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10 thoughts on “مكيافيللي -فيلسوف السلطة

  1. says:

    I feel sorry for Nicol Machiavelli for he was a bit of a fool During his life he made repeated political blunders betting several times on the wrong people Highly sophisticated his political thinking certainly was, but it did not match well enough his choices in life They attest a poor political intuition Out of the wide array of writings he has left us, the historical and political treatises have enjoyed the highest acclaim In particular The Prince became the bible for the politician for I feel sorry for Nicol Machiavelli for he was a bit of a fool During his life he made repeated political blunders betting several times on the wrong people Highly sophisticated his political thinking certainly was, but it did not match well enough his choices in life They attest a poor political intuition Out of the wide array of writings he has left us, the historical and political treatises have enjoyed the highest acclaim In particular The Prince became the bible for the politician for generations from Cromwell to Hitler and caused the word Machiavellian to be coined when referring to unscrupulous cunning And yet, reading about his life one can easily see that he was not Machiavellian enough for he let his own personal admirations blind his political vision So it was, for example, with his admiration for Cesare Borgia, the second illegitimate son, and the right hand, of Pope Alexander VI Machiavelli thought of him as the model for leaders, an individual who identified his goals fast and who would not waver when pursuing them But what Machiavelli had not understood is that personal excellence and abilities are not sufficient In corrupt systems, a political godfather is vital The qualities admired by Machiavelli in Cesare were good for nothing when his father suddenly died and was succeeded by Alexander s enemy in Rome Giuliano della Rovere, or Julius II the Warrior Pope Machiavelli was baffled How could someone who had done everything right fall, while someone who was the opposite, succeed He made a similar wrong call with Lorenzo di Piero di Medici, a grandson of Lorenzo the Magnificent Not only had Machiavelli opposed the powerful Florentine family when its representatives had something to show for themselves, but when they came back to power, Machiavelli chose to fix on his hopes for advancement, as well as the hopes of all Italy on this self indulgent imbecile who had never enjoyed a moment s quiet, philosophical reflection in his life It was to this Lorenzo that Machiavelli dedicated his The Prince.Lorenzo di Piero di MediciAs a witness of the period during which the Florentine political arena, caught in the middle of the ambitions of Rome, the Milan Duchy, the Naples Kingdom, and the French and Aragonese Kings, period which unfolded as a fast game of SnakesLadders, Machiavelli gave a lot of thinking to the nature of Fortune What it was, how it functioned and how to deal with it He had observed that throughout history varying situations could produce the same results while similar approaches could lead to divergent consequences His conclusion was that people differed greatly and that one could not change one s nature men are unable to master their own natures Machiavelli, in the Nature versus Nurture dilemma, respondedas a psychologist than a sociologist.During the Renaissance these doubts approached one to adangerous arena, that of Free Will This together with other aspects brought about the inclusion of The Prince in theIndex Librorum prohibitory only 25 years after its publication.As one of his most famous precepts was that the end justifies the means one of Machiavelli s pet projects was the creation of a militia for Florence Traditionally, the small city states in Italy had recourse to the condottieri or hired mercenaries As Florence functionedlike a corporation of traders and financiers than as truly political unit, the occasional employment or subcontracting of these professional soldiers seemed the most convenient solution The mercenaries proved often too mercenary, however And Florence was, during Machiavelli s time and with the expulsion of the Medici, trying to set its own political machinery as a fully fledged professional government A Florentine militia made a lot of sense.What made less sense was how Machiavelli set himself to organize it Even if he had penned The Art of War, he was neither a soldier nor a military engineer His inspiration came from his extensive reading of Latin treatises As he kept the Roman modes of fighting as his models he found the contemporary use of artillery inadvisable His way of training the soldiers could not have been that soldiery when the capitano of the Black Nights, the admired Giovanni delle Bande Nere, challenged Machiavelli to drill his 3000 men in the manner described in his Art of War, led to complete chaos Giovanni delle Bande Nere also a Medici No wonder then that when the Florentine militia faced the French army, the Italians were annihilated If Italy had given birth to the cultural Renaissance and humanism, the modern military machinery of the Renaissance was fashioned by the French They had a formidable force fully trained, fully experienced, fully armed, fully equipped, and of a professional brutality unmatched by the pageant like battles to which the Italian states were accustomed Canons faced a corps with limited artillery So it was not until a similar military power to the French showed a parallel interest in Italy, that the French halted in their advance Machiavelli did not foresee this.This book has been an excellent introductory read in my interest to understandof Niccol Machiavelli It is mostly dedicated to his life and the harsh and complex political scenario of his times Discussion of Niccol s works is also very well interspersed in the narrative I have liked Kings language better than in Brunelleschi s Dome How a Renaissance Genius Reinvented Architecture, but one still feels that he is not in full command of the period For example, I have missed a discussion of the figure of King Ferdinand of Aragon, who seems to have been one of the models for The Prince He also mentions that there was a rumour that the Duke of Bourbon, in the sack of Rome, had been killed by a musketball fired by Benvenuto Cellini Rather than a rumour it was Cellini himself who claimed this in his The Autobiography Of Benvenuto Cellini which I have read recently.Knowing a bitof the context in which Machiavelli wrote his books, I plan now to explorehis writings and theories.But the main conclusion which I have drawn from King s account, is that Niccol Machiavelli had a lucid practical mind but that he lacked the practical knowledge to put it into practice.MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM16 9 2014I am afraid I will have to write a PD to this review based on what I am reading now


