WWW: Watch Epub ↠ Hardcover


  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • WWW: Watch
  • Robert J. Sawyer
  • English
  • 08 May 2017
  • 0441018181

10 thoughts on “WWW: Watch

  1. Stephanie *Extremely Stable Genius* Stephanie *Extremely Stable Genius* says:

    Catlin tap tap tap Catlin Decter Yes Is this Catlin Decter Yes Hi Catlin, this is Stephanie I just read the second book in the WWW Series and I had to see if I could make contact with you trough your implant under your left eye that enables you to see the real world and the web I hoped I could work my way in and, what do you know, I did it May I ask you a few questions Yes I liked the concept of this book, the series is unique and, overall, I enjoyed the book but there was one Catlin tap tap tap Catlin Decter Yes Is this Catlin Decter Yes Hi Catlin, this is Stephanie I just read the second book in the WWW Series and I had to see if I could make contact with you trough your implant under your left eye that enables you to see the real world and the web I hoped I could work my way in and, what do you know, I did it May I ask you a few questions Yes I liked the concept of this book, the series is unique and, overall, I enjoyed the book but there was one thing that bugged the hell out of me, and that was the ridiculous overuse of the word yes Seriously, at some point I doubted was even reading a science fiction book and thought I d stumbled onto some weird erotica with all the yes, yes, YESes going on I couldn t really follow the story after a while because every time I heard the word yes I felt a rage boiling inside me Yes I know the author is Canadian and the book was set in Toronto Is the use of the word yes as question common in place of what Pardon me Excuse me Yes, at least I think so Oh that s right, you are supposed to be an American, from Austin Texas Is that right Yes But if you are a Texan wouldn t you use Ma am Sir I beg your pardon and stuff like that Well, yes..yes that would make sense Stop it Catlin Stop what Stephanie Stop with all the god damn yeses I have a self destruct code that I can send to your implant at anytime Try saying yes onetime Go on Uh..no I don t think so 4 stars for the story, one point knocked off for the yeses that drove me insane


  2. Bradley Bradley says:

    Having only read the first two of this trilogy that is, obviously, a single story, I m forced to write a review that readslike an update rather than an all out This is Great.That being saidThis is great Why If I went by a certain set of standards that was commonplace ten or fifteen years ago, I would have been reading this novel and saying hey This is on par or better than almost ALL the SF out there It has all the huge scope, the excellent science, the pure speculation of what a Having only read the first two of this trilogy that is, obviously, a single story, I m forced to write a review that readslike an update rather than an all out This is Great.That being saidThis is great Why If I went by a certain set of standards that was commonplace ten or fifteen years ago, I would have been reading this novel and saying hey This is on par or better than almost ALL the SF out there It has all the huge scope, the excellent science, the pure speculation of what a modern day singularity might become with our current technology It has emergent an emergent AI, with full explanations, in the World Wide Web It has heart, social and Game Theory, great storytelling, and a hugely updated nod and a literal nod to Wargames And above all, it s GOOD Effortless storytelling, easygoing pace, enjoyable characters, and an almost corny plug for Canadians.So what happened Robert J Sawyer has written something easily as good if not better than his prior Hugo noms and wins in the early 2000s I actually ENJOY this onlevels than his other trilogy.Hell, I started crying once or twice And the whole damn thing is OPTIMISTIC and HOPEFUL.Awards aside, this is very good SF I think it should be a staple of all you fanboy and fangirl s diets And this is especially true if you have noticed an ongoing trend in SF in general that seems to be having a conversation with itself As in every generation builds on what the prior generations have created The same is true for SF as in everything But in this case, Sawyer is self consciously bridging several huge gaps between all the classics and the modern sensibilities.I can do nothing but applaud


