The Shadow of the Sun ePUB Ó of the PDF Î The


10 thoughts on “The Shadow of the Sun

  1. Rowland Pasaribu Rowland Pasaribu says:

    The Shadow of the Sun originally published as Shadow of a Sun was A.S Byatt s first novel, published in 1964 but, as she explains in an introduction to the new edition of the book, written at least the first draft while she was an undergraduate at Cambridge 1954 to 1957 The two part tale sends its young heroine, Anna Severell, to Cambridge too though with considerably less success than Byatt had Her story can also be compared to another Byatt Cambridge lass, Frederica Potter in S The Shadow of the Sun originally published as Shadow of a Sun was A.S Byatt s first novel, published in 1964 but, as she explains in an introduction to the new edition of the book, written at least the first draft while she was an undergraduate at Cambridge 1954 to 1957 The two part tale sends its young heroine, Anna Severell, to Cambridge too though with considerably less success than Byatt had Her story can also be compared to another Byatt Cambridge lass, Frederica Potter in Still Life see our review Anna is the daughter of the renowned novelist Henry he s her distant and largely unknown father , and she does suffer some from being in his shadow She got herself kicked out of school for running away without telling anyone but over the course of the novel gets her act together a bit and does finally win a place at Cambridge One of the people to give her a push in that direction is Oliver Canning, a summer guest who comes to stay with the Severells with his wife, Margaret Oliver tutors Anna and helps her along over the summer it remains a fairly uneasy relationship of sulky girl and well meaning know it all Matters are complicated by the relationships between the adults Henry the artist and Oliver as friend and critic Oliver and his wife, who has to hide the glossy women s magazines she enjoys from her husband because he believed the reading of such papers to be positively morally wrong , and even Henry and his wife, Caroline The first part of the book focusses on the summer this group spends largely together Oliver and Anna work together much of the time, and eventually it is even suggested that Anna return with him and Margaret to London, as a sort of substitute daughter That comes to nothing, but much of the book is about Anna s attempt to escape from under her father s shadow and from the late adolescent listless and aimlessness that s taken hold of her at home Oliver warns that she must get away she ll just be a ghost, a shadow if she remains breathing her father s rarefied air The second part sees Anna at Cambridge, where she still can t find her way Here matters are complicated when Oliver again appears, and this time their relationship turns into a sexual and not quite romantic one Margaret s worries as her marriage collapses without her understanding much of what is going on and the Severell s concerns about their daughter add to the tension which culminate in Anna suffering the not too surprising consequences of a sexual relationship and then accepting a marriage proposal Yes, it does get almost melodramatic there for a while The strengths of the novel lie in numerous penetrating, strong scenes Byatt goes on at some length in analyzing characters and their actions, and much of this she does well There are also several nicely framed scenes a dark and rainy encounter between Anna and Oliver, lost Henry found again, a Cambridge party that doesn t go as hoped for though many of these are too obviously staged to fully convince The story, too, remains too artificial a forced novel plot conceived by someone who has read a good many novels but doesn t have any real material of her own yet Details ring true, especially about Anna, but the character is forced into circumstances Byatt clearly only imagined and at this stage she wasn t novelist enough to get away with relying so much on purely speculative imagination The novel plods along, in part, but on the whole is solid and a decent read Certainly of some interest


  2. Ruby Hollyberry Ruby Hollyberry says:

    As in the case of Zora Neale Hurston s Jonah s Gourd Vine, I think I like The Shadow of the Sun, A S Byatt s first book, the best of all Possession is muchcomplex, of course This is probably the most unadorned writing she has done, and it seems to getornate with every book I do love the complexity of her books But in this book are her first formulated philosophical ideas, her first and most pungent characters, the clearest and simplest definition of her plotting, and it works As in the case of Zora Neale Hurston s Jonah s Gourd Vine, I think I like The Shadow of the Sun, A S Byatt s first book, the best of all Possession is muchcomplex, of course This is probably the most unadorned writing she has done, and it seems to getornate with every book I do love the complexity of her books But in this book are her first formulated philosophical ideas, her first and most pungent characters, the clearest and simplest definition of her plotting, and it works Completely works It reminds me of not only my adored Rumer Godden books, as do all Byatt s novels, despite the fact that Byatt is admittedly better, but also of another great favorite of mine Colette Colette and Gide and Pater and Ruskin This book was the freshman project of Byatt when she was a recent college graduate, wife and mother, who like her character Stephanie in Still Life, and theminor character of Jenny in Virgin in the Garden, is desperately clinging to everything she learned in her English degree, brooding over it with intensified lust for the printed word because she can t immerse herself in literature any now that she is married and a mother of little babies The explicitly described experience of that waited to be depicted in later books, but the feelings are most noticeable here, despite the unrelated plot Her passion for English literature comes out in this in the writing, rather than in the incessant literary name dropping which I don t mind of most of her other books So straight from her own life comes plot and feeling with nothing to veil it, and I like it


