narrative which reminded me of Jules Verne stories It seems like Jules Verne was really influenced by this style Verne was a lifelong fan of Poe and he even wrote a sequel to this novel in later years.Anyways, we are now chilling with Pym and his gang in a new ship and they decide to explore the unexplored Antarctic region They find a mysterious Island populated by a tribe of blackEven their teeth are blackThe Island itself is a wonder as it is filled with undiscovered flora and fauna.This part reads like Arthur Conan Doyle s novel, the lost world The previously undiscovered land with strange natives and bizarre environments That s Doyle right there.Now, this is a work that clearly inspired many writers Even HP Lovecraft connects this story with his own novella, At the Mountains of Madness. But as a novel, the narrative suffers from inconsistent story and styles To be honest, after the 13th chapter, the story sacrificed its momentum and failed to gain it back So I m thinking 5 stars for the first half and 2 stars for the rest Also, the ending was What was the ending It felt like one of those weird deaths we hear about in news The ones where people die abruptly as they were typing a senta


  3. Paul Paul says:

    1.5 starsThis is Poe s only novel published in 1838 I haven t read any Poe for many years, having read some of his poetry and his short stories in my teens This is an odd novel Arthur Gordon Pym and his friend Augustus are teenagers in search of adventure Augustus s father is a sea captain A voyage is in the offing and Augustus contrives to enable Pym to stow away A series of adventures ensues eachfarfetched than the previous There is a bloody mutiny, followed by a shipwreck with 1.5 starsThis is Poe s only novel published in 1838 I haven t read any Poe for many years, having read some of his poetry and his short stories in my teens This is an odd novel Arthur Gordon Pym and his friend Augustus are teenagers in search of adventure Augustus s father is a sea captain A voyage is in the offing and Augustus contrives to enable Pym to stow away A series of adventures ensues eachfarfetched than the previous There is a bloody mutiny, followed by a shipwreck with Pym and a small number of survivors left on the wreckage of the ship A long period of floating around leads to cannibalism, an encounter with a ship floating aimlessly with only corpses on board and finally rescue by another ship This ship is on a fur collecting expedition and it continues to slaughter lots of seals It sails into the Antarctic regions, which prove to be surprisingly warm Poe attempts to invent lots of new species of bird and when habitable islands are reached invents a few mammals as well Inhabited islands are reached populated by natives who are primitive but appear friendly They prove to be unfriendly and most of the crew are killed and the ship destroyed Pym and three others manage to escape in a canoe and head for the South Pole as the descriptions become increasingly surreal The ending gives a nod to Reynolds and the hollow earth theories popular at the time On the surface this reads like one of many nineteenth century adventure novels by writers such as Haggard, Stevenson and Kipling comparisons are also drawn with Moby Dick This being Poe, of course, there isgoing on indeed there is a whole industry of interpretation There are clearly allegorical and autobiographical elements and there are also elements of cryptography an interest of Poe s Some of the allegorical elements are said to be religious not convinced by that The novel was obviously written in haste and there are lots of continuity errors Poe is also a bit of a geek about the sea and sailing and there are long descriptive passages about navigation, climate, latitude and longitude, which although well written can be irksome However it is on lots of best novel lists Borges rated it and Freud was fascinated by it as he felt it explored man s unconscious desire for annihilation However you analyse and break down this novel and it is well written with some interesting and experimental aspects , there is an issue which stands out and that is race Poe was from the South and this was written when slavery and everything that went with it was still in place Poe s biographers have pointed out that Poe did not approve of the abolition and believed that black people were inferior.It is noteworthy that one of the principal mutineers was the black cook who portrayed as a monster with no redeeming features The bound seamen were dragged to the gangway Here the cook stood with an axe, striking each victim on the head In this manner twenty two perished The stereotypes keep coming The islanders who are amazed at the white skins of their visitors are portrayed as primitive and almost sub human they are also treacherous Poe describes them thus In truth, from every thing I could see of these wretches, they appeared to be the most wicked, hypocritical, vindictive, bloodthirsty, and altogether fiendish race of men upon the face of the globe You could blame the times Poe was writing in, but this isn t good enough Poe in his article The Philosophy of Composition argues that writing both poetry and prose should show truth and meaning The meaning here is that black is bad and white is the opposite Toni Morrison has forcibly made this point Africanism is the vehicle by which the American self knows itself as not enslaved, but free nor repulsive, but desirable Africanist idiom is used to establish difference or, in a later period, to signal modernity Matt Johnson s novel Pym is an interesting counterpoint where a good black protagonist encounters white savages in the Antarctic and the point is made You want to understand Whiteness, as a pathology and a mindset, you have to look to the source of its assumptions That s why Poe s work mattered It offered passage on a vessel bound for the primal American subconscious, the foundation on which all our visible systems and structures were built I wanted to like this, but I m with Toni Morrison on this one


