Moon and Sixpence PDF ´ Moon and ePUB ½

Moon and Sixpence [Reading] ➷ Moon and Sixpence Author W. Somerset Maugham – Thomashillier.co.uk Based on the life of Paul Gauguin, The Moon and Sixpence is W Somerset Maugham s ode to the powerful forces behind creative geniusCharles Strickland is a staid banker, a man of wealth and privilege He Based on the life of Paul Gauguin, The Moon and Sixpence is W Somerset Maugham s ode to the powerful forces behind creative geniusCharles Strickland is a Moon and ePUB ½ staid banker, a man of wealth and privilege He is also a man possessed of an unquenchable desire to create art As Strickland pursues his artistic vision, he leaves London for Paris and Tahiti, and in his quest makes sacrifices that leaves the lives of those closest to him in tatters Through Maugham s sympathetic eye Strickland s tortured and cruel soul becomes a symbol of the blessing and the curse of transcendent artistic genius, and the cost in humans lives it sometimes demands.


10 thoughts on “Moon and Sixpence

  1. Rajat Ubhaykar Rajat Ubhaykar says:

    Fair warning, this is going to be a long review for this is a book that is close to my heart written by an author whom I deeply admire.The Right TimeThere are some books that walk into your life at an opportune time I m talking about the books that send a pleasant shiver down your spine laden with Man, this is meant to be as you flip through its pages cursorily Or those that upon completion, demand an exclamation from every book reading fibre of your body to the effect of There couldn t ha Fair warning, this is going to be a long review for this is a book that is close to my heart written by an author whom I deeply admire.The Right TimeThere are some books that walk into your life at an opportune time I m talking about the books that send a pleasant shiver down your spine laden with Man, this is meant to be as you flip through its pages cursorily Or those that upon completion, demand an exclamation from every book reading fibre of your body to the effect of There couldn t have been a better time for me to have read this book Now, I come from deferred gratification stock So books like these, you don t read immediately, You let them sit there on your table for a while You bask in the warm expectant glow of a life altering read You glance at the book as you make your way to office, take pleasure in the fact that it ll be right there on your table when you open the front door wearily, waiting to be opened, caressed, reveled in And when that moment of reckoning arrives, you don t stop, you plunge yourself straight into the book, white hot passionate The Moon and Sixpence was just that kind of a book for me I had just completed and thoroughly enjoyed a course on Modern Art in college and could rattle off the names of Impressionist painters faster than I could the Indian cricket team I was particularly intrigued by Paul Gauguin, a French Post Impressionist painter, after reading one of his disturbingly direct quotes Civilization is what makes me sick , he proclaimed, and huddled off to Tahiti to escape Europe and all that is artificial and conventional , leaving behind a wife and five children to fend for themselves, never to make contact with them again This struck me as the ultimate expression of individuality, a resounding slap to the judgmental face of conservative society, an escapist act of repugnant selfishness that could only be justified by immeasurable artistic talent, genius, some may call it My imagination was tickled beyond measure and when I discovered there was a novel by W.Somerset Maugham the author of The Razor s Edge no less based on Gauguin, my joy knew no bounds I was in the correct frame of mind to read about the life of a stockbroker who gave up on the trivial pleasures of bourgeois life for the penury and hard life of an aspiring painter without considering him ridiculous or vain Supplied with the appropriate proportions of awe that is due to a genius protagonist, I began reading the book I have to admit I expected a whole lot from it I had a voyeuristic curiosity to delve into the head of a certified genius I was evencurious to see how Maugham had executed it At the same time, I was hoping that the book would raise and answer important questions concerning the nature of art and about what drives an artist to madness and greatness.The BookThe book s title is taken from a review of Of Human Bondage in which the novel s protagonist, Philip Carey, is described asso busy yearning for the moon that he never saw the sixpence at his feet I admired Maugham s narrative voice In his inimitable style, he flits in and out of the characters life as the stolid, immovable writer who is a mere observer, and nothingHis narrator defies Heisenberg s uncertainty principle as in observing his characters, he doesn t change their lives or nature one bit He has a mild disdain for the ordinary life of a householder and relishes his independenceI pictured their lives, troubled by no untoward adventure, honest, decent, and, by reason of these two upstanding, pleasant children, so obviously destined to carry on the normal traditions of their race and station, not without significance They would grow old insensibly they would see their son and daughter come to years of reason, marry in due course the one a peretty girl, future mother of healthy children the other a handsome, manly fellow, obviously a soldier and at last, prosperous in their dignified