  3. Moira Russell Moira Russell says:

    Possession is one of my favourite books, and, as I suspect is true for many people, it was the first novel of A.S Byatt s I ever read I bounced hard off nearly every single novel of hers I tried after that not just earlier ones this included The Biographer s Tale and A Whistling Woman Luckily I was quite fond of her short stories, else I might have given up on her for good Amusingly, years ago I carefully printed out the new Introduction to this version one of the rushed post P reiss Possession is one of my favourite books, and, as I suspect is true for many people, it was the first novel of A.S Byatt s I ever read I bounced hard off nearly every single novel of hers I tried after that not just earlier ones this included The Biographer s Tale and A Whistling Woman Luckily I was quite fond of her short stories, else I might have given up on her for good Amusingly, years ago I carefully printed out the new Introduction to this version one of the rushed post P reissues not realizing it was in the edition I already had That is how much I ignored novels of hers that were not P One end of summer project is for me to read all of her novels, especially the pre P books I have The Children s Book but am saving it as a special treat, because it is about SO MANY things that I love Pre Raphaelites WWI Victorian storytelling I m beginning with her first novel In order to avoid the Possession hangover I might reread it after I finish these it s been a while I ve decided to treat it as if it s in a bubble, and think of these booksas if they were written by Iris Murdoch or Muriel Spark or even Ivy Compton Burnett and so on That reminds me, I really need to read Rosamond Lehmann We ll see how it goes.P 15 HA I just had an actual writing ha in the margin moment, on page 9 He looked like a cross between God, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and Blake s Job, rsepectable, odd, and powerful all at once A bithopeful, altho Elizabeth s phrasing of a D.H Lawrence book without the sex almost made me give up before I began I did find it interesting that Byatt, according to her own introduction, said it was about the paradox of Leavis preaching Lawrence when they would have hated each other does anyone write books that way any, so concerned with one author answering another I like it P 100 I have, somewhat perversely, perhaps inevitably, entirely characteristically fallen in love with the book it s tangled and difficult and knotty Noone else likes it, let alone loves it You could spend hours trainspotting the literary references in any one chapter but seriously, it s wonderful I am amazed at critics and other readers who thought the characters were all cardboard, because they are nearly painfully real to me Henry the visionary Caroline the domestic Margaret the unlucky And Anna, oh, Anna, she s like a little pissy dark version of Ursula Brangwen, how could I not love her Anna s predicament at first looks entirely singular, the problem of being the child especially daughter of a Great Man, but really it is the one Byatt describes in the extremely autobiographical new preface, of being an intellectual woman in the fifties and sixties Anna can t lose herself in housewifery, whether in self sacrificial service to a genius like her mother or amiable mediocrity with a middle upper class I think partner, but as everyone keeps telling her, she s not a genius herself either, and she can t be a writer She is a sitting duck for someone like OliverI can t love Oliver as Byatt points out herself, in a novel written by a man he would probably be the hero, even the first person narrator Instead he is the villain, and opaque, and I want to blow him up every time he smirks onto the page Anna s problem is also inevitably one of class, whether or not the Genteel Woman should work as opposed to the working class women, who had to work to live I think Oliver is working class, altho it s hard to tell I forget whether F.R Leavis was The visual descriptions are superb, if occasionally overlong and too elaborate, and Byatt rather works the sun thing to death at one point I scrawled in the margin Henry is Moses I GET IT I GET IT there are a very few typos and occasionally the author gets tangled up in her commas she manages to keep a tight rein on the semicolons But it s extremely well done, especially for