  4. Edward Lorn Edward Lorn says:

    Some authors were never meant to be novelists Some authors are meant to write short stories and some authors are poets.In The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Poe s thankfully only full length novel, we witness the struggles of an author looking to branch out into long form and having no fucking clue what he is doing You can see a beautifully wretched and bleak novelette or novella in here, but Poe overstays his welcome by about 50 pages Even Poe considered this novel silly Y Some authors were never meant to be novelists Some authors are meant to write short stories and some authors are poets.In The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Poe s thankfully only full length novel, we witness the struggles of an author looking to branch out into long form and having no fucking clue what he is doing You can see a beautifully wretched and bleak novelette or novella in here, but Poe overstays his welcome by about 50 pages Even Poe considered this novel silly You have people on Goodreads touting this pile of shit as SUPERB and A MASTERSTROKE when literary scholars have agreed that they re not even sure what the fuck Poe was talking about half the time Sorry, Weekend Lit Majors, I gotta go with the scholars on this one It s a book of madfuck ramblings and stolen navigation notes Poe cribbed from Jeremiah N Reynolds many explorations And you can tell when these stolen sections come into play because Poe s prose dials down and we re left reading paragraph after paragraph of nautical speak and goddamn coordinates Anyone who gives this meandering and overlong novellathan three stars needs their heads checked I doth believe they ve skipped a cog and hath traveled down the path of the dodo At the very least, they lack research skills.Much like Mr Pym, Poe is lost at sea here The book was originally written in serial form, but was then discontinued, unfinished As Poe was want to do, he revised the text and extended it into the shitbrick castle we view today But that s okay No one s perfect Poe will go down in history as the man who wrote The Cask of Amontillado and The Raven and Masque of the Red Death and so on He was a brilliantly dark author of spectacular fiction This novel is simply not that And the fact that he knew The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym was, in his own words, a very silly book , makes me respect him all the .In summation I hate that I finished this one, but at least my buddy Thomas finally picked a stinker I thought he d never break my streak of choosing truly crappy literature, but he came through for me this time Thanks, dude Overall, this book is a trunk novel that people want to find reasoning in but have, so far, in almost two hundred years, not been able to clearly pin down And that s because there s nothing to pin down Not everything written has to make sense Sometimes, some books are just bad This is one of those bad books by a great writer Deal with it.Final Judgment The anal leavings of a master wordsmith.Source