  3. Ms.pegasus Ms.pegasus says:

    The eponymous title is not an imperative addressed at the reader, but an acronym of an NSA division the Web Activity Threat Containment Headquarters Vigilant watchfulness of all web activity is the reality in this book, written in 2010 three years before Edward Snowden s disclosures , portrays This is the second book in Sawyer s trilogy Although Sawyer gives a recap of the events that took place in the first book, a sense of attachment to the characters would be lost by not reading these bo The eponymous title is not an imperative addressed at the reader, but an acronym of an NSA division the Web Activity Threat Containment Headquarters Vigilant watchfulness of all web activity is the reality in this book, written in 2010 three years before Edward Snowden s disclosures , portrays This is the second book in Sawyer s trilogy Although Sawyer gives a recap of the events that took place in the first book, a sense of attachment to the characters would be lost by not reading these books in order This is particularly important because the balance has shifted here to plot advancement over science The result is a book that felt muchlike a young adult genre book It s a problem enhanced by Sawyer s failure not for lack of trying to develop the character of Caitlin s father Malcolm Decter, a brilliant theoretical physicist with Asperger s syndrome Book One ended with fifteen year old Caitlin receiving an implant that corrects the faulty decoding in the optic centers of her brain Blind since birth, she is now connecting emotional sensations to abstractions like color and beauty Thanks to the implant, Caitlin is able to view and communicate with an emergent entity which she calls Webmind She has shared knowledge of its existence with her parents, the two Dr Decters, and with Dr Kuroda in Japan After recovering from their shock, they agree to keep Webmind a secret in order to protect it Dr Kuroda creates programming for Webmind to decode visual as well as textual information This advance allows Sawyer to draw on film allusions from War Games, and Star Trek The Motion Picture Director s Cut Part of the charm of the story is the depiction of Webmind s uneven learning curve Driven by an almost insatiable curiosity, it works on password cracking methods in its spare milliseconds, interrogates Caitlin s mother about her first marriage, and solves a serious multitasking dilemma As Webmind s information base expands, he yes, Caitlin has decided to assign it a gender becomesarticulate The disjointed outcries of Book One become questions and observations couched at first in archaic syntax and later, jokey colloquialisms Of course, like every fictional AI before him, Webmind wrestles with the directive of Do Good Sawyer draws material from evolutionary algorithms, non zero sum gaming theory, and evolutionary biology However, I found the material less integrated into the narrative than in the first book Possibly this was because I have no familiarity with the literature in these areas, particularly on the question of the evolutionary value of consciousness, which it never even occurred to me to ask Instead, I allowed myself to be caught up in the plot WATCH of course discovers the existence of Webmind, and is bent on destroying him a threat to national security, they claim Agents from Canadian Intelligence are dispatched to coerce the Decters into disclosing how that might be accomplished The scene in which they interrogate Caitlin is one of the most appealing sections of the book They spin a seemingly benign cover story They only want to help Webmind Listening, Webmind messages CaitlinHe s lyingIt s a satisfying moment The agents have all along been underestimating Caitlin, thinking of her as a gullible kid It also represents the small victory of individuals pitted against powerful government agencies A second plot strand carried forward in this book is that of Hobo, the bonobo chimp hybrid who has been taught sign language Hobo has started to exhibit aggressive chimp like behaviors just at the time his stay at the California institute where he has been raised is being challenged by the zoo where he was born One of the disappointments I had with this book was the failure to expand on the bird flu crisis in China and the fate of Sinanthropus It s another loose end that Sawyer uses to entice us into reading the third book of the trilogy