a first novel I have a soft spot for those, especially when they re written by favourite authors It s like viewing baby photos The other thing is there are quite a few funny bits I don t understand people who say Byatt has no sense of humour Granted, there are no extended comic scenes, and she has a savage sense of the ridiculous and absurd rather than a genial Lord what fools c c vision, but there are two or three nasty little one line swipes every few pages, like someone muttering imprecations under her breath you can just barely overhear It s fabulously undercutting Anna has mentioned Lawrence and I think he s popped up in the text a few times, but the other great influence on this novel is Hardy Byatt doesn t mention him at all in the preface, and so far he s mentioned in the narrative barely Henry s first book was a countryman s novel, after Hardy , but Anna can t help reminding me of all of Hardy s wonderful furious intelligent doomed heroines toochokengtitiktitikchokeng 176 Alas, hit what looks like a fairly bad plot snag not too bad, for it to occur this late on in a first novel, and it s a first novelist s mistake, the one of not being able to fully embody the mental processes of someone very different from the writer herself I m not convinced Henry would come to Margaret s aid, when he s spent most of his adult life being cosseted by Caroline and has been so very avoidant of everyone else in the book Perhaps someone pointed this problem out to Byatt, or she felt uneasy about it herself, because there are a few later paragraphs of uneasy reasoning some of which are along the very unconvincing lines that Henry felt he should do it just because it is so very uncharacteristic Uh, no It would be something if Margaret appealed to Henry, or represented something of Anna as Henry is clearly present in Oliver s attraction to Anna or even Oliver, both of whom he is farinvolved with, but we re repeatedly told in the novel how unappealing she is to him on a number of levels physical, mental, even aesthetic.D.H Lawrence was one thing he loved taking people up, bossing them around, telling them how to live their lives, battering through all their obstacles like a huge bearded ram He lived to be a crusading force for change in not just literature but reality, especially as presented in other individuals But Henry s not any kind of proselytizer or prophet and has shut himself off from even his own family completely and deliberately It could be his hesitant reaching out to Margaret is something he feels he should do after a lifetime of deliberately avoiding doing just that, but it just isn t presented very well It feelslike a novelist s drawing lines of connection, outside narrative forces intersecting through characters Anna and Henry, Anna and Oliver, Margaret and Oliver, Margaret and Henry rather than that narrative being generated naturally through the personalities themselves I think this is probably what most critics meant when they didn t like the characterization and felt the plot was forced that seems bizarre to me, because these people are very vividly drawn Caroline and Jeremy least well, but even they still have their three dimensional moments But in the kind of social manners plot Byatt finds herself winding up with X and Y have to meet to disturb Z and generate conflict, and the feeling is of the characters being moved like pieces around the board of Story rather than being driven by their own torments and desires.P 239 And the plot ROARS back into action with a vengeance A rather terrible and dispiriting climax, but perfectly characteristic of Anna and perhaps Oliver one feels he hasn t had many affairs, possibly and fitting nastily well into the obsessive themes of family and love and responsibility and children and what we now call parenting Wonder somewhat if Henry Severell is based even if just unconsciously on Leslie Stephen whose life Virginia Woolf felt stood in the way of hers The plot goes rushing on to its ugly and inevitable end like Anna Karenina s train bearing down I read on and on, not really wanting any of these people to come to harm well, it would be nice if Oliver was run over by a meat truck but greedily feeding on the tragedy A very predictable plot twist, but the author knows how predictable it is and uses that kind of fatedness for her own ends Very conventional but very well done


