Sharpe's Rifles PDF ↠ Paperback


  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • Sharpe's Rifles
  • Bernard Cornwell
  • English
  • 10 October 2019
  • 0006176976

10 thoughts on “Sharpe's Rifles

  1. Alex Cantone Alex Cantone says:

    Sharpe knew himself to be a tough man, but he had always thought of himself as a reasonable one, yet now, in the mirror of William s nervousness, he saw himself as something far worse a bullying man who would use the small authority of his rank to frighten men In February 1809 the British army under Sir John Moore is routed by Napoleon s forces and is in retreat to the port of La Coruna in North west Spain s Galicia region, hoping to escape in Dunkirk fashion back to England Lieutenant Richard Sharpe knew himself to be a tough man, but he had always thought of himself as a reasonable one, yet now, in the mirror of William s nervousness, he saw himself as something far worse a bullying man who would use the small authority of his rank to frighten men In February 1809 the British army under Sir John Moore is routed by Napoleon s forces and is in retreat to the port of La Coruna in North west Spain s Galicia region, hoping to escape in Dunkirk fashion back to England Lieutenant Richard Sharpe and the men of the 95th Rifles under his command become separated from the bulk of the troops, and are trapped at a river crossing, saved by Spanish Cazadores, led by the charismatic aristocrat Don Blas Vivar Sharpe wants to head south to the border with Portugal to join the British garrison at Lisbon, a decision at odds with his men who distrust an officer risen from the ranks, and he is equally despised by officers of allied armies and the enemy alike Vivar enlists them to first head west to accompany his men carrying a strongbox which, the Riflemen believe, contains gold and jewels to prevent it falling into the hands of the enemy Progress is slow and arduous, avoiding the roads, and they encounter a gutted village where they see at first hand the savagery of the French against the peasants They journeyed through the night, climbing ever higher and always into the teeth of a wind that brought the chill from the snow which lay in the gullies of the upper slopes Past midnight, from a wooded spur, Sharpe saw the far off gleam of the western sea Much closer, and beneath him in the dark tangle of the lowlands, a smear of camp fires betrayed where men were bivouacked The French, Vivar said softly.Vivar, a passionately religious man, rails against Sharpe an agnostic , but then they are side tracked by an English couple and their niece, dour Methodist missionaries, there to convert the Spanish away from Papism, with little success.The French are persistent and Sharpe realises that they are after the coveted strongbox they have been duped to protect Finally, in a high country fortress disused for centuries, Vivar reveals its contents and their destination as the city of Santiago St James the patron saint of Spain de Compostello field of stars , which he is to use as a rallying point, invoking the spirit of St James to help the Spanish rid the country of the French, as he had nine centuries earlier against the Moors Naturally, some Spaniards disagree, seeing the French as enlightened and progressive.This is a novel on many levels, binding history with fiction At its centre, a brilliant soldier and tactician, leadership thrust upon him yet with barely the skills to lead, who needs to gain the respect of his men The reader follows his progress, from self doubt to victory in battle and there are several of those Secondly, there is the attention to detail, of weaponry and uniform the Riflesmen s tattered rags and boot soles wound with twine, contrasting with the finery of the enemy We learn what they eat bare rations supplemented from what they glean from the land or are given by villagers Then there are the smells of warfare blood, vomit, horses chaffed and ridden almost to death and taking the brunt of the attack not recommended for animal lovers Finally there is the location itself, Santiago de Compostello, the destination of pilgrim tracks from across Europe for 1200 years, now UNESCO listed and visited by millions Verdict a read to be savoured, not rushed