  4. Cathy Cathy says:

    I liked it better than the first book in most respects It didn t have that magical feeling of discovery, both for Caitlin learning to see and for Webmind becoming, but it also didn t have as many annoying tics and rants Caitlin didn t feel quite as much a real kid in this, she s just too much of a genius, too well read and understanding, and her new friend Matt was worse because we didn t know him well enough for it to make sense But Caitlin did feel real and immediate as a person it s ironi I liked it better than the first book in most respects It didn t have that magical feeling of discovery, both for Caitlin learning to see and for Webmind becoming, but it also didn t have as many annoying tics and rants Caitlin didn t feel quite as much a real kid in this, she s just too much of a genius, too well read and understanding, and her new friend Matt was worse because we didn t know him well enough for it to make sense But Caitlin did feel real and immediate as a person it s ironic that my favorite character by this middle aged man is a teenaged girl, but that s imagination for you, he did a good job.As for the US government response to Webmind, although extreme, the reasoning was presented with fairness Also, it s nice as a citizen to imagine that their fast response time in noticing the situation is accurate I was surprised to see the Canadian authorities shown as being so heavyhanded.I was also surprised and a bit disappointed to see the na vet portrayed by Caitlin s family and their friend the Japanese doctor when it came to predicting and preparing for the world s reaction to Webmind They never thought to try to encrypt their communications Or thought about what night happen to them or Caitlin if it all came out, or to prepare Webmind to protect himself They re portrayed as geniuses, they read extensively, and watch movies, yet the idea that they didn t even think to try to protect themselves or Webmind It just seemed really unlikely Sawyer loves to use his books as a platform for his political positions, which I can t blame him for, but it often comes at the expense of the story when these little rants interrupt the flow of the work He held it down to one major topic this time and at least made it a topic extremely relevant to one of the characters Even when I agree with him, as I did about this topic, I just wish he d leave it out or work it in better A gay scientist having a argument about the right to marry with a colleague didn t support the plot of her work with Hobo, the chimpanzee bonobo who speaks ALS and paints representational art It was sort of tied in at the end, but that tie in could have been done in a way that was muchappropriate and convincing once I saw the overall argument of the book about consciousness and game theory.What else There were still lots of pop culture references, but most felt relevant and appropriate instead of overwhelming and pandering It was actually funny when he mentioned the Fast Forward TV show.So what did I really like about it, other than how real Caitlin felt I like the science and philosophy discussions even if 16 year olds having a lot of them seemed a bit silly I like the idea that Big Brother was written a very long time ago and in a very different world, but has somehow becoming an operating assumption and that things have changed so much that we need new ideas about possibilities and probabilities And I liked the idea that maybe happiness is the inevitable outcome for our world instead if apocalypse, if some of the ideas about consciousness and game theory as presented are correct Overall the idea of Webmind still seems much to simplistic, but it s a good thought process to follow and think about, and an enjoyable story


  5. Michael Michael says:

    Robert Sawyer s second installment in his WWW trilogy picks up right where Wake left off but, thankfully, does not fall prey to middle book syndrome.If you ve not read the first installment, there will be SPOILERS ahead for it Can t really talk about book two without giving away the end of book one Wake ended with Caitlin Decker contacting the growing intelligence emerging on the World Wide Web The second novel explores their growing friendship and the responsibility Caitlin feels to hel Robert Sawyer s second installment in his WWW trilogy picks up right where Wake left off but, thankfully, does not fall prey to middle book syndrome.If you ve not read the first installment, there will be SPOILERS ahead for it Can t really talk about book two without giving away the end of book one Wake ended with Caitlin Decker contacting the growing intelligence emerging on the World Wide Web The second novel explores their growing friendship and the responsibility Caitlin feels to help nurture this new entity into maturity Caitlin debates whether or not to tell her parents about Webmind and then later helps the intelligence discover a sense of right and wrong At one point, Webmind watches a live video cast of a suicide, which leads to the discussion This section of the novel is one of thecompelling and chilling sections of the novel.Meanwhile, the United States government has noticed the emergence of Webmind and is taking steps to assure it doesn t become too powerful Sawyer also weaves in the story of the apes from the first installment and we finally get to see how this separate thread is slowly colliding with the story of Webmind As with the first installment, Sawyer continues to open up fascinating, thought provoking areas of science fiction and their philosophical ramifications But he never loses track of his characters, keeping them interesting and growing over the course of the story And the novel is one that passes by far too quickly, leaving me eager for the final installment next year