  2. says:

    Before reading this biography, I knew the Machiavellian personas of The Prince and Renaissance drama, and I was also aware that the real Machiavelli was a multi talented statesman who wasn t nearly as villainous as his later reputationbut that was about it I had no idea that he wrote bawdy poetry and plays, that he created and trained a ultimately unsuccessful citizen militia, that he was imprisoned and tortured, that he wrote the Prince after his forced retirement, or that he had a wife a Before reading this biography, I knew the Machiavellian personas of The Prince and Renaissance drama, and I was also aware that the real Machiavelli was a multi talented statesman who wasn t nearly as villainous as his later reputationbut that was about it I had no idea that he wrote bawdy poetry and plays, that he created and trained a ultimately unsuccessful citizen militia, that he was imprisoned and tortured, that he wrote the Prince after his forced retirement, or that he had a wife and several children but don t worry, he seems to have forgotten them too, greatly preferring travel and the company of prostitutes I also learnedabout Leonardo da Vinci s warfare engineering, some very nasty popes, and the deliciously, disgustingly ruthless Cesare Borgia after reading Mirror, Mirror last year I promised myself that I would read a biography on the Borgias and I still haven t shame on me I ll admit that I zoned out during a few sections on treaties and military maneuvers, but it was a very interesting and informative book overall and I m quite glad that I read it


  3. says:

    It was easy to find oneself on the wrong side of the ruler du jour in 16th century Italy, which was controlled by corrupt families and defended by contract soldiers whose loyalties were readily purchased Machiavelli ventured into this world with his diplomatic acumen, then, when he fell out of favor, turned his ambitious mind to brutal political writings, satirical plays and the occasional courtesan A theoretician of conspiracy and duplicity, he was also a brilliant observer of his times Sym It was easy to find oneself on the wrong side of the ruler du jour in 16th century Italy, which was controlled by corrupt families and defended by contract soldiers whose loyalties were readily purchased Machiavelli ventured into this world with his diplomatic acumen, then, when he fell out of favor, turned his ambitious mind to brutal political writings, satirical plays and the occasional courtesan A theoretician of conspiracy and duplicity, he was also a brilliant observer of his times Sympathizing with Machiavelli, King provides a convincing portrait of one of the most misunderstood thinkers of all time Machiavelli s writings shed a dark light on the man, but less so when set against the tapestry of Florence s Palazzo della Signoria King s book is everything a short biography should be and , due to King s sharp wit and zesty anecdotes As the document was being signed, a dove came through the window and flew over the heads of the Ten The dove then crashed into a wall and fell dead at the feet of the Ten, but its appearance was still considered a good omen It provides a strong sense of the history of both the man and his times and a nice introduction to Machiavelli s writings Moreover, like one of Machiavelli s bawdy plays, it is a riveting and exhilarating read, full of salacious details and brisk prose June Publishers Weekly Starred Review Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc


  4. says:

    What else can I say about Ross King s books that I haven t said already This book, like his others, was an interesting and exciting read I continue to be amazed at the author s detailed research, his ability to discern fact from fiction, and present the facts in a comprehensive manner that tells the whole story of the subject, their work, and the world around them.


  5. says:

    A Fascinating book about a very misunderstood man The Prince didn t even come out until about 200 years after his death, in fact when he was alive, few people even knew about it He was better know for being a lower tier politician and a play write than anything else Very intersting


  6. says:

    Title Machiavelli Philosopher of Power Eminent Lives Author Ross King Price Rs 462.39 Format Kindle EditionFile Size 547 KBPrint Length 258 pagesPublisher HarperCollins e books Reprint edition 13 October 2009 Sold byAsia Pacific Holdings Private LimitedLanguage EnglishThere isn t an uncomplicated way to initiate reviewing a book of this kind Here stands an author, who tenders unwrapped support to politicians to take and proffer bribes, defraud, swindle, intimidate, and e Title Machiavelli Philosopher of Power Eminent Lives Author Ross King Price Rs 462.39 Format Kindle EditionFile Size 547 KBPrint Length 258 pagesPublisher HarperCollins e books Reprint edition 13 October 2009 Sold byAsia Pacific Holdings Private LimitedLanguage EnglishThere isn t an uncomplicated way to initiate reviewing a book of this kind Here stands an author, who tenders unwrapped support to politicians to take and proffer bribes, defraud, swindle, intimidate, and even slay if obligatory Then again, one would do well to remember that The Prince didn t see the light of day until about two centuries after the death of Machiavelli While the foremost part of when he was alive, very few people even knew about it Machiavelli, to the best part of the masses was a stunted, scheming politician and a second rate playwright,than anything else Again, in all fairness it can be said that Machiavelli left a remarkable authority on the modern age Princes like Frederick the Great were in effect Machiavellian, although they fervidly disavowed Machiavelli Art historian Ross King provides a venerable prologue to the life and struggles of Machiavelli More than anything, this journalistic foreword proves to the reader that in no scheme of political philosophy the sway of milieu is further apparent than in that of Machiavelli Niccol was by no means ceremonial Arising out of a modest middle class environment, he served as a diplomat for the Republic of Florence, enjoying restricted eminence as the author of coarse plays Noverthelss, he was to the core of his heart a true Florentine, a man concerned with practical politics and the art of statecraft In both of his celebrated works, thus, he deals with a the rules for the acquisition, expansion and maintenance of power, b with the causes of rise and fall of States and, c the means by which statesmen can keep themselves in power The subject matter of both of his books Prince and Discourses is thus, fundamentally the same the promotion of ascientific statecraft the art of acquiring power and the craft of retaining it.King begins his discussion with the young Machiavelli, who at the tender age of 29, in 1498, was put up as the leader of the Second Chancery This granted him charge of the city s foreign affairs The modern epoch in political thought was ushered in by two forces at work in Europe in the 15th century Renaissance and Reformation In the medieval age, people mused on matters of spirit, deliverance and God Renaissance made man the theme of study instead of God However, despite the fact that renaissance had made appearance in Italy, Machiavelli s epoch was also called an epoch of bastards and adventurers It was a society academically brilliant and artistically ingenious, while at the same time, a casualty to the nastiest political dishonesty and relapse where not only was brutality, sly and assassination the standard method of Government, but might and dexterity were the means to triumph King shows, how Machiavelli stood his ground until Florence was beguiled by the Medicis, who had been ousted in 1494 Machiavelli personally supervised the conscription and exercise of mercenaries in order to combat the Medicis His army, if truth be told, was routed With the patronage and support of the papal militia of Rome, the Medicis proved insuperable Reclaiming Florence in 1512, they dismissed Machiavelli and may have also subjected him to physical torture The reader would do well to remember that George Holland Sabine in his classic work A History of Political Theory avows that Machiavelli, in an odd sense is the political theorist of the masterless man At the head of the 16th century the monarchist retort had swept the democratic tendencies of the concilior movement In the Church, the Pope had become absolute, while on the secular side, unlimited monarchy was overriding feudal aristocracy It was known as the period of the strong man Despite this, during this century, Italy was divided into five States Naples, Milan, Venice, Florence and the Papal State Some of these like Venice and Florence were republics and despots ruled others Internal anarchy was rampant Machiavelli chose to intriguingly side with the Medicis King shows the dynamics of the progression through which Machiavelli sucked up to the Medicis His The Prince was dedicated to a Medici King states that one of the greatest contributions of Machiavelli lies in the fact that he amalgamated political theory with political practice, following the empirical method of observation and experience The part that the State has played in modern politics is an index of the clearness with which Machiavelli grasped the drift of political evolution His political philosophy was realistic, mirroring the conditions of the moment He was ready to sacrifice the peace and solidarity of humanity at the altar of an efficient national state and as such was one of those who are chiefly responsible for the growth of modern nationalism Personally, his life was one of potholed alliances and broken commitments His gargantuan infidelity was a source of abundant pain to his wife Machiavelli held the Church to be principally responsible for the putrid state of affairs He is said to have remarked We, Italians, owe to the Church of Rome and to her priests our having become irreligious and bad The Church has kept and still keeps our country divided In such times of current and cross currents Machiavelli s contribution was the most remarkable which gave the Italian nation not only the doctrines of sustenance and predominance but lasted for along time in future political analysis All the same, King shows that Machiavelli was not free from inconsistencies in his thought If in accordance with Machiavelli, man is intrinsically selfish, unsocial and inept of doing good, how can he agree to lower his private interests to public interests Moreover, the need for security an ample cause for the State coming into existence would barely give an explanation for its continued subsistence and ever escalating activities In fine, King s non academic style of narration, underscores the verity that Machiavelli was a true Florentine nationalist with artistic designs for the republic s foreign policy in the voracious pitch of Renaissance Italy It is an exceedingly comprehensible portrait A 4 on 5 I ld say


  7. says:

    Interesting new perspective on Machiavelli as a fun loving guy, who simply observed and wrote about the tactics of the powerful political personages of the day Some amusing anecdotes about the long running attempts of the Florentines to subjugate the Pisans via some hilariously creative, yet ultimately doomed methods.


  8. says:

    Solid, well written and concise, virtues similar to those of King s books about Michelangelo and Brunelleschi However, those two dudes were hugelytalented and interesting than Machiavelli, so the book about the latter ends up being on the dull side.


  9. says:

    This an enjoyable and easy read considering the complicated history of renaissance Italy I would high recommend it to anyone interested in this period or the genesis of the end justifies the means mantra.


  10. says:

    Another interesting insight in the the era of da Vinci, Michelangelo and Machiavelli and renaissance Florence Machiavelli was not at all what I expected considering his reputation for writing The Prince