  4. Paul Dinger Paul Dinger says:

    I really liked this book Henry s daughter Anna runs away from her boarding school, he responds by running away into the woods himself, leaving his daughter to the tender mercy of an older friend Oliver who swoops in wanting to help, when really This book owes a lot of George Eliot s MiddleMarch and E M Forester s Room With A View and for all her bluster, Byatt isn t in their league, but this is a great first effort full of promise and verve.


  5. greg greg says:

    Haven t read any Byatt Let me treat you to another passage that screams out in affinity to the kind of contemplative assessment of experience, merging past and present, that I so enjoy After I went back to re read this passage, I felt it worthwhile to transcribe it to pay closer attention It is a mini essay on paying attention in the present and to the past, and the pitfalls therein The narrator is a 17 year old woman, wanting to be a writer like her famous, distant, and evidently bipolar f Haven t read any Byatt Let me treat you to another passage that screams out in affinity to the kind of contemplative assessment of experience, merging past and present, that I so enjoy After I went back to re read this passage, I felt it worthwhile to transcribe it to pay closer attention It is a mini essay on paying attention in the present and to the past, and the pitfalls therein The narrator is a 17 year old woman, wanting to be a writer like her famous, distant, and evidently bipolar father, but needing to find her independence from a protective and not particularly nurturing family The scene is the end of a long drive to the coast for a day picnic with family and friends, in an unspoiled village called St Anne The narrator s name is Anna, probably no coincidence Anna looked out at the pale and glittering strip of sea beyond the wall and wondered what she would most remember the very real bodily pleasure she had taken in the St Anne picnic in the early days, as a child, in sand and sea and climbing, in the sound of gulls and water in which she had been, she thought first, absolutely involved, or the enormous social discomfort it now caused her Looking at it through the car window distanced her, although she was there now, in the middle of it it was all overlaid with dust and scratches, like an old film, to be assessed, an object The empty square, patterned with jutting shadows where she was, white with sun towards the sea, was layered with mystery and importances for her the mystery which comes from collecting and choosing between, or attempting not to choose between memories.St Anne, where she had been first taken by Caroline her mother on a conventional picnic, had been for years Anna s dreamed retreat and edge of freedom It was the first place that she had recognized as beautiful probably because she had been told it was beautiful and now she carried with her as a touchstone the fined down image of all this emptiness and clarity, of the sudden, peculiarly poised rush of buildings to the edge of nothing and only horizon stretching beyond them, solid, shining metal blue, and the bodiless paler blue of the sky laid on it weightlessly She remembered the heaviness and darkness of the little church and its damp smell She remembered the smaller coves, and liked to sit lonely at the bottom of a funnel, enclosed, with high walls of chalk curving almost round her, but with the sky opening above and the sea bright through the gap.Over the years she had polished these three images so that now they were bright and easily accessible she had taken, in her way, possession of the place But her feeling for it was essentially a thing of the past Once, some time, she had found it violently beautiful, and now she found it so not because it hit her with the immediacy of that postulated moment in the past, but because it was weighted with the memory, and the nostalgia and the recreation of that moment She suspected, dimly, that in fact the moment of knowledge had never occurred, that she had never, directly, completely, taken anything in, that what she remembered was a whole series of half realized impressions or even later imaginings, which had little to do with any vision at the time and were much less compatible with her other memories the continual frustration of Jeremey s presence her younger brother , Caroline s insistence that she should enjoy herself, the heat and irritation of walking, scrambling, hurry to arrive and hurry to leave than any such vision would have been Perhaps the past as it really was, she thought, or this present, as it would be when it became the real past, were impossible to remember and not even very relevant Perhaps one built oneself out of what one constructed of what one had seen, and perhaps what one had done, or really felt, were only important in so far as they affected this Anna knew perfectly well what she meant by building herself it was what she must do what she could not find out was how To build oneself, it was maybeimportant to remember a whole vision than actually to have one Or maybe, on the other hand, to build on that was a lie It was certain that to care for things seen was important, but how seen If the way of seeing was artificial, a construct, what then She thought St Anne is beautiful for me now or will be, even , when I come to remembering, to reflecting on now but when I am honest I cannot remember having seen it as I believed I saw it.The Shadow of the Sun, A.S.Byatt p 104 ff, 2nd edition 1991 first published 1964 as Shadow of a SunSelective attention is such an important part of how we exist in our world Paying attention to everything dooms us to noisy overload at best Hardwired discrimination to notice only the unexpected helps us survive, while the torrent of unsurprising confirmations of our transient world view passes through our consciousness without sticking, like air through our lungs, each breath like the last, mostly unmemorable We can teach ourselves to override our involuntary attention triggers, ignoring or paying attention the way you might decide to notice your breathing And Byatt here refers to the analogous act of collecting or trying not to choose among your memories Fascinating This is a theme Byatt comes back to in her later work frequently the reality of narrative and mythology, as a constructed artform, in some waystrue than the shadow of reality that inspired the original.This edition includes some interesting autobiographical notes by Byatt describing her life at the time she wrote this, her first novel, as a student


  6. Jane Gregg Jane Gregg says:

    3.5 stars Byatt s first novel which, as she says, owes much to Elizabeth Bowen.


