A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter & the End

A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter & the End of the Arms Race [Reading] ➲ A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter & the End of the Arms Race ➺ Carl Sagan – Thomashillier.co.uk Today, global nuclear arsenals hold nearly , weapons, sufficient to devastate every city on Earth times over Nuclear policy in the US and Russia was based on winning a nuclear war until , when the di Today, global nuclear arsenals hold nearly , weapons, Where No PDF ↠ sufficient to devastate every city on Earthtimes over A Path Epub / Nuclear policy in the US and Russia was based on winning a nuclear war until , when Path Where No Kindle Õ the discovery of nuclear winter helped to alter this outlook radically Illustrated.


About the Author: Carl Sagan

In , scientist Carl Sagan was born in Where No PDF ↠ Brooklyn, NY After earning bachelor and master s A Path Epub / degrees at Cornell, Sagan earned a double doctorate at the University of Chicago in He became Path Where No Kindle Õ professor of astronomy and space science and director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at Cornell University, and co founder of the Planetary Society A great popularizer of science, Sagan produced the PBS series, Cosmos, which was Emmy and Peabody award winning, and was watched by million people in countries A book of the same title came out in , and was on The New York Times bestseller list for weeks Sagan was author, co author or editor of books, including The Dragons of Eden , which won a Pulitzer, Pale Blue Dot and The Demon Haunted World Science As a Candle in the Dark , his hardest hitting on religion With his wife, Ann Druyan, he was co producer of the popular motion picture, Contact, which featured a feminist, atheist protagonist played by Jodie Foster The film came out after Sagan s death, following a year struggle with a bone marrow disease Sagan played a leading role in NASA s Mariner, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo expeditions to other planets Ann Druyan, in the epilogue to Sagan s last book, Billions and Billions Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium published posthumously in , gives a moving account of Carl s last days Contrary to the fantasies of the fundamentalists, there was no deathbed conversion, no last minute refuge taken in a comforting vision of a heaven or an afterlife For Carl, what mattered most was what was true, not merely what would make us feel better Even at this moment when anyone would be forgiven for turning away from the reality of our situation, Carl was unflinching As we looked deeply into each other s eyes, it was with a shared conviction that our wondrous life together was ending forever For his work, Dr Sagan received the NASA medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and twice for Distinguished Public Service, as well as the NASA Apollo Achievement Award Asteroid Sagan is named after him He was also awarded the John F Kennedy Astronautics Award of the American Astronautical Society, the Explorers Club th Anniversary Award, the Konstantin Tsiolkovsky Medal of the Soviet Cosmonauts Federation, and the Masursky Award of the American Astronomical Society, for his extraordinary contributions to the development of planetary science As a scientist trained in both astronomy and biology, Dr Sagan has made seminal contributions to the study of planetary atmospheres, planetary surfaces, the history of the Earth, and exobiology Many of the most productive planetary scientists working today are his present and former students and associatesHe was also a recipient of the Public Welfare Medal, the highest award of the National Academy of SciencesDr Sagan was elected Chairman of the Division of Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, President of the Planetology Section of the American Geophysical Union, and Chairman of the Astronomy Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science For twelve years he was the editor in chief of Icarus, the leading professional journal devoted to planetary research He was cofounder and President of the Planetary Society, a , member organization that is the largest space interest group in the world and Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of TechnologyIn their posthumous award to Dr Sagan of their highest honor, the National Science Foundation declared that his research transformed planetary science his gifts to mankind were infinite D More.



10 thoughts on “A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter & the End of the Arms Race

  1. Callum Watson Callum Watson says:

    Terrifying


  2. GeekChick GeekChick says:

    What I remember most of this book is that it scared the % out of me This was one of the earliest popular works about nuclear winter As a teenager in the midst of the Cold War, it firmly influenced my thinking on this subject Not for the weak at heart this book is certainly not written in Sagan s usual style It s definitely drier, if I remember correctly But if you are interested in the subject, I recommend it As far as I am aware, the findings of the early nuclear winter studies ha What I remember most of this book is that it scared the % out of me This was one of the earliest popular works about nuclear winter As a teenager in the midst of the Cold War, it firmly influenced my thinking on this subject Not for the weak at heart this book is certainly not written in Sagan s usual style It s definitely drier, if I remember correctly But if you are interested in the subject, I recommend it As far as I am aware, the findings of the early nuclear winter studies have not been refuted by subsequent science


  3. Kate Kate says:

    Must read despite the scientific redundancy It s an acceptable redundancy imo due to the serious nature of the book The sources take up nearly half of the book Very well researched and sourced I m interested in finding and reading amodern account of the status of nuclear weapons worldwide.


