The Essence Of The Reformation: Includes Bonus Classic


The Essence Of The Reformation: Includes Bonus Classic Works By Luther, Calvin And Crammer ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☄ The Essence Of The Reformation: Includes Bonus Classic Works By Luther, Calvin And Crammer Author Kirsten Birkett – Thomashillier.co.uk Corruption in the church Political turmoil and intrigue A clash of new ideas and ancient pagan religions Courageous and extraordinary individuals Doctrinal disputes that were matters of life and death Corruption in Of The Kindle Ó the church Political turmoil and intrigue A clash of new ideas and ancient pagan religions Courageous and extraordinary individuals Doctrinal disputes that were matters of life and death Welcome to the Reformation , that explosive period of European history fromto the turn of the century The Reformation determined the shape of our modern world, and yet many people today, even Christians, have very little idea of even the basic events and people involved In this introductory book, Kirsten Birkett brings us the essence of the Reformation The Essence ePUB ½ the social and religious soil in which it grew, the events and people that shaped it, and the ideas and doctrines for which many of them died This new edition includes three classic works from the Reformation Martin Luther on freedom, John Calvin on prayer, and Thomas Cranmer on salvation Recommendation from DA Carson I do not know any book that succinctly gets across, in readable prose, what the Reformation was about This new edition combines Birkett s superb text with some judiciously selected primary documents This is a Essence Of The PDF/EPUB ½ book to distribute widely among lay leaders and other Christians who want to be informed of the heritage of the gospel that has come down to us.


10 thoughts on “The Essence Of The Reformation: Includes Bonus Classic Works By Luther, Calvin And Crammer

  1. Brenda Brenda says:

    This was exactly what I wanted a concise overview of the Reformation, and I thought it was very good The Essence of the Reformation itself is only about 100 pages long This edition has an additional almost 200 pages of works by Luther, Calvin, and Cranmer I haven t decided yet whether I will read that section.


  2. Ryan Linkous Ryan Linkous says:

    My rating consists of the 100 pages of the book which are Birkett s own writing parts 1 3 She admirably tries to account for the broader medieval and Renaissance historical context part 1 , a history of the Reformation part 2 , and a review of some basic Reformation doctrines as distinct from the Roman Catholic church of the Reformation era part 3 The 100 pages are brief the words on the page are rather big and so this a rather sweeping account At times, I could feel the loaded meanin My rating consists of the 100 pages of the book which are Birkett s own writing parts 1 3 She admirably tries to account for the broader medieval and Renaissance historical context part 1 , a history of the Reformation part 2 , and a review of some basic Reformation doctrines as distinct from the Roman Catholic church of the Reformation era part 3 The 100 pages are brief the words on the page are rather big and so this a rather sweeping account At times, I could feel the loaded meaning of Birkett s sentences Sometimes, I felt they were generalizations improperly characterized a few things like the role of the sacraments and liturgy in the thought of the Reformers or the role of ritual in medieval Catholicism Even in these moments though, she tries to nuance herself so she is not giving a naive accounting of the facts.The Reformation history section like the her entire book goes quickly, but she does a good job of placing the main Reformers Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Knox, and Cramner within their context whichreference to their historical political and ecclesiastical counterparts popes, princes, and kings rather than other Reformers or theologians This section is organized by geography Germany, Switzerland, France, Scotland, and England Zwingli and Knox are given just a few pages each, but on the other hand, Birkett mentions the brief and largely unsuccessful reformation in France This section leaves one feeling that she gives short shrift to some key aspects of the Reformers doctrine For example, not much mention is given to Calvin s emphasis on God s sovereignty or even to Luther s doctrine of justification by faith or freedom of the will These deficiencies are addressed in a roundabout way in part 3 and presented in the primary sources in part 4.In part 3, Birkett surveys the theological and religious differences between Protestants and Catholics by comparing the Reformers to Erasmus She gives uses the solas to demonstrate the doctrinal difference and how they relate practically to the Christian life Sacramental protestants likely won t love her accounting of the sacraments and liturgy, and it could be easy for sacramental wary Protestants to becomeritual averse Nevertheless, I do believe this will help people understand why the Reformation mattered.The last 200 pages part 4 are works of primary sources from the Reformation and really make this a worthwhile purchase only 12 and textbook for a church level Reformation class The best and most recent translations of some essential Reformation writings are included The full text of Luther s The Freedom of the Christian and his sermon Two Kinds of Righteousness from the critical Luther s Works are included as well as Battle s translation of John Calvin s section on prayer from the Institutes It also includes Cramner s Homily on Salvation and A Short Declaration on the true, lively and Christian faith This book will make a great resource to teach on the Reformation I might begin with part 3 and then use all of part 4 Extra knowledge of the Reformation will be helpful if you use this to teach a class at church, since it is only a brief survey.To purchase this book, it will be easiest to purchase from Matthias Media directly


  3. Lauren Lauren says:

    I really like the way Kirsten Birkett laid out this book it flows really well and is just the right length for me It doesn t go into SUPER detail but it does go into enough detail for you to get the whole picture of what was going on around Europe, in what order, and who the big players were I now feel like I have a much better idea in my mind about what was actually happening in the world around the time of the reformation, both in the church and in the wider political arena I haven t fin I really like the way Kirsten Birkett laid out this book it flows really well and is just the right length for me It doesn t go into SUPER detail but it does go into enough detail for you to get the whole picture of what was going on around Europe, in what order, and who the big players were I now feel like I have a much better idea in my mind about what was actually happening in the world around the time of the reformation, both in the church and in the wider political arena I haven t finished reading the bonus classics yet but I will I swear I will It will just take me a while Not light reading