  5. Matt Matt says:

    I read this in the German translation by Arno Schmidt in preparation of Schmidt s Zettel s Traum, which deals with E.A.Poe.I already read this book decades ago in another translation and liked it quite a bit This new one though was quite another experience a good one If you know Arno Schmidt you also know about his rather unusual way of punctuation In this book he uses it too, especially in the first part I guess the usage of the equal sign instead of the hyphen, the instead of und I read this in the German translation by Arno Schmidt in preparation of Schmidt s Zettel s Traum, which deals with E.A.Poe.I already read this book decades ago in another translation and liked it quite a bit This new one though was quite another experience a good one If you know Arno Schmidt you also know about his rather unusual way of punctuation In this book he uses it too, especially in the first part I guess the usage of the equal sign instead of the hyphen, the instead of und and , and 1 instead of ein a an may turn some people off but not me I love it And it s not overdone either.Another great thing about Schmidt, for me, is his ingenious way of inventing new words that just fit Things like Gekerkre instead of Kerker dungeon , or Labyr mpel instead of there is no single equivalent word for it it s a combination of Labyrinth and Ger mpel labyrinth and lumber , or Per ckoid instead of Per ckenteil some part of a wig just think Donald Trump made me laugh out lout And again, he hasn t overdone it I suppose it s due to Schmidt s reported atheism that he wrote the German word for God with two capital letters GOtt throughout the text What I haven t figured out is the reason why some words are spelled differently sometimes For instance Silbe and Sylbe syllable , or Hai and Hay shark Maybe it s just a mistake by Schmidt that the editor hasn t noticed or was too shy to mention.The result of Arno Schmidt s efforts led to a whole new book in my opinion If I hadn t known in advance I never would have guessed that this is a translation Of course there are people who complain about this very fact that the translation is too far from the original see link to a newspaper article below So be it If those people can decide what a good translation is in terms of nearness to the original, then they can obviously read the original So, why don t they do it in the first place For those of you who cannot read Poe in the original I advise you to check out the translation by Arno Schmidt It s the next best thing Here are some quotes from the original source Project Gutenberg and the translation ____________________from Chapter Ioriginal Matter he stammered, in the greatest apparent surprise, letting go the tiller at the same moment, and falling forward into the bottom of the boat matter why, nothing is the matter going home d d don t you see The whole truth now flashed upon me I flew to him and raised him up He was drunk beastly drunk he could no longer either stand, speak, or see.translation Los , stammelte er, anscheinend in h chstem Erstaunen wobei er aber im selben Augenblick das Steuer fahren lie , und nach vorn ber, auf den Boden des Bootes, fiel los wieso nix iss doch los heim geht s m m merxU das nich Jetzt kam die volle Wahrheit wie ein Blitz ber mich Ich flog hin zu ihm, und richtete ihn auf Er war betrunken viehisch besoffen er konnte weder l nger stehen noch sprechen noch sehen.from Chapter IIoriginalJust as we turned the second corner, after passing Mr Edmund s well, who should appear, standing right in front of me, and looking me full in the face, but old Mr Peterson, my grandfather Why, bless my soul, Gordon, said he, after a long pause, why, why whose dirty cloak is that you have on Sir I replied, assuming, as well as I could, in the exigency of the moment, an air of offended surprise, and talking in the gruffest of all imaginable tones sir you are a sum mat mistaken my name, in the first place, bee nt nothing at all like Goddin, and I d want you for to know better, you blackguard, than to call my new obercoat a darty one translationGerade als wir an Mr Edmunds Brunnen vorbei, und um die zweite Stra enecke danach waren, mu te doch Wer auftauchen, direkt vor mir stehen bleiben mir mitten ins Gesicht starren nat rlich der alte Mr Peterson, mein Gro vater Ja aber meiner Seel , Gordon , sagte er, nach einer langen Pause, wie, wie Mensch, wessen dreck jen Mantel hast den Du da anSir gab ich zur ck nahm, in einem so kritischen Augenblick, nach Kr ften die Miene beleidigten Erstaunens an, und sprach auch in den barschesten T nen, die man sich nur vorstellen kann Sir , Sie kucken woll n b schen queer, was Erstens mal hat mein Name nicht die entfernteste hnlichkeit mit Goddin und weiterhin m cht ich Ihn n nur den 1 guten Tip geben, Sie Lump Sie, da Sie mein n neuen berzieher