retirement, beloved by their descendants, after a happy, not unuseful life, in the fullness of their age they would sink into the grave That must be the story of innumerable couples, and the patter of life it offers has a homely grace It reminds you of a placid rivulet, meandering smoothly through green pastures and shaded by pleasant trees, till at last it falls into the vasty sea but the sea is so calm, so silent, so indifferent, that you are troubled suddenly by a vague uneasiness Perhaps it is only a kink in my nature, strong in me even in those days, that I felt in such an existence, the share of the great majority, something amiss I recognized its social value I saw its ordered happiness, but a fever in my blood asked for a wilder course There seemed to me something alarming in such easy delights In my heart was a desire to livedangerously I was not unprepared for jagged rocks and treacherous shoals if I could only have change change and the excitement of the unforeseen In Maugham s hands, Gauguin becomes Charles Strickland, an unassuming British stockbroker, with a secret unquenchable lust for beauty that he is willing to take to the end of the world, first to Paris and then to remote Tahiti He is cold, selfish and uncompromising in this quest for beautyThe passion that held Strickland was a passion to create beauty It gave him no peace It urged him hither and thither He was eternally a pilgrim, haunted by a divine nostalgia, and the demon within him was ruthless There are men whose desire for truth is so great that to attain it they will shatter the very foundation of their world Of such was Strickland, only beauty with him took the place of truth I could only feel for him a profound compassion However words such as these serve to romanticize Strickland s actions which at first glance, remain despicable view spoiler He leaves his wife as casually as one would leave to buy milk from the store, he betrays his only friend by eloping with his wife and then proceeds to drive her to suicide with his callousness hide spoiler Maugham paints him as a rogue loner, an unfathomable apparition, compelled to inhuman acts by the divine tyranny of artHe livedpoorly than an artisan He worked harder He cared nothing for those things which with most people make life gracious and beautiful He was indifferent to money He cared nothing about fame You cannot praise him because he resisted the temptation to make any of those compromises with the world which most of us yield to He had no such temptation It never entered his head that compromise was possible He lived in Parislonely than an anchorite in the deserts of Thebes He asked nothing from his fellows except that they should leave him alone He was single hearted in his aim, and to pursue it he was willing to sacrifice not only himself many can do that but others He had a vision Strickland was an odious man, but I still think he was a great one In these beautiful words he describes Strickland s strange homelessness and suggests a reason for his subsequent escape to TahitiI have an idea that some men are born out of their due place Accident has cast them amid strange surroundings, but they have always a nostalgia for a home they know not They are strangers in their birthplace, and the leafy lanes they have known from childhood or the populous streets in which they have played, remain but a place of passage They may spend their whole lives aliens among their kindred and remain aloof among the only scenes they have ever known Perhaps it is this sense of strangeness that sends men far and wide in the search for something permanent, to which they may attach themselves Perhaps some deep rooted atavism urges the wanderer back to lands which his ancestors left in the dim beginnings of history Sometimes a man hits upon a place to which he mysteriously feels he belongs Here is the home he sought, and he will settle amid scnes that he has never seen before, among men he has never known, as though they were familiar to him from his birth Here at last he finds rest By the end of the book, Maugham s narrator somewhat loses his grip over the reader and I could picture him in my mind floundering around the island of Tahiti, interviewing the people who came in contact with Strickland, trying to piece together a story He finds himself in the position of the biologist, who has to figure out from a bone, not only a creature s body, but also its habits The reader is promised the ineffable, a study of genius and is only delivered an admission of its elusive nature Also the tone of the novel tends to get slightly misogynistic in places But I suppose that isa failing of the protagonist rather than the author As compensation, Maugham offers delicious crisp cookies of wisdom throughout In simple lyrical language, he penetrates to the core of the human condition and offers invaluable advice to the aspiring writer, the hopeful lover and the wannabe genius.For its unpretentious, sympathetic and humane portrayal of a deeply flawed protagonist, its quotable quotes and its ironic humour, this book shall rank as my one of my favourite books on the life and development of an artist in search of the unknowable.My Master MaughamI strongly believe that the adjectives one throws around are a barometer of one s sensitivity or at the minimum, one s desire to be accurate Both of these qualities are indispensable to the aspiring writer because honestly, what is there to writing except fresh verbs, evocative