  6. Deborah Ideiosepius Deborah Ideiosepius says:

    Quite an enjoyable book The concept is lightly sci fi, without too much of the fi Slightly cyberpunk without the punk and pleasant to read but with enough content to keep you at it for a while The core of the story is about the relationship between two individuals Caitlin, who was born blind but has been fitted with a newly installed retinal implant which allows her to see the world, she can also see the data of the net Though the book calls it the world wide web The other individual is Quite an enjoyable book The concept is lightly sci fi, without too much of the fi Slightly cyberpunk without the punk and pleasant to read but with enough content to keep you at it for a while The core of the story is about the relationship between two individuals Caitlin, who was born blind but has been fitted with a newly installed retinal implant which allows her to see the world, she can also see the data of the net Though the book calls it the world wide web The other individual is an artificial intelligence that has spontaneously arisen in the net, they call it emergent it is called webmind.This book is mainly about those two characters and they are both quite enjoyable Since it is character based the book can be a little slow at times Since Caitlin is super intelligent, and webmind knows everything that is online there are a lot of diverse references to many different topics, which can be interesting.There is a mild risk or confrontational element to the plot as governments, predictably, are afraid of webmind and want to destroy him The reader never has any cause for doubt or concern however There is no actual climax to the main story arc and a lot of possible areas of exploration simply fade away The actual climax or conclusion of the story is about evolution and intelligence as the sixteen year old but very, very intelligent Caitlin lectures us, her parents and her boyfriend about what it really is That sounds sarcastic and cynical it is Having a main character know it all is a risky writing tactic in my opinion The hypotheses and opinions posited on intelligence and evolution however are interesting, especially I imagine if you know a bit about maths and game writing theories.I would recommend it to sci fi lovers, especially younger people say under 30 s who may not have encountered the concept too many times before It is better suited to people who read a lot and very eclectically, or they will spend a lot of their time online googing things I read a lot, very eclectically and I had no idea about a lot of the references woven into the story.This was a library book that I plucked off the shelf and it was a good pick but it has lost one full star with me for being a sequel and giving no warning of this anywhere on the cover or in the description.This is a prime hate of mine in general Watch does not to too badly at overcoming this it was about page 100 before I was sure that this was a sequel I had a hunch by chapter three but it was not obnoxiously obvious You can read the whole book without having read the sequel but it becomes annoying over time I gather the first book described how webmind came to be, Caitlin went on an unpleasant date with Trevor and several other things that are alluded to repeatedly without much explanation A fair proportion of the characters must have been described, introduced and developed in the first book because they can be quite two dimensional There is a sub plot about a small group of primate researchers and an ape called Hobo This sub plot is interesting certainly, but it is also somewhat mystifying as nothing and no one is really introduced or described The reason for it being there is also obscure, it does provide welcome relief from Caitlin, who otherwise dominates almost every page, and I think it is meant to be a major proof about intelligence and evolution The detached plot, which no links to the main plot and insufficient explanation of anything, just seems odd, though potentially very interesting.I am suspecting that there will be another book about Caitlin and Webmind, but although the four or five main characters are not bad, I will not rush to read it