nich nochmal dreckig nenn n from Chapter IIIoriginalShall I ever forget my feelings at this moment He was going my friend my companion, from whom I had a right to expect so much he was going he would abandon me he was gone He would leave me to perish miserably, to expire in the most horrible and loathsome of dungeons and one word one little syllable would save me yet that single syllable I could not utter I felt, I am sure,than ten thousand times the agonies of death itself.translationOb ich jemals die Empfindungen dieser Augenblicke werde vergessen k nnen da ging er mein Feund mein Gef hrte, von dem ich ein Recht hatte, das H chste zu erwarten da ging er verlie mich war praktisch schon fort War drauf dran, mich dem erb rmlichsten Zugrundegehen zu berlassen, dem Verr cheln im allerekligsten schrecklichsten Gekerkre und ein W rtlein ach was, 1 arme Silbe w rde mich retten und diese 1 einzige Silbe wollte nicht aus mir heraus Ich habe damals, das wei ich gewi , die Schrecken des Todes 10.000 Mal durchlebt.from Chapter IVoriginalHis arms, as well as legs, were bowed in the most singular manner, and appeared to possess no flexibility whatever His head was equally deformed, being of immense size, with an indentation on the crown like that on the head of most negroes , and entirely bald To conceal this latter deficiency, which did not proceed from old age, he usually wore a wig formed of any hair like material which presented itself occasionally the skin of a Spanish dog or American grizzly bear.translationSeine Arme, und die Beine nicht minder, waren in der allereigent mlichsten Weise gebogen und schienen keinerlei Flechsibilit t zu besitzen Gleicherma en verformt war sein Kopf von unwahrscheinlicher Gr e mit einer kleinen D lle auf dem Scheitel wie sie sich bei den meisten Negersch deln vorfindet , und dazu v llig kahl Um letztbesagten Defekt, der nicht etwa von hohem Alter herr hrte, zu tarnen, trug er gew hnlich ein Per ckoid, aus dem erst besten haar hnlichen Material, das just bei der Hand war vom Fell eines spanischen Wachtelh ndchens an, bis notfalls hinauf zum amerikanischen Grizzly.from Chapter VoriginalHe pushed on for some time in a most pitiable state of anxiety, until, at length, he found the pathway utterly blocked up, and that there was no possibility of making any farther way by the course in which he had set out Overcome now by his feelings, he threw himself among the lumber in despair, and wept like a child.translationSo k mpfte er sich, in einem wahrhaft bemitleidenswerten Zustand von Niedergeschlagenheit noch eine Weile f rder bis er endlich seinen Nicht Pfad endg ltig blockiert fand und erkennen mu te, da es auf diesem zur Zeit eingeschlagtenen Wege, keine M glichkeit eines Weiterkommens mehr gebe Da warf er sich, bermannt von seinen Gef hlen, voller Verzweifelung mitten ins Labyr mpel hin, und weinte wie ein Kind.from Chapter VIoriginalThe stowage on board the Grampus was most clumsily done, if stowage that could be called which was little better than a promiscuous huddling together of oil casks 1 and ship furniture 1 Whaling vessels are usually fitted with iron oil tanks why the Grampus was not I have never been able to ascertain translationDie Ladung an Bord der GRAMPUS nun, war aufs ungeschickteste gestaut worden vorausgesetzt, da man mit Stauen bezeichnen will, was in wenig mehr als einem hudligen ber nanderh ufen von lf ssern Schiffsausr stung bestand Walfangschiffe sind f r gew hnlich mit eisernen ltanks ausger stet wieso das beim GRAMPUS nicht der Fall war, habe ich niemals in Erfahrung bringen k nnen from Chapter XIIoriginalThey are frequently found of an enormous size I have myself seen several which would weigh from twelve to fifteen hundred pounds, although I do not remember that any navigator speaks of having seen them weighingthan eight hundred Their appearance is singular, and even disgusting Their steps are very slow, measured, and heavy, their bodies being carried about a foot from the ground Their neck is long, and exceedingly slender from eighteen inches to two feet is a very common length, and I killed one, where the distance from the shoulder to the extremity of the head was no less than three feet ten inches.translationMan trifft h ufig Exemplare von enormer Gr e an Ich habe selbst einige gesehen, die zwischen zw lf und f nfzehnhundert Pfund gewogen haben m ssen obwohl ich mich nicht erinnern kann, da Reisende berichtet h tten, je St cke von ber 800 Pfund Gewicht angetroffen zu haben Ihr Aussehen ist sonderbar, ja, zum Teil widerlich Die Schritte erfolgen sehr langsam, abgemessen schwerf llig wobei der Leib etwa 1 Fu berm Erdboden getragen wird Ihr Hals ist lang dabei u erst geschlank 45 60 Zentimeter ist eine ganz normale L nge und ich habe einmal eine erlegt, wo der Abstand von der Schulter bis zur Sch delspitze nicht weniger als 