adjectives, searing honesty and an unbounded imagination Also, that it s easier said than done.In this context, there are moments when I feel utterly stupid and unimaginative My inner monologues resemble the chatter of teenage girls in their lack of content and use of worn out adjectives I mean, awesome and amazing, like seriously Bleeuurghh During such exasperating times, my inner world aches to devour a mouthful of good looking words in the Queen s English I head to my dusty book closet and roughly displace its contents until I find a book either by one of the barons of British literature, a W.Somerset Maugham PG Wodehouse or a laid back satire along the lines of Yes Minister The book usually serves its purpose admirably It manages to extract me from my predicament by either making me split my sides laughing or by drowning me in a stream of sentences so beautifully constructed that I completely forget my insecurities and start shaking my head ponderously at the writer s virtuosity instead.Coming to the topic of the writer himself, W.Somerset Maugham is one of my favourite writers in the English language Being an aspiring writer who s yet to find his voice myself, his novels never fail to stab me with a hopeful optimism My premature belief, that I can write well, is reinforced when I read Maugham He never intimidates me or bores me, commonplace sins many writers will have to go to confession for While reading his prose, he possesses the singular ability of making the difficult art of writing seem pretty doable This, I ve realized with the passing of time, is due to one simple reason It is because W.Somerset Maugham never shows off Never Never does he ramble pointlessly Never does he merely graze the point instead of hitting it fair and square because he was too busy fooling around with the language Never He hits bulls eye with eloquence and a kind of frugal, flowing lyricism There is always a single minded purpose behind his writings It is to spin a mighty good yarn by getting the point across without making his readers consult a dictionary He even propounds profundity in a manner that typically makes me re read the paragraph and underline it to admire the economy and ease with which the thought was expressed in words I find the writing styles of Hemingway and Maugham similar in form, but while Hemingway s writing is austere to the point of being skeletal, Maugham clothes his words until they can be considered passably pretty.For his remarkable abilities, Maugham s opinions about his own writing were always modest He believed he stoodin the very first row of the second ratersAsked about his method of writing, he simplified it to a matter of keen observation and honest reproductionMost people cannot see anything,he once said,but I can see what is in front of my nose with extreme clearness the greatest writers can see through a brick wall My vision is not so penetrating My favourite excerptsAdvice to aspiring writersI forget who it was that recommended men for their soul s good to do each day two things they disliked it was a wise man, and it is a precept that I have followed scrupulously for every day I have got up and I have gone to bed But there is in my nature a strain of asceticism, and I have subjected my flesh each week to asevere mortification I have never failed to read the Literary Supplement of The Times It is a salutary discipline to consider the vast number of books that are written, the fair hopes with which their authors see them published, and the fate which awaits them What chance is there that any book will make its way among that multitude And the successful books are but the successes of a season Heaven knows what pains the author has been at, what bitter experiences he has endured and what heartache suffered, to give some chance reader a few hours relaxation or to while away the tedium of a journey And if I may judge from the reviews, many of these book are well and carefully written much thought has gone to their composition to some even has been given the anxious labour of a lifetime The moral I draw is that the writer should seek his reward in the pleasure of his work and in release from the burden of his thoughts and indifferent to aught else, care nothing for praise or censure, failure or success Until long habit has blunted the sensibility, there is something disconcerting to the writer in the instinct which causes him to take an interest in the singularities of human nature so absorbing that his moral sense is powerless against it He recognizes in himself an artistic satisfaction in the contemplation of evil which a little startles him but sincerity forces him to confess that the disapproval he feels for certain actions is not nearly so strong as his curiosity in their reasons The writer isconcerned to know than to judgeOn the ironic humour of lifeDirk Stroeve was one of those unlucky persons whose most sincere emotions are ridiculous On the nature of artWhy should you think that beauty, which is the most precious thing in the world, lies like a stone on the beach for the careless passer by to pick up idly Beauty is something wonderful and strange that the artist fashions out of the chaos of the world in the torment of his soul And when he has made it, it is not given to all to know it To recognize it you must repeat the adventure of the artist It is a melody he sings to you, and to hear it again in your own heart you want knowledge and sensitiveness and imagination


