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Destination Void ❮KINDLE❯ ❧ Destination Void ❄ Author Frank Herbert – Thomashillier.co.uk The starship Earthling, filled with thousands of hybernating colonists en route to a new world at Tau Ceti, is stranded beyond the solar system when the ship s three Organic Mental Cores, disembodied The starship Earthling, filled with thousands of hybernating colonists en route to a new world at Tau Ceti, is stranded beyond the solar system when the ship s three Organic Mental Cores, disembodied human brains that control the vessel s functions, go insane An emergency skeleton crew sees only one chance for survival to create an artificial consciousness in the Earthling s primary computer, which could guide them to their destination or could destroy the human race Frank Herbert s classic novel that begins the epic Pandora Sequence written with Bill Ransom , which also includes The Jesus Incident, The Lazarus Effect, and The Ascension Factor.

  • Paperback
  • 276 pages
  • Destination Void
  • Frank Herbert
  • English
  • 15 May 2019
  • 042507465X

About the Author: Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction authorHe is best known for the novel Dune and its five sequels The Dune saga, set in the distant future and taking place over millennia, dealt with themes such as human survival and evolution, ecology, and the intersection of religion, politics, and power, and is widely considered to be among the classics in the field of science fictionHe was the father of fellow author Brian Herbert.



10 thoughts on “Destination Void

  1. Lyn Lyn says:

    Relentless From the opening lines of desperate but intentional destruction and throughout the tight narrative, Frank Herbert has crafted in his 1966 novel Destination Void a seamless thread of tension and psychological intrigue I cannot understand why this has never been made into a film, the design is readily adaptable to a script and the friction between the archetypal cast is evocative of Sartre s No Exit Existentialism is a central, though understated element of the novel One character Relentless From the opening lines of desperate but intentional destruction and throughout the tight narrative, Frank Herbert has crafted in his 1966 novel Destination Void a seamless thread of tension and psychological intrigue I cannot understand why this has never been made into a film, the design is readily adaptable to a script and the friction between the archetypal cast is evocative of Sartre s No Exit Existentialism is a central, though understated element of the novel One character asks, We have manipulated mathematical infinity why can t we manipulate God The forced perspectuve narrative describes a microcosm of humanity that is at once itself manipulated and suspended without free will and at the same time questioning the very nature of consciousness and how a human is defined This is also suggestive of Aldous Huxley with his dystopian ideas about bottle babies and Herbert takes it a step further by focusingon the inter personal conflicts within and among the adults rather than examining macroeconomic and socio political ramifications of a dehumanizing event Destination Void may also have inspired the producers of The Matrix films Herbert has created a highly focused character study of humanity at the edge of itself, a staged drama in a single act with the human ego in the spotlight

  2. Kelly H. (Maybedog) Kelly H. (Maybedog) says:

    It s strange that the sequel to this novel is my favorite book of all time and yet I only gave this one two stars Part of the problem is that most of this book is really just a philosophical dialog about the nature of consciousness and an attempt to mathematically define it There s a some unnecessary intrigue where every character knows some secret about the other characters that they themselves don t know The point of view is changed many times on a page which Herbert admits he did for clar It s strange that the sequel to this novel is my favorite book of all time and yet I only gave this one two stars Part of the problem is that most of this book is really just a philosophical dialog about the nature of consciousness and an attempt to mathematically define it There s a some unnecessary intrigue where every character knows some secret about the other characters that they themselves don t know The point of view is changed many times on a page which Herbert admits he did for clarity of all things which makes things evenconfusing But mostly the book just made me feel stupid Metaphysics in college was simplistic compared to parts of this book There were many places I had to re read several times to get what he was trying to say At points I just didn t bother.The redeeming factor is the final chapter where the whole point is made and which sets up the next book in the series, The Jesus Incident which is an examination of the nature and definition of God among other things But where that book provides a full story to surround the discussion and lots of showing with action and character development, Destination Void just fumbles Which is too bad as the idea of what is consciousness is such a fascinating topic.This book is only for die hard Herbert fans and those who like convoluted discussions about the nature of consciousness