115 betrug.from Chapter XIVoriginalBesides the penguin many other birds are here to be found, among which may be mentioned seahens, blue peterels, teal, ducks, Port Egmont hens, shags, Cape pigeons, the nelly, seaswallows, terns, seagulls, Mother Carey s chickens, Mother Carey s geese, or the great peterel, and, lastly, the albatross.The great peterel is as large as the common albatross, and is carnivorous It is frequently called the break bones, or osprey peterel translationNeben dem Pinguin sind noch viele andere Vogelarten hier vertreten, von denen die Lumme erw hnt sei, der blaue Sturmvogel, die Krickente, sowie Enten allgemein, Port Egmont Hennen also Raubm ven , Kr henscharten, Captauben, Nellies oder Riesensturmv gel , See Meer Schwalben, Seem ven, Mutter Careys K chlein Fulmar , Mutter Carey s Gans oder der Gro e Sturmvogel, und endlich noch der Albatross Der Gro e Peters oder Sturm Vogel wird ebenso gro wie der gew hnliche Albatross, und ist ein beraus rei endes Tier, weshalb er auch h ufig als Knochenbrecher oder Fischadler bezeichnet wird Ein SchubI discovered an article from the Zeit Online Magazin in which the author complains that there were no good translations of E.A.Poe into German In particular, he, the article writer, has nothing good to say about Arno Schmidt s translation of Arthur Gordon Pym Instead he praises the new in 2009 translation by Hans Schmid as a gain To prove his thesis, the following paragraph is quoted originalI can hardly tell what possessed me, but the words were no sooner out of his mouth than I felt a thrill of the greatest excitement and pleasure, and thought his mad idea one of the most delightful and most reasonable things in the world It was blowing almost a gale, and the weather was very cold it being late in October I sprang out of bed, nevertheless, in a kind of ecstasy, and told him I was quite as brave as himself, and quite as tired as he was of lying in bed like a dogtranslation by Arno Schmidt Ich kann schwerlich klar formulieren, was mich jetzt berkam aber kaum, da diese Worte aus seinem Munde waren, versp rte ich einen Schauder aus kitzelndster Erregung L sternheit und seine Tollmannsidee d nkte mich eine der erg tzlichsten logischsten Angelegenheiten von der Welt Der Wind war nahezu b ig zu nennen, und das Wetter empfindlich kalt ging es doch schon gegen Ende Oktober Nichtsdestoweniger sprang ich aus dem Bett und informierte ihn, da ich genauso tapfer sei wie er auch und g nzlich so berdr ssig, wie er, mich wie ein Hund im Bette zusammenzurollentranslation by Hans Schmid Ich kann kaum sagen, was da in mich gefahren ist, aber die Worte waren kaum ber seine Lippen gekommen, da durchfuhr mich bereits ein Gef hl der gr ten Freude und Erregung, und ich hielt seine verr ckte Idee f r einen der wunderbarsten und vern nftigsten Vorschl ge von der Welt Drau en tobte schon fast ein Sturm, und das Wetter war sehr kalt es war Ende Oktober Trotzdem sprang ich in einer Art Ekstase aus dem Bett und sagte ihm, ich sei genauso mutig wie er, und genau wie er h tte ich genug davon, wie ein Hund im Bett zu liegenGranted AS s translation is not as close to the original as the one from HS But let s face it isn t the one from AS just terrific and wayfun If anything should ever be so close to the original why then with all due respect shouldn t one go directly to the original and read that from the last ChapteroriginalMany unusual phenomena now indicated that we were entering upon a region of novelty and wonder A high range of light gray vapour appeared constantly in the southern horizon, flaring up occasionally in lofty streaks, now darting from east to west, now from west to east, and again presenting a level and uniform summit in short, having all the wild variations of the Aurora Borealis.translationManch ungew hnliches F nomen deutete nun darauf hin, da wir im Begriffe st nden, in eine Region der Novit ten Wunder einzudringen Ein hohe Bande aus lichtgrauem Ged mpf erschien best ndig am s dlichen Horizont flackerte gelegentlich auf, in luft gen Streifen, die jetzt von Ost nach West, jetzt von Ost nach West schossen dann zeigte der obere Rand sich wieder eben einf rmig kurzum, sie hatte all die wild wirre Ver nderlichkeit der Aurora Borealis.__________Update 10 5 16 While reading Arno Schmidt s Zettels Traum I realize there s a lotto Poe s text than meets the eyes at first glance Listening to D n s a character from ZT explanation of Etyms I think it makes sense to add this short piece to the list of translations from Chapter 25 originalMany unusual phenomena now indicated that we were entering upon a region of novelty and wonder.translationManch ungew hnliches F nomen deutete nun darauf hin, da wir im Begriff st nden, in eine Region der Novit ten Wunder einzudringen This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License