  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Moon and Sixpence, W Somerset MaughamThe Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W Somerset Maugham first published in 1919 It is told in episodic form by a first person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist The story is in part based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin The Moon and Sixpence, W Somerset MaughamThe Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W Somerset Maugham first published in 1919 It is told in episodic form by a first person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist The story is in part based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin 1970 1991 1333 263 1344 263 1362 334 1370 355 1376 1388 9789645960108 1393 284 9786006182216 1336 220


  3. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    W Somerset Maugham s Charles Strickland might not be heading onto my list of the most likeable characters in literature, but one thing is for sure, he is certainly one of the most memorable Strickland, a bourgeois city gent living in London has a dull, soulless exterior that conceals the fact he just may be a genius He devotes himself to himself, and hides within him a passion for painting that no one else seems to knows about He doesn t give a stuff about anybody, including his family, and W Somerset Maugham s Charles Strickland might not be heading onto my list of the most likeable characters in literature, but one thing is for sure, he is certainly one of the most memorable Strickland, a bourgeois city gent living in London has a dull, soulless exterior that conceals the fact he just may be a genius He devotes himself to himself, and hides within him a passion for painting that no one else seems to knows about He doesn t give a stuff about anybody, including his family, and his wife is left baffled when Charles suddenly travels to Paris and then later on Tahiti with no intentions to ever come back She believes he has run away with another woman, but the truth leaves her totally perplexed, after the narrator of Maugham s novel is sent after him, having only meet Strickland briefly before Derived from the life of Paul Gauguin, our main character is a man insensible to ordinary human relations, who lives the life of pure selfishness which is sometimes supposed to produce great art, which has always had its fascination for novelists inspired only by the unusual Accordingly there have been novels in plenty depicting the conflict of the abominable genius with the uncongenial environment, and Mr Maugham has followed a recognised convention in this story of an imaginary artist of posthumous greatness He treats him throughout with mock respect, and surrounds his affairs with contributory detail Maugham s story takes a respectable man who deserts his wife after seventeen years of marriage to get fully behind a great idea to turn himself into a famous artist, having previously had no experience His break is succeeded by living destitute with a stubborn determination, and by long periods of work and outbursts of savage behaviour Now, here s the thing, does Maugham convince us that Strickland is a real man and a real artist with which we can absorb his traits as part of the essential human creature who lives eternally by his work It seems he does not Where every detail should be pungently real, one is constantly checked in belief by the sense of a calculated and heightened effect, and by the passion of Maugham for his subject Such a passion is sometimes defeated by it s object Here one is repelled, not so much by Strickland s monosyllabic callousness, but by the knowledge that this callousness is seen and represented without subtlety This does eventually change towards the end, but what I liked about Maugham s narrative is he never succumbs to the obvious temptation to seek to explain Strickland s actions to us, we are left in the dark to his motives just like the other characters Another positive is that he uses the minor elements in the story with an extremely effective manner There are deeper themes going on here, if you dig hard enough.The novel is one of a destructive nature, and presents a really terrible philosophy on Modernism which it propounds, but I found it compulsively readable Maugham s writing manages to be both powerful and austere, with not a moment wasted I particularly liked the first person narrative voice, which captured me with a mix of admiration and disdain for Strickland, something that Maugham struck a masterful balance with


