!!> PDF ✫ Lustrum ✓ Author Robert Harris – Thomashillier.co.uk

Lustrum The Second Book In The Stunning Roman Empire Trilogy By Robert Harris, Author Of The Acclaimed Bestsellers Fatherland, Enigma, Archangel, Pompeii, Imperium And The Ghost.It Is 63 BC, The Year When Cicero Is Consul Most Of His Time In Office Is Devoted To Uncovering And Thwarting A Violent Conspiracy To Overthrow The State, Ostensibly Led By Crassus And A Group Of Disaffected Senators Underlying It All Is The Great Rivalry Between Cicero And Caesar Who Represent Two Different Types Of Ambition One Orthodox, The Other Revolutionary As Caesar S Power Grows, Cicero Must Face The Inevitable Compromises That Come With Power Is It Justifiable To Use Illegal Methods In Order To Save The Republic Robert Harris Yet Again Proves Himself A Master Of Historical Fiction As He Takes The Reader To The Heart Of Republican Rome With A Novel That Is At Once Brilliantly Researched And Utterly Gripping From The Hardcover Edition.


10 thoughts on “Lustrum

  1. says:

    This book is the second volume of the Cicero trilogy The first is Imperium and the third has not been published yet The title of Lustrum used for the UK market refers to the five years in Cicero s life from the moment Cicero became Consul 63 58BC In the US it has been published as Conspirata The choice of titles for either side of the Atlantic invites speculation Lustrum presents a different Cicero from the one we saw in the first volume In Imperium we could witness the orator s climb through the political ladder, thanks to his forceful speeches on the Verrus Trial, his first attack on Catilina, and on his election to Consul It was the story of a rising star.In Lustrum the rising of Cicero is at an end and we also discover a couple of his failings For although the book begins with his great battle and achievement during his Consulship year 63BC , or his dismantling of the Catilina conspiracy had it succeeded, the subsequent history of the western world would have developed differently , posterity continues to question the execution of the conspirators without trial Harris does a good job in presenting the case as rather complex, and not a simple and pure result of ruthless tyranny, and somewhat saves the hero like portrayal of Cicero Nonetheless, the facts are there Sadly and irritably, we also see him prone to the same weaknesses that we detect in our modern democracies politicians Cicero did let the illusio...


  2. says:

    I have read and thoroughly enjoyed other books by Robert Harris but not this one what I found here were far too many characters, little foundation for understanding the complicated norms and practices of Rome, and no cohesion...


  3. says:

    This is a story of a gifted orator who is legally elected to lead his country during a time of great crisis, but faces incredible opposition from powerful people who use a variety of dirty tricks and propaganda techniques to enrage mobs of stupid people to subvert the law and government so they can seize power for themselves Oh, and it s set in ancient Rome I wonder why it seems so familiar today Robert Harris second novel about Cicero uses Roman intrigue and power plays as the back drop for a really interesting and fast paced book that reads like a political thriller The story is told from the viewpoint of Tiro, Cicero s slave and personal secretary Tiro actually invented a form of shorthand that gave us symbols like and etc , and he wrote a biography of Cicero that was used by a lot of scholars, but was eventually lost during the fall of the Roman Empire Harris makes ancient Rome very relatable and makes you understand the culture and politics while not getting bog...


  4. says:

    Uma Hidra IntemporalAdoro latim e Roma Antiga, e por isso Lustrum me soa t o bem E soa me bem por dentro e por fora, na capa, conte do e personagens Irrompemos pelo velho mundo, penetramos na pol tica de C cero e doutros que a fizeram com ele, e revemo nos Olhamos o passado com condescend ncia, como um mero estudo preliminar ao nosso dispor mas, e se f ssemos apenas uma impress o duradoura dos nossos antepassados Ler Lustrum aprender Hist ria...