  6. Brian Brian says:

    Shipwrecks Cannibalism Wiley natives This is a quintessential ripping yarn, a page turner of the most classic kind a book that inspired Melville and caused Auden to gush It s Poe s only novel, and perhaps given his master of the short form it s best that he only gave us one to savor And that ending I wish I hadn t read the appendix the end to the main narrative was so shocking and unexpected, so good Yes, yes, there are those long passages about rookeries and longitudinal markings, but Shipwrecks Cannibalism Wiley natives This is a quintessential ripping yarn, a page turner of the most classic kind a book that inspired Melville and caused Auden to gush It s Poe s only novel, and perhaps given his master of the short form it s best that he only gave us one to savor And that ending I wish I hadn t read the appendix the end to the main narrative was so shocking and unexpected, so good Yes, yes, there are those long passages about rookeries and longitudinal markings, but don t skim those beauties Poe writes in such precise language the reader comes away from each sentence with the impression that the brush strokes couldn t be improved I m reading Poe as a prelude to reading Arno Schmidt s Bottom s Dream and I m very happy that it led me to finally reading something I ve always meant to get to


  7. Bertrand Jost Bertrand Jost says:

    This is the only novel of Edgar Allan Poe I really wanted to read it, back in 2013, because knowing Poe s literary skills for telling interesting stories and keeping the reader engaged, I was eager to see if Poe could manage the same through the course of a whole novel I must say that the result is rather successful The book relates the story of a young sailor Arthur Gordon Pym who sails off aboard a whaling ship called the Grampus From there, Pym undergoes a series of adventures including s This is the only novel of Edgar Allan Poe I really wanted to read it, back in 2013, because knowing Poe s literary skills for telling interesting stories and keeping the reader engaged, I was eager to see if Poe could manage the same through the course of a whole novel I must say that the result is rather successful The book relates the story of a young sailor Arthur Gordon Pym who sails off aboard a whaling ship called the Grampus From there, Pym undergoes a series of adventures including shipwreck, mutiny, cannibalism andAs the story unravels, the interest of the reader is constantly renewed through very well crafted descriptions of the various situations, and an excellent portrayal of the hero s emotions and despair as the dramatic tension builds up at every turn until at the last minute an unexpected event saves the day, only to throw the poor Pym falling into another danger I read this book on the train to work every day and I must say, on each trip, I was sorry to reach my destination as I was eager to follow on Pym on his adventure.As Poe juggles with his hero from adventures to mishaps, he keeps the story on a constant thread the hero is actually always sailing southward and each new unexpected event takes him further in that direction This is important because the book was written in 1838 at a time when Antarctica was not yet discovered making this land the last frontier of the world This last continent was first approached by Captain James Cook in 1773 Cook hypothesized that a continent may lie further to the south An American sealer John Davis might have landed there in 1821 but this was little known at the time In 1839 and 1840 French and American expeditions reported the presence of a continent south of Latin America but again this land was mostly unchartered This gave Poe an opportunity for bringing his story into the realm of the extraordinary that he cherished so much Unfortunately, that last part was a failure in my opinion For most of the book, Poe excelled in the realist drama that he managed to create but as his hero sails further south, the story becomes increasingly strange and weird with a labyrinth, strange marks, warm water and a huge shrouded white figure Then the story ends abruptly with a small post scriptural note where Poe tries to build a sense of mystery around the fate of his hero I found the ending disappointing Poe clearly didn t know where to go with his story He might have been tempted to offer his vision of what might lie around the South Pole but in the end he was probably lacking any true idea or opinion about what that might be and he decided to leave it as a mystery All in all, I would still recommend this book for the very realistic chapters and also because the book later became an inspirational stepping stone to the work of renowned writers such as Herman Melville and Jules Verne One can see how Melville and Verne were tempted to take Poe s vision a step further