  4. Lyn Lyn says:

    I may not be able to tell a post impressionist painter from a post hole digger, but if I see a painting by Paul Gauguin I can usually identify it correctly.W Somerset Maugham s 1919 novel about fictional artist Charles Strickland is loosely based on the life of the French painter, but let s be honest, even though this is a novel and something of a caricature, it is the slings and arrows of Gauguin s outrageous life that make this so damn entertaining.That and Maugham s gifted writing and his de I may not be able to tell a post impressionist painter from a post hole digger, but if I see a painting by Paul Gauguin I can usually identify it correctly.W Somerset Maugham s 1919 novel about fictional artist Charles Strickland is loosely based on the life of the French painter, but let s be honest, even though this is a novel and something of a caricature, it is the slings and arrows of Gauguin s outrageous life that make this so damn entertaining.That and Maugham s gifted writing and his deft ability to describe human emotion and to add impressionistic detail to complex relationships Maugham s dialogue, always good, is here almost Dickensian in its narrative quality There are several scenes that were hypnotic, drawing the reader into an exchange between two characters Maugham introduces us to Charles Strickland, an English stockbroker who leaves his wife and children to move to Paris to learn to paint and to realize his dream, late in life, of being an artist Told in first person observations about Strickland over the course of many years, we follow Strickland s roguish adventures to Tahiti where his mastery is recognized.But Maugham describes a complicatedly simple man who just wants to live in his work Undesiring of money or fame, he simply wants to create and to express his artistic vision His philosophy, appearing on the surface to be hedonistic and misanthropic, isthan an esoteric isolation from society but is an all encompassing, passionate devotion to his work.This is not a biography of Gauguin, butof an examination of the spirit of his life, similar to how the Post Impressionists extended Impressionism while rejecting its limitations, using symbolism and abstraction to depict its subject.For Maugham readers, art lovers and the rest of us a good book


  5. Rowena Rowena says:

    Art is a manifestation of emotion, and emotion speaks a language that all may understand W Somerset Maugham,The Moon and SixpenceI d only ever read one Maugham before this Of Human Bondage but even with just that one read I could tell Maugham was a very special writer and destined to be one of my favourites I picked up this thin book thinking it would be a quick, simple read, but I wasn t prepared for the depth and profundity in it There is a lot going on in this little book, lots to Art is a manifestation of emotion, and emotion speaks a language that all may understand W Somerset Maugham,The Moon and SixpenceI d only ever read one Maugham before this Of Human Bondage but even with just that one read I could tell Maugham was a very special writer and destined to be one of my favourites I picked up this thin book thinking it would be a quick, simple read, but I wasn t prepared for the depth and profundity in it There is a lot going on in this little book, lots to think about.Reading the back of the book you ll know that the main character in this book, Charles Strickland, was modelled after Paul Gauguin There s no way I would have guessed that for most of the book, until Strickland Gauguin moved to Tahiti.Even without knowing much about Gauguin s life, this book was interesting as it took us on a tour of his life, done by a narrator who operates as an unofficial biographer, taking us through Strickland Gauguin s life from England to Paris, and finally Tahiti.Strickland is an awful person and extremely misogynistic It s been a while since I ve read such an odious character in literature I despised him He was a man without any conception of gratitude He had no compassion The emotions common to most of us simply did not exist in him, and it was as absurd to blame him for not feeling them as for blaming the tiger because he is fierce and cruel It was surprising to witness how the passion in Strickland seemed to remain dormant for years but eventually caused him to act like a man possessed and completely re evaluate his life as that passion needed an outlet That must be the story of innumerable couples, and the pattern of life it offers has a homely grace It reminds you of a placid rivulet, meandering smoothly through green pastures and shaded by pleasant trees, till at last it falls into the vasty sea but the sea is so calm, so silent, so indifferent, that you are troubled suddenly by a vague uneasiness Perhaps it is only by a kink in my nature, strong in me even in those days, that I felt in such an existence, the share of the great majority, something amiss I recognised its social values, I saw its ordered happiness, but a fever in my blood asked for a wilder course There seemed to me something alarming in such easy delights In my heart was a desire to livedangerously I was not unprepared for jagged rocks and treacherous shoals if I could only have change change and the excitement of the unforeseen Gauguin comes up a lot in discussions on primitivism and orientalism, and reading up on his time in Tahiti really leaves a bitter taste in my mouth The discussion on place and how we might be searching for a place where we are free to be really spoke to me, but Gauguin being himself meant taking child brides in the tropics, and that reminded me of the fact that Europeans had have free reign in some parts of the world all due to their perceived power But still, the idea that we can be perceived differently in different areas, and therefore besuited to one area than another, is interesting I have an idea that some men are born out of their due place Accident has cast them amid certain surroundings, but they have always a nostalgia for a home they know not They are strangers in their birthplace, and the leafy lanes they have known from childhood or the populous streets in which they have played, remain but a place of passage They may spend their whole lives aliens among their kindred and remain aloof among the only scenes they have ever known Perhaps it is this sense of strangeness that sends men far and wide in the search for something permanent, to which they may attach themselves Perhaps some deep rooted atavism urges the wanderer back to lands which his ancestors left in the dim beginnings of history Sometimes a man hits upon a place to which he mysteriously feels that he belongs Here is the home he sought, and he will settle amid scenes that he has never seen before, among men he has never known, as though they were familiar to him from his birth Here at last he finds rest It s hard to summarize this book without bringing up the racist language There were quite a few racial epithets which, I m not sure spoke of Maugham s insensitivity to different races, or just that he was reflecting the language and sentiments of the time Either way, they were shocking, and I could have done without them