  4. Joy Joy says:

    A remarkably clear and well rounded explanation of the Reformation, especially given that it s only 99 pages long with fairly large text and is easy to understand Note that my copy did not contain the bonus material from Luther etc This book brings out the key ideas clearly There is a useful chapter explaining the religious landscape in Europe at the time, which helps to unpack what the Reformers were reacting against This includes an explanation of the theology and philosophy behind many A remarkably clear and well rounded explanation of the Reformation, especially given that it s only 99 pages long with fairly large text and is easy to understand Note that my copy did not contain the bonus material from Luther etc This book brings out the key ideas clearly There is a useful chapter explaining the religious landscape in Europe at the time, which helps to unpack what the Reformers were reacting against This includes an explanation of the theology and philosophy behind many of the practices Another chapter explains what happened in various different countries, not just Germany The final chapter explains what the key doctrinal and main points at the heart of the Reformation were


  5. Brodie Brodie says:

    A concise, helpful review of the events and theology of the reformation I found most helpful the examination of pre reformation context, and the intertwining of political, social and theological factors throughout Easy to read in a single sitting, with very engaging and simple writing from Birkett.Recommended as a reminder of the importance of Biblical Christianity, especially in contrast to pre reformation and contemporary mysticism.


  6. Patrick Patrick says:

    A quick and easy read Just 99 pages Just what I needed to learn about the Reformation which tells me that it is not what I can do for God but what He can do for me Not by works but Faith Alone Recommended.


  7. Matthew Prydden Matthew Prydden says:

    This is really good introduction to the Reformation It doesn t go into any great deal, but it introduces you to what the Reformation was about in a clear and simply comprehensive way.


  8. Sam James Sam James says:

    Easy to read, a little too surface level if you re excited about learning about meatier stuff But a good introduction and Calvin on prayer is absolutely beautiful.


  9. Emmeline Emmeline says:

    A really great little book about the reformation


  10. David Sarkies David Sarkies says:

    The foundations of the Protestant church15 December 2013 The Reformation, or as some people suggest, the Western Schism, is something that seems to be drummed down our throats at most Evangelical churches and is considered to be the second most important event in salvation history after the incarnation of Christ and while they may not openly say that there is a strong inference that it is However, it is interesting that I have heard one fundamentalist preacher suggest that the Reformation is The foundations of the Protestant church15 December 2013 The Reformation, or as some people suggest, the Western Schism, is something that seems to be drummed down our throats at most Evangelical churches and is considered to be the second most important event in salvation history after the incarnation of Christ and while they may not openly say that there is a strong inference that it is However, it is interesting that I have heard one fundamentalist preacher suggest that the Reformation is probably the single most disastrous event in Church history, and that is something that I would seriously oppose However, its importance among the evangelical Western church cannot be understated since most of those churches and their beliefs would not have existed but for the fact that one German night Martin Luther nailed a statement of defiance to the doors of a German cathedral My position is that the reformation was bound to happen sooner or later, and I am one of those people that believe that if it was not Martin Luther who had risen up to challenge the excesses of the Roman Catholic church, somebody else would have come along sooner or later and done the same thing The thing with Luther is that the timing was right, and even if the timing was not right at then it would have come about sooner or later The reason that I say that is because Luther did not happen in a vacuum, but rather was a continuation of numerous rebellions against the tyranny of the church, and unlike the earlier rebels Luther succeeded The major aspect of the Reformation had to do with freedom, and in a way it was to Christianity what the French Revolution was to politics it overthrew a tyranny to replace it with the freedom to think, to question, and to come to conclusions oneself However there are still many churches out there that are so convinced that the average person cannot make a wise decision that they will refuse to allow the congregation to choose their leaders and instead appoint them from those whom they liked One of the churches that I have been to arranges their leaders through a series of appointments The trustees of the church are appointed and not by the congregation at large who then appoints the senior pastor, who then in turn appoints the other pastors, who then in turn appoint the elders and other leaders Another church that I attend has the congregation at large elect the vestry a kind of council for the church and the vestry then appoints the senior pastor, and the senior pastor remains only as long as he holds the confidence of the vestry Another church that I regularly attend elects every aspect of their leadership, and that leadership is confirmed by the church as a whole The concern that people have though is what if an ungodly person gets into a position of power and begins to undermine the sanctity of the church Truth be told is that that happens, and when we turn to the bible we see that Jesus actually suggests that we should not make a move against that person Personally I think that involveswith kicking people out of the church something that should be done in only incredibly rare circumstances, though I have heard of pastors doing it a little too frequently rather than removing somebody who is ungodly, however the pastor still needs to maintain the confidence of the congregation otherwise they will simply get up, leave, and find another church That is what I consider to be the essence of the reformation freedom Freedom of religion and freedom from religion What the reformation gave us was the ability to choose how to worship, who to worship, and whether we actually want to waste our time worshipping something that we don t actually believe exists There are many pastors out their that bemoan the state of our society and the fact that people are no longer going to church As far as I am concerned that is absolute rubbish What we have now are churches full of people who want to be there, rather than full of people who are there only because if they weren t there then the social stigma that attaches to them would be immense Granted, these days the opposite appears to be true, but to be honest with you, there are actually few people who mock me because I chose to regularly go to church We are not living in a time of wholesale apostacy when we have churches booming in Asia and Africa, and our Western churches becomingmulticultural as we speak Francis Schaeffer, back in the early 70s suggested that if Christ were to come then then he would have a lot of trouble finding faith on Earth To him I would point to Elijah who, during a time when he believed that nobody worshipped God, was taken to a cave which was full of faithful followers As for today, if somebody asks me the question as to if Christ were to return now whether he would find faith on Earth, my response would be bucket loads


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