  8. mark monday mark monday says:

    an unusually restrained Edgar Allan Poe strips away hispoetic tendencies as well as his luscious prose in this Narrative, his only novel the result is an adventure that is grim, Grim, GRIM and so ends up feeling much like Poe after all, despite the shift in style.a feckless youth decides to follow his heart and his sailor friend by stowing away on a whaling ship sounds like a recipe for an exciting voyage full of adventure, bromance, mind opening experiences and perhaps a little Com an unusually restrained Edgar Allan Poe strips away hispoetic tendencies as well as his luscious prose in this Narrative, his only novel the result is an adventure that is grim, Grim, GRIM and so ends up feeling much like Poe after all, despite the shift in style.a feckless youth decides to follow his heart and his sailor friend by stowing away on a whaling ship sounds like a recipe for an exciting voyage full of adventure, bromance, mind opening experiences and perhaps a little Coming of Age, right WRONG so very, very wrong little does he know, our poor lad is living in a novel written by Edgar Allan Poe he has made a decision to leave all safety and sanity behind and to instead naturally enough, near starvation dehydration a savage attack from a furry friend mutiny bloodthirsty slaughter then evenbloodthirsty slaughter horrific weather capsizingstarvation,dehydration cannibalism the death of all dignity occurs and then the adventure is only half over coming aboard a new ship, our plucky young hero asshole uses his powers of persuasion and his ability to make a grown man doubt his own manhood, and manages to convince his new captain to continue their voyage to Antarctica despite a distinct lack of fuel and supplies guess whathorrifying things occur Arthur Gordon Pym is, above all things, a bonafide dumbass.this was an interesting experience the past month was a busy time for me, so I pretty much just read this in 20 minute installments it was maybe the best way to read it it is a dry book but not an impenetrable one fairly easy going down, in its own austere way the horrors occur so regularly that it was rather nice taking a break after each new disaster and Poe includes many lengthy discussions and explorations of fairly technical topics things like proper and improper methods of stowage on a whaling ship that he apparently took verbatim from other texts of the time period that could have been tedious if I had decided to read this over the course of a few sittings, but spread out over a longer period of time, it actually was pretty interesting so I knew that each time I cracked open this book, I was sure to get both an atrocity and a bit of education.a word about the ending it is just the kind of abrupt and entirely ambiguous ending that pleases me to no end the sea changing color and turning viscous, the wall of mist, birds fleeing from something, an eerie white figure in the distance and then full stop no questions answered it was like I was reading a sea journey written by Joseph Conrad and then all of a sudden the author remembered he was Edgar Allan Poe