  2. Jim Jim says:

    More of a 2.5, but definitely my least favorite of the series so far I didn t care for the reader, Fredrick Davidson, which didn t help While he was tolerable, his Spanish voices were very low, gravelly, almost unintelligible at times, while all his Irish voices were very high lilting Since one of the Irishmen was a really big, tough sergeant, the high voice didn t fit my image of a red haired Lee Marvin well.Sharpe wasn t shown in a very good light for most of the book the historical a More of a 2.5, but definitely my least favorite of the series so far I didn t care for the reader, Fredrick Davidson, which didn t help While he was tolerable, his Spanish voices were very low, gravelly, almost unintelligible at times, while all his Irish voices were very high lilting Since one of the Irishmen was a really big, tough sergeant, the high voice didn t fit my image of a red haired Lee Marvin well.Sharpe wasn t shown in a very good light for most of the book the historical afterword basically said that it didn t happen that way One of the things that I like about the Sharpe books is that they usually DID happen that way, with a few minor changes to put Sharpe into the action The sinking feeling in my stomach when I heard the news told me just how much I like that have come to rely on Cornwall s historical accuracy It s kind of the point for me.There were quite a few editorial goofs, too For example, an officer was herding his men by hitting them with the edge of his saber It was pretty obvious from the context the results that it was the flat Caltrops don t just stick into the soft frog of a horse s hoof, but also into the sole, yet several times it was put that way Irritating I listened to book 3, Sharpe s Fortress, just before this My library doesn t have books 4 5 in audio format, but I read the 5th, Sharpe s Prey some years ago The next audio book I have is 9, Sharpe s Gold I think I ll take a break for a while maybe come up with book 7 or 8 in the meantime


  3. Carol Storm Carol Storm says:

    This read almost like an origins story for Sharpe It shows how he first took command of the Rifles, how Sergeant Harper because his best friend, and how the British army began the long process of driving Napoleon and the French out of Spain The best thing about this book by far was actually nothing to do with Sharpe it was the way the author describes the uprising against the French The way the Spanish peasants ambush and savagely assault the regular French troops has a disturbingly modern This read almost like an origins story for Sharpe It shows how he first took command of the Rifles, how Sergeant Harper because his best friend, and how the British army began the long process of driving Napoleon and the French out of Spain The best thing about this book by far was actually nothing to do with Sharpe it was the way the author describes the uprising against the French The way the Spanish peasants ambush and savagely assault the regular French troops has a disturbingly modern feel Sharpe is actuallyof a war correspondent than a soldier in a lot of this, as he makes you feel like you are right there and witnessing history It s amazing when you compare this book to so called literary works like HOMAGE TO CATALONIA by George Orwell or THERE YOUR HEART LIES by Mary Gordon Those books are bout the Spanish Civil War but Spain never comes to life when Mary Gordon or George Orwell write about it They really don t like the Spanish people or care about them Bernard Cornwell makes you understand why Spain is so unique and why the people resisted Napoleon On the other hand, all the writing about Sharpe and Louisa and Don Blas is unbelievably bad Bernard Cornwell knows nothing about women, nothing about love, and nothing about how people interact with each other on even the most basic levels It was like wincing on every page to see him try to sell the idea that Sharpe even likes Louisa, let alone that he loves her And of course he shows the girl as being two faced, flighty, selfish, and childish all the time he s pretending that Sharpe likes her It s so bizarre, like Cornwell thinks he has to put a desirable young woman in the book just to maintain the fiction that Sharpe is a real man Yet he never seems to relax when women are around He s so resentful and defensive all the time And there was one really grotesque scene in a tavern where Sharpe is groping a Spanish whore in front of Don Blas, just to show off And it was literally a scene a creepy twelve year old boy would make up for the same reason because that s how men behave Normally I totally hate feminists who talk about stuff like rape culture, but thanks to Sharpe I see what they mean Thanks a lot, Sharpe


  4. Rob Rob says:

    Number 6 in the Sharpe series.This story takes place just after the French defeated the British at the battle of Corunna in 1809 The British are in disarray trying to get to safety via the coast where the British fleet is waiting to evacuate the defeated army The 95th Rifles are separated from the main army and are being harassed by French dragoons There are constant rearguard skirmishes which are taking a toll on the troops of the 95th In one skirmish the last, but one, officer is killed T Number 6 in the Sharpe series.This story takes place just after the French defeated the British at the battle of Corunna in 1809 The British are in disarray trying to get to safety via the coast where the British fleet is waiting to evacuate the defeated army The 95th Rifles are separated from the main army and are being harassed by French dragoons There are constant rearguard skirmishes which are taking a toll on the troops of the 95th In one skirmish the last, but one, officer is killed The last officer standing is Lt Richard Sharpe Up to this point Lt Sharpe was the company quartermaster Look down on by his fellow officer because he was promoted from the ranks He is also ignored by the rank and file because he s nothing but a jumped up soldier, just like themselves They bitterly resent being told what to do by a pretend officer.If these men are to survive, Sharpe has to gain the respect of these men and soon.Whilst struggling with the bitter cold in the Spanish mountains Sharpe and his men fall in with a group of Spanish soldiers The Spanish troops are on a mission to plant the flag of Santiago in the French garrisoned town of Santiago de Compostela Although he feels that this is nothingthan a pipe dream, Sharpe feels he has no choice but to fall in with the Spaniards.As usual, there is a young attractive woman, but for once, she is immune to Richard s masculine appeal Falling instead for the dashing commander of the Spanish troops.This, once again, is a fast paced, rollicking adventure Comes with a 4 star recommendation