  7. Sean Randall Sean Randall says:

    When I read Wake 10 months ago, my initial impressions were of a lot of disparate threads The AI, the blindness, the chimp, the Chinese, just to name the first few that occur to me now I gave it a 4 star rating, because I enjoyed it I wonder now if my own defences, particularly on the blindness thing, caused me to not allow it the breathing space it deserved.This instalment is certainly a 5 star offering There are no fewer threads and subplots, everything s still going on and the American go When I read Wake 10 months ago, my initial impressions were of a lot of disparate threads The AI, the blindness, the chimp, the Chinese, just to name the first few that occur to me now I gave it a 4 star rating, because I enjoyed it I wonder now if my own defences, particularly on the blindness thing, caused me to not allow it the breathing space it deserved.This instalment is certainly a 5 star offering There are no fewer threads and subplots, everything s still going on and the American government are weighing in on the stage as well But I think my main reason for catapulting this book to my highest rated standard is its education value Webmind, the AI of the story is growing, and Caitlin, though clever, is not omnipotent This opens up a great deal of room for exposition, and because of the computer oriented content, I can certainly see that, as a teen, I would have learned a great deal about all sorts of things from this book It s only because you have a limited perspective that you understand that the person facing you must be seeing something completely different from what you re seeing as you face him, just as one example, a very neat summary of the theory of mind There are nuggets scattered throughout like any evolutionist should have intuitively known that tonsils had value The sheer quantity of topics discussed through evolution to zero sum situations is breathtaking in scope.Then there are the things, not facts, but things that Sawyer clearly either believes or at least could some day The fact that we can choose our path, that consciousness puts the breaks on instinct, for example, is one such another is the exposition on surveillance, of particular significance here because Webmind can practically see everything.Sawyer s bringing up material he s handled before, but somehow, in this setting and written like this, it all seems to gel so mucheffectively the Neanderthal Parallax series of books Hominids, Humans and Hybrids argue that having ones every move monitored is a good thing, in an alien context but written here, the way it is, really made me stop and think about it on aHuman level Carry that thought to religion Calculating God , evolution frameshift , racial diversity Starplex or indeed almost any other tenet of Humanity you can think of, he seems to have something to say on it.So to sum a brilliant continuation of the story, better than the first, I d say but also fascinating for the information and opinions you learn too


  8. Brandon Brandon says:

    Part II of the WWW trilogy continues the story of Caitlin and the emergence of a consciousness within the internet I enjoyed this book and kept wanting to readbut return return And this seems to betrue with every book Sawyer releases There were times when this felt like a Canadian culture textbook, or a math textbook, or a physics textbook His Canadiana becomes nauseating and false in a lot of senses believe it or not, but Canadians have heard of, AND READ, non canadian au Part II of the WWW trilogy continues the story of Caitlin and the emergence of a consciousness within the internet I enjoyed this book and kept wanting to readbut return return And this seems to betrue with every book Sawyer releases There were times when this felt like a Canadian culture textbook, or a math textbook, or a physics textbook His Canadiana becomes nauseating and false in a lot of senses believe it or not, but Canadians have heard of, AND READ, non canadian authors and while the science is fun to read, it pulls you out of the story quite a bit to do so return return I m starting to see a mould in Sawyer s writing return return 1 Come up with a really cool story idea and write a short story his short stories are great btw return 2 In order to expand this into a novel, insert the following Debates aboute God and religion, explanations of scientific topics, false stereotypes about Canada and canadians, clever puns return return At one point, he drops a reference to his show Flashforward based on the book by the same name Seriously I ve read his short story anthologies, and I really think that s where he shines Although he writesnovels now I understand the need to do so Short stories don t sell , I feel like he s never become a novel writer He s still a short story writer a heart and he uses these literary contraptions to extend the book into a novel length book return return It s unfortunate because I really DID enjoy reading this and I m looking forward to reading the third book next year, but aside from the core story, these things really stand out for me and overshadow the great story telling ability Sawyer has