  7. Rachael Hunt Rachael Hunt says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Henry Severell is a particularly interesting character because of the ways in which he sees nature around him He often goes on walks, away from his family with no warning, exploring He just walks and walks as though he is convinced he must find something Something greater than this world He sees the shapes of things, and all things he believes have a greater significance than we realise It reaches a point where all natural things are weighing him down, where he feels as though the world is Henry Severell is a particularly interesting character because of the ways in which he sees nature around him He often goes on walks, away from his family with no warning, exploring He just walks and walks as though he is convinced he must find something Something greater than this world He sees the shapes of things, and all things he believes have a greater significance than we realise It reaches a point where all natural things are weighing him down, where he feels as though the world is crushing him and he cannot write a formed book any longer, he can only write notes, scrawls of what he sees in the moment, racing But then comes a time where he finds that he begins to be open not just to nature but to people He begins to understand what it is to feel the emotions that he always observed, and he begins to care and take responsibility of his own choices He is no longer just an outside observer he has begun to put himself openly into the world to feel and see what it is that he was always writing about He gains a new understanding of what is.Anna has spent seventeen years of her life hiding from herself and others Believing that she will never be good enough to become anything due to living in the shadow of her father and with her antagonistic mother Caroline refusing to take notice of anything in Anna s life apart from to look down on her with distaste, Anna became a miserable young woman who had no hope and did not believe that a good life would be possible Scared by feelings and then ignorant of them, she almost completely destroyed her life She is forced into an education that she does not want and has no passion for, and falls in love with Oliver She has spent her life running away Running out of fear that it is not possible to be strong in a world that seems to the negative minded to be intent on destruction But she sees Oliver again and knows that she will be alright She stops running She opens herself She lets love in And here her life truly begins.About 3 4 of the way through the novel I was made rather apprehensive by some rather inhuman actions and descriptions in lack of care However the ending was better than I thought it was going to be, and it came together well I loved to be reading the language of the 1960s although rather predictable as most 1960s novels seem to be , and appreciated the symbolism throughout the novel Overall, a good read


  8. Patricia Stewart Patricia Stewart says:

    The reader is introduced to a family expecting company Anna, the seventeen year old daughter, Jeremy, the younger brother, Henry, the father and author writer who seems to suffer with some sort of mental anguish due to being a prisoner of war and his wife Caroline who keeps people, places and things in a seemly ordered way.Henry, after some coaxing from Caroline stops his work and pick up the quests at the train station Margaret and Oliver Cannings with be the quests of honor for a couple of The reader is introduced to a family expecting company Anna, the seventeen year old daughter, Jeremy, the younger brother, Henry, the father and author writer who seems to suffer with some sort of mental anguish due to being a prisoner of war and his wife Caroline who keeps people, places and things in a seemly ordered way.Henry, after some coaxing from Caroline stops his work and pick up the quests at the train station Margaret and Oliver Cannings with be the quests of honor for a couple of summer weeks Henry is not pleased and neither is the daughter Anna They both seem to view the guests as an inconvenience.The story surrounds Anna, the daughter She is at a very tender age and doesn t quit know what to do with her life as yet It has been said she lives in the shadow of her father and his writing career feeling she may never live up to what she considers his high expectations Does she stay at home, does she leave, does she continue her education at Cambridge where her father attended collage Those who surround her are rather concerned and feel it is very vital for Anna to do something The one most concerned besides her mother is Oliver A strange and frightening relationship starts to develop between Oliver and Anna which will have consequences throughout the novel.The descriptions of the home and especially the outside are beautiful throughout the novel.The title of the book, The Shadow of the Sun, reminds me of the shadow side of one s personality The shadows have become broken and scattered about, the pieces are pieces of tragedies no one has dealt with


  9. Ashley Ashley says:

    I ve loved other books by A.S Byatt Possession, Virgin in the Garden, Children s Book, etc , but was a bit apprehensive about this one because the blurbs in the back were such left handed compliments, e.g This book is promising there are passages which seem to speak in a maturer voice, the voice perhaps of Mrs Byatt s third or fourth novel Given that I d loved her later works, I wasthan a bit concerned that this one would be youthful and awkward and not quite ripe.Fortunately for I ve loved other books by A.S Byatt Possession, Virgin in the Garden, Children s Book, etc , but was a bit apprehensive about this one because the blurbs in the back were such left handed compliments, e.g This book is promising there are passages which seem to speak in a maturer voice, the voice perhaps of Mrs Byatt s third or fourth novel Given that I d loved her later works, I wasthan a bit concerned that this one would be youthful and awkward and not quite ripe.Fortunately for both me and A.S Byatt, my fears were unfounded I loved this book as much as I ve loved her others Her voice, her ability to bring the reader into the mind of a character who isn t quite sure of herself, her deep understanding of character all of those are here, and seemed fully formed to me I m hoping that other editions of the book picked better blurbs for the back of the book it deserves better than the ones I read