  5. Jason Koivu Jason Koivu says:

    If you re not going to start at the beginning, this is a great place to start Bernard Cornwell s long running Napoleonic War series The events in Sharpe s Rifles take place when European hostilities between the French and English really took off, and it also contains the initial meeting between our hero Sharpe and his trusty sidekick Harper Besides that, it s just a solid book in this truly action packed series.


  6. Kate Sherrod Kate Sherrod says:

    He might not be a born officer, but by God he was a born soldier He was the son of a whore, bereft of God, but a God damned soldier I ve decided that the best way to approach the Sharpe series in which the publication order differs so radically from the publication order as to seem all but an exercise in randomization the way one does when reading stories about Conan the Cimmerian There might be some narrative carry over from novel to novel, but it s best to just regard them as discret He might not be a born officer, but by God he was a born soldier He was the son of a whore, bereft of God, but a God damned soldier I ve decided that the best way to approach the Sharpe series in which the publication order differs so radically from the publication order as to seem all but an exercise in randomization the way one does when reading stories about Conan the Cimmerian There might be some narrative carry over from novel to novel, but it s best to just regard them as discrete stories that happen to be about a guy with the same name andor less the same character.I say this because Sharpe s Rifles is the point where a lot of people who have chosen to read these books in chronological order start complaining about inconsistencies The book was written some half a dozen years after those of the original core series, but cast as a prequel to them and the books I ve read so far were written many, many years after this one, but take place earlier in Sharpe s career.So in a lot of ways, the Richard Sharpe in Sharpe s Rifles bears little resemblance to the character I ve grown to love through his adventures in India, at sea, and in Denmark, except in the ways described in the ur Cornwellian sentence I quoted at the beginning of this post He s still pretty uncouth and brutal, still an all but conscience less and cold blooded killer, but he seems only to have honed those qualities from his prior adventures but not to have experienced the character building that came with them To wit he is unsure in his authority though it could be argued that the years he has spent as a downtrodden Quartermaster for the 95th Rifles might have eroded the confidence he gained in India and Denmark , a complete sucker for anything in a skirt see my asterisk below and taking lessons in leadership from the Spanish major Bias Vivar that he really ought already to have absorbed from the good examples of his protectors in India like McCandless.But these are small quibbles, and become meaningless once one has agreed to treat the novels as things outside of time and narrative continuity Especially when the material at hand is so good, as it is here For Sharpe s Rifles has everything I ve come to expect from a Sharpe story over the top adventure here a ragtag band of survivors of a famous retreat across Spain is teaming up with a small but elite cadre of the Spanish army commanded by the aforementioned Don Bias on a mission to bring a Holy McGuffin to the Cathedral at Santiago de Compostella and thus create a new legend to inspire the Spanish peasantry to rise up against the hated French invaders , internecine bickering, inspired combat tactics, cold chivalry among enemies, and all the fighting, drinking and swearing if not, this time, the whoring one might expect from a good piece of military fiction.Here, too, is an origin story of sorts, though its significance is lost to chronological readers who have not osmotically absorbed a certain level of meta knowledge about the series for it is here that Sharpe and his gonna be best friend, Sergeant Harper, meet for the first time And it s a pretty good meet as those go Harper almost stages a mutiny against Sharpe but it s still not as good as Aubrey and Maturin and the concert at Port Mahon But that s maybe not a fair comparison, right I m sure back in the 1980s when only the original core Peninsular War books existed, fans of Sharpe Harper were delighted to observe this meeting, but for us chronological readers starting in the 21st century, it will never have the same power.Still, cracking good stuff Again, lots of explorations of how the rifle changed warfare, and how swords still matter, even if one sword is in the hand of a guy astride a big horse and the other in the hand of a guy on foot who ran out of ammo or out of time to reload his weapon, lots of amusing ruses de guerre and then there s the attack on Santiago itself, which doesn t hold a candle to the big set piece battles we saw in India, but is still very satisfying indeed.Truly, Sharpe never disappoints At least, thank goodness, his prior adventures don t involve a lot of ret conning the allusions to his deeds in India, at Seringapatam and Gawalghur, etc match up with the stories I ve read Well, except for Lady Grace, his lover from Sharpe s Waterloo who died after giving him a son before Sharpe s Prey I m pretty sure that once you ve bedded a gorgeous noblewoman you re not going to be so terribly overawed by a mere member of the impecunious country gentry, however mischievous and cute