  6. Jeff Jeff says:

    Beauty is something wonderful and strange that the artist fashions out of the chaos of the world in the torment of his soul And when he has made it, it is not given to all to know it To recognize it you must repeat the adventure of the artist It is a melody that he sings to you, and to hear it again in your own heart you want knowledge and sensitiveness and imagination Beauty is in the eye of the beholder In addition to plenty of witty bon mots, Maugham dropped several lengthy quotes on tBeauty is something wonderful and strange that the artist fashions out of the chaos of the world in the torment of his soul And when he has made it, it is not given to all to know it To recognize it you must repeat the adventure of the artist It is a melody that he sings to you, and to hear it again in your own heart you want knowledge and sensitiveness and imagination Beauty is in the eye of the beholder In addition to plenty of witty bon mots, Maugham dropped several lengthy quotes on the nature of beauty and how relative it is, especially through the eyes of the artist Maugham s protagonist, Charles Strickland grows indifferent to pretty much everything in his life wife, children, luxury, polite society and focuses his passions like a laser on the creation of a vision that s perceptible to pretty much only him Few others see it, but Strickland doesn t care he s too focused on the creative process to pay anyone any mind He s kind of a brute, who can only articulate his inner perception on the canvas.Strickland s a complete ass, losing pretty much all sense of propriety, not caring whether he s mortally offended anyone who s willing to lend him a hand, biting that hand with a furious chomp leaving broken lives in his wake The further he runs from society to Tahiti a magical place and it s distractions, the closer he comes to being able to extract his conception of pure beauty from the dark recesses of his mind.I ve known people like Strickland talented, brilliant, corrosive people who have that weird light surrounding themselves Friends and family that have been taken advantage of, cheated, hurt, yet still can t shake being in the presence of this person it s like having one foot in a tornado The narrator, a writer, who s been offended by Strickland on numerous occasions still comes around for the proverbial bitch slap Strickland doesn t achieve success and recognition until after he s dead, his family willing to whitewash his transgressions, something that probably wouldn t surprise or bother him.The only other Maugham I ve ever read is The Razor s Edge, that one was a passable read with the same format first person narrative observer, main character in search of some sort of truth , but this book has a kinetic energy and spirit You might loathe Strickland and want to throat punch him, but you still have a deep unspoken understanding of his motivations, that although you don t fully condone, you still respect his vision Buddy Read with the artsy, occult branch of the Pantsless Legion of Indecency Ginger, Kristin, and Stepheny