  9. Alex Alex says:

    Pym is a great delirious fever nightmare of a novel, barely a novel at all, influencing everything from Moby Dick to Lovecraft It shares with Treasure Island an archetypal feel when Poe describes being lost at sea and debating cannibalism, you think, So this is where my brain got that image from It s fairly insane, as books go There s Poe s usual fascination with being buried alive, and as thrilling a description of vertigo as I ve ever read He seems to have had no particular structure in Pym is a great delirious fever nightmare of a novel, barely a novel at all, influencing everything from Moby Dick to Lovecraft It shares with Treasure Island an archetypal feel when Poe describes being lost at sea and debating cannibalism, you think, So this is where my brain got that image from It s fairly insane, as books go There s Poe s usual fascination with being buried alive, and as thrilling a description of vertigo as I ve ever read He seems to have had no particular structure in mind he hated the idea of novels and wrote this one for money He changes gears at will The dog Tiger appears from nowhere and disappears to nowhere And then there s that ending.It s racist as hell I mean, the evil black cook and jabbering natives would be bad enough on their own but that s just scratching the surface here the entire book is about black and white, black representing everything uncivilized and evil and amply personified by black people The book itself is in black and white Not shades of grey monochrome Antichrome Those jabbering natives, like, when someone s white shirt brushes a guy s face he s like Oh God no, white stuff Tekeli liThe water on their island is dark purple It reminded me of that line from Third Bass s classic Gas Face Black cat is bad luck, bad guys wear black Musta been a white guy who started all that.Poe was himself badly racist, pro slavery, so let s not fool ourselves here But it is also true that Pym as a narrator is an asshole, and the native chief Too Wit s response to white explorers is entirely reasonable as Mat Johnson points out in his book Pym and the only other competent character in the book is Dirk Peters, who s Native American by way of black, andI don t know, the racism here didn t bother me as much as it might have, somehow I mean, I m bumping it down a star because I facepalmed several times, butPoe himself bothers me This book doesn t.But speaking of black vs white, let s talk about this ending here with no plot spoilers but a feel spoiler , one of the most surprising endings in literature When I got to it I thought my edition was screwed up somehow Where s the rest of it It s like someone told Poe how many words are in a novel, and when he got to that many he just dropped the mic But I like it, honestly It feels right Some endings wrap everything up and yet you feel dissatisfied but some books do what they need to do and then quit, and this is that type


  10. Nancy Oakes Nancy Oakes says:

    Read in April for plot, etc you can go here otherwise, as usual, read on.Since the first time I read this book some years ago, I ve done a lot of reading about it and I ve discovered that even Poe scholars can t agree on what to make of it Dana D Nelson in her The Word in Black and White Reading Race in American Literature, 1638 1867 notes that Readings of Pym range widely, from psychoanalytic exploration to social satire, from self referential commentary on writing or reading to a m Read in April for plot, etc you can go here otherwise, as usual, read on.Since the first time I read this book some years ago, I ve done a lot of reading about it and I ve discovered that even Poe scholars can t agree on what to make of it Dana D Nelson in her The Word in Black and White Reading Race in American Literature, 1638 1867 notes that Readings of Pym range widely, from psychoanalytic exploration to social satire, from self referential commentary on writing or reading to a metacritical demonstration of utter absence of meaning Those commenting on the text apparently cannot reach any consensus or thrust toward uniformity, Depending on which whose critique analysis you read, Poe s Pym is either a seagoing take on the American push for frontier expansion, an interior journey into the self, a quest novel vis a vis Harold Bloom s definition, mentioned in this edition s introduction, 27 a jeremiad of the evils of slavery or covert statement of Southern racist ideology 29 , and it has even been noted as in part a story of thwarted colonialism from Mat Johnson s hilarious novel Pym Author Toni Morrison also argues re Poe s work that no early American writer isimportant to the concept of American Africanism than Poe because of the focus on the symbolism of black and white in Poe s novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym is a strange but interesting little book According to that online font of knowledge called Wikipedia, Poe himself called this a silly little book, and in some ways he s definitely right It is way over the top and as another GR reviewer puts it, the elephant in the room of racism is definitely there as an aside, whether Poe was was not a racist is still a matter of debate in scholarly circles After having read it, I can see why there are so many different interpretations of this novel you can also add in bildungsroman , but in my opinion, no matter how you read it, it is much like many of Poe s other works, largely concerned with confronting the self in terms of other if nothing else, the scene where he is disguised as a a dead man and can t recognize himself in the mirror is a huge clue , and the destabilization of the self that follows as a result In the end, though I believe it s a novel best appreciated on an individual basis I mean, seriously, if vast numbers of scholars over the last 100 plus years can t agree about the nature of Pym, how can there be any definitive interpretation A brief word about this book for anyone remotely interested in further studies of Poe s Pym, this particular edition from Broadview Press is a good place to start The narrative is extensively footnoted, and there are three appendices Sources for the Novel , Contemporary Reviews, and Other Writers Responses to Pym Melville, Beaudelaire, Jules Verne, and Henry James It also has an extensive bibliography and even a map of Pym s travels


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