  3. Scott Rhee Scott Rhee says:

    Frank Herbert s Destination Void is thought provoking science fiction at its best The book readslike a play written in prose form, as it takes place solely on board the bridge of a spaceship and it is almost 95% dialogue But, oh wow, what dialogue The premise a small crew of six is manning a spaceship carrying a cargo of thousands of humans in suspended animation in the hopes of reaching an Earth like planet in the Tau Ceti galaxy to colonize The book opens en media res, after the Frank Herbert s Destination Void is thought provoking science fiction at its best The book readslike a play written in prose form, as it takes place solely on board the bridge of a spaceship and it is almost 95% dialogue But, oh wow, what dialogue The premise a small crew of six is manning a spaceship carrying a cargo of thousands of humans in suspended animation in the hopes of reaching an Earth like planet in the Tau Ceti galaxy to colonize The book opens en media res, after the ship s computers a giant neural network controlled by three human brains malfunction, a virtual impossibility Three of the six crew members are already dead The remaining three awaken Dr Prudence Weygand, a surgeon ecologist Each of the four have been assigned a new mission create a new ship s computer that would have a human like consciousness The problem each of the four are hiding secret agendas of their own, which seem to be at odds with the new mission of creating the artificial intelligence as well as the original mission of reaching Tau Ceti For a book written almost entirely in dialogue, this is a fast paced, suspenseful read Herbert uses the book s plot as a forum for some very ethical discussions on creating artificial intelligence and on the nature of human consciousness itself Very trippy, philosophical stuff

  4. Marius Marius says:

    A bunch of tech cwap end to end While you can glimpse Herbert s talent for high quality dialog, it s all about exchanging tech theories between four clones, 3 dudes and 1 dudette, oh, and handling cables.

  5. J.M. Hushour J.M. Hushour says:

    This is one of those Whafuck books that can best be approached by way of an awkward pop culture analogy Ready Imagine Reservoir Dogs but instead of bank robbers they re clones and instead of hiding out from the police, the guys are trying to build God inside a spaceship careening towards disaster That is, a one room setting populated by actions in which nothing is ever what it seems and the dialogue has one both at a loss and grinning and shaking one s head in bemusement.That s pretty mu This is one of those Whafuck books that can best be approached by way of an awkward pop culture analogy Ready Imagine Reservoir Dogs but instead of bank robbers they re clones and instead of hiding out from the police, the guys are trying to build God inside a spaceship careening towards disaster That is, a one room setting populated by actions in which nothing is ever what it seems and the dialogue has one both at a loss and grinning and shaking one s head in bemusement.That s pretty much it A bunch of clones on the seventh attempt at a mission to colonize another world the six previous ones ended in the ship s destruction find out they re being tested to survive and need to get further than their previous versions did or thousands of colonists in hibernation die problem is, the giant mutated brains on their spaceship all went insane and died, so they have to create a consciousness I think that will be able to take over the ship s functions and yay, everyone lives.Most of the novel is thick, clotty technical dialogue that you drown in very quickly, but you don t care, because they re building God, the female pilot is experimenting with hallucinogenic drugs and trying to suppress her horniness, the religious character wants to kill everybody and the main guy ignores everyone and dares the cops to show up Or maybe he s a cop Mr Pink

  6. Bart Bart says:

    So if I have to believe others and I do there is a certain technical merit in these kind of passages The fact that Herbert himself even updated his work to the standards of the new day, indicates he was serious to a certain extent So it s not just all random non nonsensical gobbledygook, not at all.The paradox is that it reads as gobbledygook nonetheless, and while the book may have had some technical merit, ultimately it fails spectacularly, as no one has ever tried to use this boo So if I have to believe others and I do there is a certain technical merit in these kind of passages The fact that Herbert himself even updated his work to the standards of the new day, indicates he was serious to a certain extent So it s not just all random non nonsensical gobbledygook, not at all.The paradox is that it reads as gobbledygook nonetheless, and while the book may have had some technical merit, ultimately it fails spectacularly, as no one has ever tried to use this book as a manual to try and design conscious AI, because in the end, Herbert too relies on handwavium technical posturing notwithstanding That Herbert didn t take a stab at true brain science can t be held against him while the first human EEG was already recorded in 1924, the muchprecise MEG signals were first measured in 1968, and rudimentary CAT, PET and MRI scanning techniques only originated in the early 70ies.All this does not mean the book is a total failure Full analysis on Weighing A Pig