  7. Mary Mary says:

    We want the world We want it all We want the moon And still it s not enough.It s my long term goal to read everything Maguham wrote, a goal that I doubt will be very difficult to reach He writes with such poignant observation and wit and in The Moon and Sixpence he captures the all encompassing, obsessive and brutal nature that perhaps it takes to be an artist.Told by an unnamed narrator, we are introduced to Charles Strickland, a beastly yet seemingly ordinary man who one day leaves his wif We want the world We want it all We want the moon And still it s not enough.It s my long term goal to read everything Maguham wrote, a goal that I doubt will be very difficult to reach He writes with such poignant observation and wit and in The Moon and Sixpence he captures the all encompassing, obsessive and brutal nature that perhaps it takes to be an artist.Told by an unnamed narrator, we are introduced to Charles Strickland, a beastly yet seemingly ordinary man who one day leaves his wife, his children, his job and his entire life to paint The drive to create is all there is in him, and leaving a trail of destruction he goes to Paris don t they all and then to Tahiti He is displaced, disassociated and curiously unappealing It is a wonderful and extreme portrait of the innate need some have to follow their calling, or better still, the lack of choice they have to do so I have an idea that some men are born out of their due place Accident has cast them amid certain surroundings, but they have always a nostalgia for a home they know not They are strangers in their birthplace,and the leafy lanes they have known from childhood or the populous streets in which they played, remain but a place of passage They may spend their whole lives aliens among their kindred and remain aloof among the only scenes they have ever known Perhaps it is this sense of strangeness that send men far and wide in search for something permanent, to which they may attach themselves p.135


  8. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Moon and Sixpence, W Somerset Maugham The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W Somerset Maugham first published in 1919 It is told in episodic form by a first person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist The story is in part based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin The Moon and Sixpence, W Somerset Maugham The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W Somerset Maugham first published in 1919 It is told in episodic form by a first person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist The story is in part based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin 1970 1991 1333 263 1344 263 1362 334 1370 355 1376 1388 9789645960108 1393 284 9786006182216 1336 220


  9. Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell says:

    Instagram Twitter FacebookPinterestI m working my way through an omnibus edition of Maugham s work, and man, he can write I m torn between the impulse to swim leisurely through his prose or just gleefully cannonball into it Unlike some writers of this time, Maugham is not particularly flowery, but he has an interesting way of presenting ideas and constructing sentences that makes you want to read over them several times, just to appreciate their ideas and form.MOON AND Instagram Twitter FacebookPinterestI m working my way through an omnibus edition of Maugham s work, and man, he can write I m torn between the impulse to swim leisurely through his prose or just gleefully cannonball into it Unlike some writers of this time, Maugham is not particularly flowery, but he has an interesting way of presenting ideas and constructing sentences that makes you want to read over them several times, just to appreciate their ideas and form.MOON AND SIXPENCE, which could just as easily be called Portrait of the Artist as a Douche, is based loosely off the life of the artist, Paul Gauguin I tried to pronounce his name several times, ineffectively, ranging from gewgaw, to Google, to gaijin As it turns out, the way it s actually pronounced makes him sound like a creature from a Japanese monster movie it rhymes with Rodan , which is only the first way this book surprised me.Strickland seems like he has the ideal of the moderately successful life a wife, children, a good job with steady pay But he is discontent, and one day, coldly decides to leave his wife and job and go to Paris, living in squalor Why So he can paint The confusion of his family, neighbors, and the narrator himself is palpable To paint Not because of madness, or because of another woman but just for art For art s sake, and not for fame The narrator follows Strickland, as he wrecks yet another marriage, paintsart, and eventually goes to Tahiti, where he finds the climate agreeable and even obtains one of the locals as a wife The whole time he is cruel and scornful, dismissive of others feelings, wants, or desires, and even his own comfort Everything must be sacrificed for art Ultimately, I d say this is a tragedy, because that vision ends up consuming Strickland he pours his entire being into his art, and like many artists, it isn t until he s dead that his work becomes first a curiosity and then something farpowerful.A lot of my friends did not enjoy this book and I can certainly see why Strickland is a jerk, and so is the narrator There s a casually dismissive attitude towards the things that people generally consider worthy in a human being compassion, empathy, loyalty, family, kindness, charity, etc Art here is portrayed as something wholly selfish, and the message here seems to be that it is somehow okay that an artist is allowed to be an egotist, because self absorption is necessary for introspection I don t like that message, so I can see why some people might write off MOON AND SIXPENCE as too dark and grim and irritating However, I found myself fascinated by these terrible characters.I enjoyed this book a lot I ve read Maugham before and really liked his work, so this isn t really surprising His other book wasof a comedy of manners, though it was nothing like this I m really looking forward to working my way through his repertoire and seeing how his stories vary, while enjoying his beautiful writing and compelling, yet flawed characters.4 stars