  5. says:

    Once upon a time, novelists could be simultaneously serious and popular Hemingway comes to mind, but even so Steinbeck, who had less literary pretension and sustained and pointed topical engagement Graham Greene aimed at once for contemporary relevance and durability, and often than not hit the bull s eye with later novels such as The Quiet American, The Comedians, and The Human Factor Lesser, or at least less remembered, writers such as Morris West and Nevil Shute took seriously both the craft of storytelling and the novelist s responsibility to have something of public significance to say.The British writer Robert Harris is a throwback to this tradition a novelist who embraces a public role for his books than for himself as a celebrity or personality and who aspires both to entertain and to edify None other than Nelson Mandela has called him a writer who handles suspense like a literary Alfred Hitchcock He works with aplomb in several genres, from the fascinating counterfactual Nazi thriller Fatherland, to a fun and gripping imagining of Roman life and bureaucracy in Pompeii, to a brilliant, queasily political contemporary murder mystery...


  6. says:

    This certainly has the correct title Conspirata Yes, in every sense This is the second book of a trilogy upon Cicero s life and legend Here he is risen to a commanding peak of influence, has his first year as Consul and saves the Republic several times And he does just that, it s not an exaggeration Because there are personalities rising and conspiring to make the Republic stray far from the Senate and Citizen voting as prescribed by the Roman Constitution Catalina first and then a trio of others, not the least of which is our bird of prey nosed, broad shouldered and supremely arrogant Julius Caesar Pompey is there in the trio mix All the other characters both female and male are sublimely framed and each of their habits, abodes, compatriots, lovers, and haters set into their parts Or should I BETTER say, their roles Because they all play roles, and some of those during this particular changing Roman era play various roles quite expertly to differing people Tiro is still waiting for his freedom and serving with superb notice of detail And using his speed notation skills At times for entire sessions and trials, beyond just the scope of Cicero s speeches or defense litigation This is far harder to conceptualize than the first book when Cicero was training his body and mind to play his role for Rome, for government, for family, for expression of excel...


  7. says:

    4 Stars Fantastic book I hadn t planned to read this book sequel to Imperium A Novel of Ancient Rome so soon, but it just worked out that way I found my copy a new copy I might add of this book at a book sale in my hometown for 1 and couldn t resist Robert Harris didn t disappoint and dare I say, exceeded my expectations for the second book in this series.We pick up just about where Imperium left off Tiro, Cicero s secretarial slave, once again narrates the life of his master and, when the book begins, Consul We follow Cicero s life from consulship in 63 BCE to the start of his exile in 58 BCE A lot happens in the five year span and that means that the reader is never bored We see of Caesar, Pompey, and Clodius, among Cicero s friends and enemies This book hi...


  8. says:

    4.5 starsNo idea why this book is also available under the title Conspirata I have it as paperback and audio book as Lustrum and was a little confused when it came up under the previously mentioned title when I looked it up here on GR Anyway, Conspirata or Lustrum, this is the second book in the Cicero trilogy and my favourite, although it covers only approximately 4 years of Cicero s political and personal life Again, I listened to the audio version but, unlike with the first one Imperium, I ll leave the audio performance out.At the end of the day, the book is an excellent account of Cicero s year as Consul that showcases his brilliance as orator as well as politician, and in which he has to exercise all his cunning and wit for his political and personal survival Directly connected to his fate is also Rome s status as a republic that is under constant attack by no less than Ceasar, Pompey and Crassus, to name only the big players It shouldn t come as surprise how a m lange of complacency on the people s part, the corr...


  9. says:

    A fictional account of Cicero s consulship and the years until his forced departure from Rome, written by his longtime slave and secretary, Tiro, Harris has again written a stupendous account of insider politics in the Senate Tiro s narrative voice is generous but unsparing, exposing Cicero s greatness and pettiness It is hard not to draw parallels with co...


  10. says:

    This is by far Robert Harris best novel about ancient Rome so far Like it s predecessors it is scrupulously accurate, but unlike them, it is also genuinely exciting, with vivid scenes and living, believable characters This one shows the great orator Cicero at the highest and then the lowest points of his career first the defeat of Catiline s conspiracy with Cicero given the great honor of being named pater patriae then just a few years later his being driven into exile by his political enemies Complicated politics, double and triple crosses, manipulations, huge egos, all wrapped up in some of the most pivotal events in the history of the Western world For the first time I have a clear picture of what Caesar might really have been like, and I can begin to understand how his brand of megalomania differed from that of ...


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