  7. Emily Emily says:

    There is a very cool story here somewhere It s hiding in all the overly complicated dialogue about computers and consciousness To quote a friend I somehow convinced to read this book with me this book is all science and no fiction

  8. Erik Erik says:

    Is a man just a machine s way of making another machine Destination Void is the first of four books set in the eponymous universe of Herbert s making, also sometimes known as the Pandora series The action in this book centers around an umbilicus crew of four and their ship, Earthling, that is carrying a massive cargo of hibernating colonists meant to colonize a planet in the distant Tau Ceti system Before the ship even leaves our solar system, however, the ship s three Organic Mental Core Is a man just a machine s way of making another machine Destination Void is the first of four books set in the eponymous universe of Herbert s making, also sometimes known as the Pandora series The action in this book centers around an umbilicus crew of four and their ship, Earthling, that is carrying a massive cargo of hibernating colonists meant to colonize a planet in the distant Tau Ceti system Before the ship even leaves our solar system, however, the ship s three Organic Mental Cores mutant human derived brains bred to interface with the ship and promote its homeostasis go completely mad and die are killed This leaves the crew scrambling to develop an artificial consciousness to control the ship before they are destroyed, either by external forces or by one of their own This book is a difficult but rewarding read that actually doesn t center around the plot Yes, this book does have a sensible plot and does set up somewhat the events of the next book, but these are secondary to the philosophical and technical discussions contained within In their venture to create an artificial consciousness, the characters discuss in great length what actually defines consciousness and also technical details in creating it using electronic circuitry and mathematical constructs The discussions on consciousness gave me a rough idea of what the crew was after and did produce a few ah ha moments The technical consciousness building concepts seemed a littledubious, but that might be because I didn t scrutinize that aspect very closely on my first read through That being said, it seems to me that this book will shineon subsequent readings, which I plan on doing now that I know what to expect and have a big picture idea of what is going on With greater comprehension I am sure my rating will increase by a star or possibly two

  9. Ben Hartley Ben Hartley says:

    Herbert should have stuck to space opera This book certainly hasn t aged well It s filled with technical terms that just don t seem to fit the context Maybe my perspective is too modern, but as a computer scientist I found it painful to read these technical descriptions I ve read technical descriptions of 1940s computers and I find them fascinating but this book is not It s like Herbert didn t understand the terms or he was trying to sound futuristic by making up new terms The Dune boo Herbert should have stuck to space opera This book certainly hasn t aged well It s filled with technical terms that just don t seem to fit the context Maybe my perspective is too modern, but as a computer scientist I found it painful to read these technical descriptions I ve read technical descriptions of 1940s computers and I find them fascinating but this book is not It s like Herbert didn t understand the terms or he was trying to sound futuristic by making up new terms The Dune books were great, but I winced at least once reading them when I read a passage describing the cryogenic treatment of a weapon that was cooled to 100 degrees Kelvin Anyone with a high school understanding of physics should know that 0 Kelvin is the coldest temperature possible

  10. Steve Steve says:

    This is not a novel It is a meditation on computers, AI, and Consciousness, as seen in 1978 Without all the speculation, it would have made a decent novella But speculation is what it was all about with much discussion of early computers and whether or not they can be aware It comes from the time, when computers were still considered dangerous see HAL 9000 and many other rogue computer stories , which is not a negative in itself I don t fault it for being written before Apple and Microsof This is not a novel It is a meditation on computers, AI, and Consciousness, as seen in 1978 Without all the speculation, it would have made a decent novella But speculation is what it was all about with much discussion of early computers and whether or not they can be aware It comes from the time, when computers were still considered dangerous see HAL 9000 and many other rogue computer stories , which is not a negative in itself I don t fault it for being written before Apple and Microsoft It s the only novel I ve tried to read in decades by skimming whole pages If I wasn t interested in the sequelsI would have stopped after 50 pages, but I kept hoping forConsidering that I like Herbert s other books, this was a real disappointment

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