  10. Henry Avila Henry Avila says:

    How much do we forgive a great, talented artist who is also a despicable human being Will his admirers look the other way, thinking since he is no longer around and noharm can be done by him, it is all right now to forgive and forget, besides he didn t do anything to their family but to other peopleShakespeare said, The evil that men do lives after them the good is oft interred with their bones Englishman Charles Strickland a thinly disguised Paul Gauguin, is one of those men, se How much do we forgive a great, talented artist who is also a despicable human being Will his admirers look the other way, thinking since he is no longer around and noharm can be done by him, it is all right now to forgive and forget, besides he didn t do anything to their family but to other peopleShakespeare said, The evil that men do lives after them the good is oft interred with their bones Englishman Charles Strickland a thinly disguised Paul Gauguin, is one of those men, selfish, cruel, disloyal an unfeeling cad you would loathe if you had ever met, nothing matters but his art, everyone else he can and does step on to reach his higher calling, being a superb painter yet nobody believes in his abilities, they see only a primitive man with the same tendencies on canvas, besides there are hundreds of better painters in Paris Strickland had abandoned his wife and two children in London, leaving his family without any means of support if they starved he wouldn t care, nothing is really important but his destiny, set at the turn of the 20th century, Somerset Maugham does not try to hide the fact that he is the person narrating this novel Having briefly met Strickland in London when the future legend was just another boring, ordinary, nonentity a monosyllabic stockbroker, who could guess of his later fame Maugham isimpressed by the charming Mrs.Strickland though not pretty, she does radiate what the perfect Englishwoman should be in that era Later the shocked lady embraces the rumors that her husband had fled with a young shop girl to France , she could not face the truth which would be humiliating.Mr Strickland had secretly gone because he needed to paint In Paris living in squalor in an one room, filthy, pungent, airless apartment he ekes out a living by guiding curious Englishmen, to the sordid sections of the city that no respectable person would go, the kind of areas policemen hate foreigners to see This or any other jobs which puts money in his hands,so for buying things to continue painting than to eat or pay the rent, he has lost much weight to rather an unhealthy level None buys his paintings however he doesn t care Finally meeting a bad Dutch painter the humane Dirt Stroeve, who actually sells his mediocre paintings, short, plumb, gregarious he never takes it personally when fellow artists disparage his product Still his English wife Blanche does, she has a checkered past and this type of woman can t forgive the man that saved her, Dirt An ailing Strickland becomes dangerously ill, he is nursed by the generous Dutchman, the only person who perceives his genius in is own home, the reluctant wife helps, the life of this scoundrel will not end here, he pays back his huge debt by taking away his Blanche Maugham who is now living in Paris, and becomes friends with the always kindly Dirt, writing a play there, isupset than her husband, he will forgive if she returns but tragedy ensues Strickland somehow gets on a ship and after much travels arrives in the beautiful, tropical, south seas island of TahitiYears pass, nothing is heard about this fugitive from civilization until during WWI, Somerset Maugham at his government s request, goes to the same island that Strickland was on, there the paintings he had been indifferent to shocks his senses, the sparkling, plethora of colors, the blues, greens, yellows, reds, violets, and whites, bright, brilliant, a glorious stream of unending shades it teases the mind and makes him dizzy, this, never captured before so well on canvasnow he has seen the real Strickland


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