  9. Porter Porter says:

    I like the story this book tells Unfortunately, there were several things in the book that kept me from actually enjoying the book, so I cannot give itthan 2 stars As much as I wanted the story, I found finishing the book tedious.In my review of WWW Wake, the first book in this series, I compared it favorably to another book with a smart young protagonist, Little Brother I said that in comparison, Doctorow looks like he s trying too hard to be hip.I must now say the same thing about Saw I like the story this book tells Unfortunately, there were several things in the book that kept me from actually enjoying the book, so I cannot give itthan 2 stars As much as I wanted the story, I found finishing the book tedious.In my review of WWW Wake, the first book in this series, I compared it favorably to another book with a smart young protagonist, Little Brother I said that in comparison, Doctorow looks like he s trying too hard to be hip.I must now say the same thing about Sawyer His constant current pop culture references are amusing at first, but quickly become distracting.As the book progresses, the author s soapbox moments get longer andtiresome About a quarter of the way through, I thought Yeah, we get it, Author You think belief in God is silly, and that California s Proposition 8 is a travesty I don t care, but at least you ve gotten it out of your system, so we can continue on with the story Unfortunately, I was giving the author too much credit.I was also disappointed that the secondary story involving the primatologists came to nothing In the first book, the two storylines didn t connect at all In this book, the main storyline the one I cared about affects the secondary one, but the secondary one doesn t affect the main story line in any meaningful way That entire sub plot could have been removed It felt like the time spent reading those portions had been wasted


  10. Tamahome Tamahome says:

    My status updates say it all Maybe a little heavy handed and corny, but I still like it learning lots about Canada maybe now we ll see what happens to the monkey


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WWW: Watch❮Epub❯ ❥ WWW: Watch Author Robert J. Sawyer – Thomashillier.co.uk Award winning author Robert J Sawyer continues his wildly thought provoking science fiction saga of a sentient World Wide Web Webmind is an emerging consciousness that has befriended Caitlin Decter an Award winning author Robert J Sawyer continues his wildly thought provoking science fiction saga of a sentient World Wide Web Webmind is an emerging consciousness that has befriended Caitlin Decter and grown eager to learn about her world But Webmind has also come to the attention of WATCH, the secret government agency that monitors the Internet for any threat to the United States and they re fully aware of Caitlin s involvement in its awakening WATCH is convinced that Webmind represents a risk to national security and wants it purged from cyberspace But Caitlin believes in Webmind s capacity for compassion and she will do anything and everything necessary to protect her friend.


About the Author: Robert J. Sawyer

Robert J Sawyer is one of Canada s best known and most successful science fiction writers He is the only Canadian and one of only writers in the world to have won all three of the top international awards for science fiction the Nebula Award for The Terminal Experiment, the Hugo Award for Hominids, and the John W Campbell Memorial Award for MindscanRobert Sawyer grew up in Toronto, the son of two university professors He credits two of his favourite shows from the late s and early s, Search and Star Trek, with teaching him some of the fundamentals of the science fiction craft Sawyer was obsessed with outer space from a young age, and he vividly remembers watching the televised Apollo missions He claims to have watched the classic film A Space Odyssey times He began writing science fiction in a high school club, which he co founded, NASFA Northview Academy Association of Science Fiction Addicts Sawyer graduated in from the Radio and Television Arts Program at Ryerson University, where he later worked as an instructorSawyer s first published book, Golden Fleece , is an adaptation of short stories that had previously appeared in the science fiction magazine Amazing Stories This book won the Aurora Award for the best Canadian science fiction novel in English In the early s Sawyer went on to publish his inventive Quintaglio Ascension trilogy, about a world of intelligent dinosaurs His award winning The Terminal Experiment confirmed his place as a major international science fiction writerA prolific writer, Sawyer has publishedthan novels, plus two trilogies Reviewers praise Sawyer for his concise prose, which has been compared to that of the science fiction master Isaac Asimov Like many science fiction writers, Sawyer welcomes the opportunities his chosen genre provides for exploring ideas The first book of his Neanderthal Parallax trilogy, Hominids , is set in a near future society, in which a quantum computing experiment brings a Neanderthal scientist from a parallel Earth to ours His Mindscan explores the possibility of transferring human consciousness into a mechanical body, and the ensuing ethical, legal, and societal ramificationsA passionate advocate for science fiction, Sawyer teaches creative writing and appears frequently in the media to discuss his genre He prefers the label philosophical fiction, and in no way sees himself as a predictor of the future His mission statement for his writing is To combine the intimately human with the grandly cosmic.