  4. P.S. Winn P.S. Winn says:

    Carl Sagan was a man ahead of his time, This book talks about nuclear war and what it really means The author had no idea how close a new U.S President might be at making that horrific future a possibility No one wins a nuclear war, someone should make sure the leaders of all countries, especially America know it.


  5. teohjitkhiam teohjitkhiam says:

    Rereading this makes me wonder if states w smaller stock aredangerous They may think nuke war is survivable.


  6. Patrick Kelly Patrick Kelly says:

    I was holding off on reading this Sagan book because it seemed dense and off topic, but I am glad that I read it I absolutely love when Sagan talks about society, politics, the environment etc He takes the importance of living on this planet seriously As he says we have an obligation to survive This is a book about pushing our species to the limit and how close to extinction we have become Many parts of this book are dense and technical Sagan goes in depth on policy and the science of nu I was holding off on reading this Sagan book because it seemed dense and off topic, but I am glad that I read it I absolutely love when Sagan talks about society, politics, the environment etc He takes the importance of living on this planet seriously As he says we have an obligation to survive This is a book about pushing our species to the limit and how close to extinction we have become Many parts of this book are dense and technical Sagan goes in depth on policy and the science of nuclear war and nuclear winter I did not really understand the technical but I got the message.A big part of the thesis of this book is laying out the idea and science behind nuclear winter Basically that nuclear weapons are not fully contained and that the fall out would be devastating to the world and would not recognize borders That the threat of nuclear winter changes the factors of nuclear deterrence Much of the science focused on the green house effect and climate change Concepts that we are facing today One could substitute nuclear war for climate change AI or some other global threat and this book would be relevant today Sagan actually did his doctoral thesis on the green house effect on Venus It explains his fascination with climate change and constant work with it.Much of the policy sections I wasinterested in because of my political science background I don t feel like nuclear winter, deterrence factors, and other policies were talked about in my classes as they were in this book Notes There is the paradox that as we get ride of nuclear weapons the remaining ones becomepowerful.Kennedy spent an afternoon with his advisers going over the effects of nuclear war, threats, consequences, death tolls, etc as the end of the meeting he looked and said and we call our selves the human race Sagan suggested that every world leader with nuclear weapons should have meetings like this Finally It is insane that the world has nuclear weapons We are a ticking time bomb Again Sagan tried to warn us about what was to come but we did not listen


  7. Jason Jason says:

    Good, but dated I wish Sagan s vision of a possible nuclear de escalation were realistic Sadly he didn t have to take the very real threat of non state terrorist actors not to mention demented state leaders obtaining nuclear weapons If you think Sagan s view was bleak, just look at our modern nuclear reality Now THAT is truly terrifying.


  8. Scott Kardel Scott Kardel says:

    I never thought I would give a book by Carl Sagan and Richard Turco just 2 stars, but then this is a book about nuclear war and specifically the development and implications of nuclear winter It is an important book that clearly shows that there can be no winners in even a limited nuclear war, but it isn t an especially happy book to read The book was published 25 years ago and one of the hopes of the authors was that revelation that nuclear winter presents a danger to everyone on Earth woul I never thought I would give a book by Carl Sagan and Richard Turco just 2 stars, but then this is a book about nuclear war and specifically the development and implications of nuclear winter It is an important book that clearly shows that there can be no winners in even a limited nuclear war, but it isn t an especially happy book to read The book was published 25 years ago and one of the hopes of the authors was that revelation that nuclear winter presents a danger to everyone on Earth would lead to disarmament, and while there has been some, there are still thousands of nuclear warheads in the world today


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