  7. Brad Brad says:

    I am reading the Sharpe books in chronological order and have just reached


  8. Nate Nate says:

    Sharpe s Rifles starts in 1809 with the Peninsular War in Spain already raging For those who aren t familiar, the Peninsular War was one of the big conflicts of the Napoleonic Wars, with basically Britain, Spain, and Portugal duking it out with the French on the Iberian Peninsula When we join our hero, the Spanish armies are destroyed and the British are already outnumbered and on the retreat from the French hordes Due to some typical snobbish officer dumbassery, Sharpe and a small group of R Sharpe s Rifles starts in 1809 with the Peninsular War in Spain already raging For those who aren t familiar, the Peninsular War was one of the big conflicts of the Napoleonic Wars, with basically Britain, Spain, and Portugal duking it out with the French on the Iberian Peninsula When we join our hero, the Spanish armies are destroyed and the British are already outnumbered and on the retreat from the French hordes Due to some typical snobbish officer dumbassery, Sharpe and a small group of Riflemen are cut off after an attack on the British rearguard by French cavalry, and must ally with a charismatic Spanish major with his own dangerous mission.Chronologically speaking, this is a new kind of story in the series it s one where Sharpe is in a significant position of command He s ultimately the one making the decisions, whether or not the Rifles like it Cornwell presents the trials and tribulations of having command of a group of people in a wartime setting very well, and it s great to watch Sharpe deal with them This book really feels like we re getting into the meat and potatoes of the series now Sharpe s experiences in the Napoleonic Wars The naval voyage, espionage, and small military engagements of the previous books are great stories for the character to shine in but at his heart Sharpe is a soldier above all things, as Cornwell is fond of reminding us.This entry was definitely one of the most entertaining of the series so far, things start out explosive and disorienting and Sharpe and his men struggle violently to survive in war torn Spain I loved Blas Vivar, the Spanish Major that Sharpe falls in with early in the book He s charismatic, stubborn, funny, brave and I enjoyed his stories about his ancestors and the Reconquista Together they predictably wreak havoc on the French in a series of gripping encounters When you think Napoleon you usually think big scale set piece battles but a lot of fighting in the Peninsular War was just mean and nasty guerrilla warfare really, the perfect setting for Sharpe.All of that good stuff makes this one of my favorite Sharpe books so far Then the other shoe dropssome of my friends on this site will be completely aware of how irritating I find the love stories in these books This one was just utterly vapid and pointless If I remember correctly there was even a scene where Sharpe first meets this girl and the chapter ended with something like And Richard Sharpe was in love and I just wanted to fucking hurl the book in disgust Please understand this is not some macho knee jerk reaction to the concept of love stories When well done, they can either add a wonderful level of dimension and emotional reaction from the reader or even stand as fully formed and satisfying stories in their own stead The love stories in these books will NEVER accomplish either of those things I don t get why Cornwell keeps insisting on doing this shit It literally adds nothing at this point I liked some of the stuff with Grace but this needs to stop It would even betolerable if Cornwell handled it in a James Bond type manner, where Sharpe is just basically trying to get laid but he s not It s almost insulting at this point how Cornwell demands on putting these subplots in every book and it s also a testament to how much I like these books that I m willing to put up with this bullshit.So yeaha very fun but clearly flawed entry in the series I m obviously gonna read another one of these in like a week or two and see what happens when the war heats up and how Sharpe continues to grow as a commander It s so hard to describe what makes him such a compelling character he just utterly lacks pretense and has this vicious, scary desire to live and fight while also managing to somehow be likable and approachable, but can also be cold as ice and has straight up committed murder at this point in the series to further his own goals It s that kind of uncomfortable but compelling complexity that makes him my favorite Cornwell character