  10. Dark-Draco Dark-Draco says:

    Found this a bit of a hard slog for the first section, not helped by the long chapters, but the pace picked up in the second and I found myself evenintrigued by the characters This is the story of Anna, the daughter of a famous writer, who struggles to make an identity and a life for herself It s a story where there is little action, but the characters go on a journey nontheless I have to say that I found Anna to be a bit annoying and too much of a wet blanket to be truly sympathetic to Found this a bit of a hard slog for the first section, not helped by the long chapters, but the pace picked up in the second and I found myself evenintrigued by the characters This is the story of Anna, the daughter of a famous writer, who struggles to make an identity and a life for herself It s a story where there is little action, but the characters go on a journey nontheless I have to say that I found Anna to be a bit annoying and too much of a wet blanket to be truly sympathetic to her plight I also didn t like the ending, even though it suited her perfectly A good read, but not that light Excellent for using up horrible winter nights


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The Shadow of the Sun [Epub] ➚ The Shadow of the Sun By A.S. Byatt – Thomashillier.co.uk This is the debut novel by the author of the bestselling Possession Byatt tells the story of troubled, sensitive seventeen year old Anna Severell, who struggles to discover and develop her own persona This is the of the PDF Î debut novel by the author of the bestselling Possession Byatt tells the story of troubled, sensitive seventeen year old Anna Severell, who struggles to discover and develop her own personality in the shadow of her father, a renowned novelist New Introduction by the Author.

  • Paperback
  • 324 pages
  • The Shadow of the Sun
  • A.S. Byatt
  • English
  • 05 April 2017
  • 0156814161

About the Author: A.S. Byatt

AS Byatt Antonia of the PDF Î Susan Byatt is internationally known for her novels and short stories Her novels include the Booker Prize winner Possession, The Biographer s Tale and the quartet, The Virgin in the Garden, Still Life, Babel Tower and A Whistling Woman, and her highly acclaimed collections of short stories include Sugar and Other Stories, The The Shadow Kindle - Matisse Stories, The Djinn in the Nightingale s Eye, Elementals and her most recent book Little Black Book of Stories A distinguished critic as well as a writer of fiction, A S Byatt was appointed CBE in and DBE in ATT, Dame Antonia Susan , Dame Antonia Duffy , DBE CBE FRSL Chevalier Shadow of the MOBI ó de l Ordre des Arts et des Lettres France , , writer born Aug Daughter of His Honour John Frederick Drabble, QC and late Kathleen Marie BloorByatt has famously been engaged in a long running feud with her novelist sister, Margaret Drabble, over the alleged appropriation of a family tea set in one of her novels The pair seldom see each other and each does not read the books of the otherMarriedst, , Ian Charles Rayner Byatt Sir I C R Byatt marriage dissolved one daughter one son deceased nd, , Peter John Duffy two daughtersEducationSheffield High School The Mount School, York Newnham College, Cambridge BA Hons Hon Fellow Bryn Mawr College, Philadelphia, USA Somerville College, OxfordAcademic Honours Hon Fellow, London Inst Fellow UCL, Hon DLitt Bradford, DUniv York, Durham, Nottingham, Liverpool, Portsmouth, London, Sheffield, Kent Hon LittD Cambridge, PrizesThe PEN Macmillan Silver Pen Of Fiction prize, for STILL LIFEThe Booker Prize, , for POSSESSIONIrish Times Aer Lingus International Fiction Prize, for POSSESSIONThe Eurasian section of Best Book in Commonwealth Prize, for POSSESSIONPremio Malaparte, Capri, Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature, California, for THE DJINN IN THE NIGHTINGALE S EYEShakespeare Prize, Toepfer Foundation, Hamburg, Publications The Shadow of the Sun, Degrees of Freedom, reprinted as Degrees of Freedom the early novels of Iris Murdoch, The Game, Wordsworth and Coleridge in their Time, reprinted as Unruly Times Wordsworth and Coleridge in their Time, Iris Murdoch The Virgin in the Garden, GEORGE ELIOT Selected Essays, Poems and Other Writings , editor Still Life, Sugar and Other Stories, George Eliot selected essays, editor Possession a romance, Robert Browning s Dramatic Monologues, editor Passions of the Mind, essays , Angels and Insects novellae ,The Matisse Stories short stories , The Djinn in the Nightingale s Eye five fairy stories, Imagining Characters, joint editor New Writing , joint editor Babel Tower, New Writing , joint editor The Oxford Book of English Short Stories, editor Elementals Stories of fire and ice short stories , The Biographer s Tale, On Histories and Stories essays , Portraits in Fiction, The Bird Hand Book, Photographs by Victor Schrager Text By AS Byatt A Whistling Woman, Little.