  9. Mike Mike says:

    I ve read many of his other series Grail Quest, Saxon, Warlord, etc but have not read any of the Sharpe s Rifles until now Typically great fighting scenes, good characters, strong story Brings the period to life Now to find a bunch to acquire and readeventually 3 Stars


  10. Algernon (Darth Anyan) Algernon (Darth Anyan) says:

    One of the best books so far in the series The superhero excesses from the Indian campaigns have been tempered and Richard Sharpe is caught in aconvincing posture as a freshman officer recently promoted from the ranks and struggling to impose his authority on a band of recalcitrant soldiers His encounter with Harper is memorable and I look forward to further interaction between the two personalities As usual, there is a romance element in the novel, and this too has been treated in a mo One of the best books so far in the series The superhero excesses from the Indian campaigns have been tempered and Richard Sharpe is caught in aconvincing posture as a freshman officer recently promoted from the ranks and struggling to impose his authority on a band of recalcitrant soldiers His encounter with Harper is memorable and I look forward to further interaction between the two personalities As usual, there is a romance element in the novel, and this too has been treated in aconvincing manner than previous conquests of our gallant swashbuckler.The historical background of this Spanish adventure is probably the less accurate so far, with much of the action around Santiago de Compostella coming from Cornwell imagination, but the plot is well paced and reserves some surprises


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Sharpe's Rifles☂ [PDF / Epub] ☁ Sharpe's Rifles By Bernard Cornwell ✐ – Thomashillier.co.uk It s and the powerful French juggernaut is sweeping across Spain Lieutenant Sharpe is newly in command of the demoralized, distrustful men of the th Rifles He must lead them to safety and the only me It sand the powerful French juggernaut is sweeping across Spain Lieutenant Sharpe is newly in command of the demoralized, distrustful men of the th Rifles He must lead them to safety and the only means of escape is a treacherous trek through the enemy infested mountains of Spain.


About the Author: Bernard Cornwell

Cornwell was born in London in His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother, who was English, a member of the Women s Auxiliary Air Force He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine After he left them, he changed his name to his birth mother s maiden name, CornwellCornwell was sent away to Monkton Combe School, attended the University of London, and after graduating, worked as a teacher He attempted to enlist in the British armed services at least three times but was rejected on the grounds of myopiaHe then joined BBC s Nationwide and was promoted to become head of current affairs at BBC Northern Ireland He then joined Thames Television as editor of Thames News He relocated to the United States in after marrying an American Unable to get a green card, he started writing novels, as this did not require a work permitAs a child, Cornwell loved the novels of CS Forester, chronicling the adventures of fictional British naval officer Horatio Hornblower during the Napoleonic Wars, and was surprised to find there were no such novels following Lord Wellington s campaign on land Motivated by the need to support himself in the US through writing, Cornwell decided to write such a series He named his chief protagonist Richard Sharpe, a rifleman involved in most major battles of the Peninsular WarCornwell wanted to start the series with the Siege of Badajoz but decided instead to start with a couple of warm up novels These were Sharpe s Eagle and Sharpe s Gold, both published in Sharpe s Eagle was picked up by a publisher, and Cornwell got a three book deal He went on to tell the story of Badajoz in his third Sharpe novel, Sharpe s Company, published in Cornwell and wife Judy co wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym Susannah Kells These were A Crowning Mercy, published in , Fallen Angels in , and Coat of Arms aka The Aristocrats in Cornwell s strict Protestant upbringing informed the background of A Crowning Mercy, which took place during the English Civil War In , he also published Redcoat, an American Revolutionary War novel set in Philadelphia during its occupation by the BritishAfter publishing eight books in his ongoing Sharpe series, Cornwell was approached by a production company interested in adapting them for television The producers asked him to write a prequel to give them a starting point to the series They also requested that the story feature a large role for Spanish characters to secure co funding from Spain The result was Sharpe s Rifles, published in , and a series of Sharpe television films staring Sean BeanA series of contemporary thrillers with sailing as a background and common themes followed Wildtrack published in , Sea Lord aka Killer s Wake in , Crackdown in , Stormchild in , and Scoundrel, a political thriller, in In June , Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen s th Birthday Honours ListCornwell s latest work, Azincourt, was released in the UK in October The protagonist is an archer who participates in the Battle of Agincourt, another devastating defeat suffered by the French in the Hundred Years War However, Cornwell has stated that it will not be about Thomas of Hookton from The Grail Quest or any of his relatives.