➷ Siete noches Free ➭ Author Jorge Luis Borges – Thomashillier.co.uk

Siete noches El Prestigio De Jorge Luis Borges Y El Inter S Despertado Por Su Obra Motiv Que Fuera Invitado A Menudo A Exponer Verbalmente Ante Distintos Auditorios Sus Ideas, Conocimientos E Intuiciones Siete Noches Recoge Las Conferencias Que Pronunci En El A O En El Teatro Coliseo De Buenos Aires Y Que Fueron Revisadas Por El Propio Autor De Forma Previa A Su Publicaci N Impresa En Ellas Recorre Varios De Sus Temas Favoritos Y Que Encontraron Recurrentemente Eco En Su Obra Literaria Y Ensay Stica La Divina Comedia , La Pesadilla , Las Mil Y Una Noches , El Budismo , La Poes A , La C Bala Y La Ceguera


10 thoughts on “Siete noches

  1. says:

    What is magic Magic is a unique causality It is the belief that besides the causal relations we know, there is another causal relation That relationship may be due to accidents, to a ring, to a lamp We rub a ring, a lamp, and a genie appears That genie is a slave who is also omnipotent and who will fulfill our wishes It can happen at any moment A good poem does not allow itself to be read in a low voice or silently If we can read it silently, it is not a valid poem a poem demands pWhat is magic Magic is a unique causality It is the belief that besides the causal relations we know, there is another causal relation That relationship may be due to accidents, to a ring, to a lamp We rub a ring, a lamp, and a genie appears That genie is a slave who is also omnipotent and who will fulfill our wishes It can happen at any moment A good poem does not allow itself to be read in a low voice or silently If we can read it silently, it is not a valid poem a poem demands pronunciation Poetry always remembers that it was an oral art before it was a written art It remembers that it was first songI think what is most likeable about Borges the author is that you get to see Borges the reader the guy whose paradise was a library And here we get to meet that reader his favorite books view spoiler Divine Comedy and One Thousand and One Nights hide spoiler , his poetic faith view spoilerColeridge said that poetic faith is the willing suspension of disbelief If we attend the theater, we know that, amid the scenery, there are costumed people speaking the words of Shakespeare or Ibsen or Pirandello which have been put in their mouths But we accept that these people are not costumed, that the man in the antechamber slowly talking to himself of vengeance really is Hamlet, Prince of Denmark We lose ourselves Films are even stranger, for what we are seeing are not disguised people but photographs of disguised people, and yet we believe them while the film is being shownhide spoiler , his knowledge of traditions all over the world, his habit of quoting and drawing connections between texts as well as Borges the person with all his troubled life his fears masks and mirrors , his nightmares and his blindness Anyway, to go on when you can quote Borges is like, as Punjabi expression goes, showing lamp to the sun The Divine ComedyPersonally, I am a hedonistic reader I have never read a book merely because it was ancient I read books for the aesthetic emotions they offer me, and I ignore the commentaries and criticism The translation could be, at best, a means and a stimulus for the reader to approach the original Poetry is, among so many other things, an intonation, an accentuation that is often untranslatableNightmaresGroussac writes that it is astonishing that each morning we wake up sane that is, relatively sane after having passed through that zone of shades, those labyrinths of dreams It also happens in dreams that are not nightmares they ask us something, and we don t know how to answer they give us the answer, and we are astonished The answer may be absurd, but in the dream it is exactly right Everything has been prepared I have come to the conclusion, though it may not be scientific, that dreams are the most ancient aesthetic activityOne Thousand and One NightsThe Persians have now incorporated him into their history Alexander, who slept with a sword and the Iliad under his pillow Why 1001 talesIn this, there is another kind of beauty I think it lies in the fact that for us the word thousand is almost synonymous with infinite To say a thousand nights is to say infinite nights, countless nights, endless nights To say a thousand and one nights is to add one to infinity Let us recall a curious English expression instead of forever, they sometimes say forever and a day A day has been added to forever It is reminiscent of a line of Heine, written to a woman I will love you eternally and even afterWhat enchanted Aesop or the Hindu fabulists was to imagine animals that were like little men, with their comedies and tragedies The idea of the moral proposition was added later The most famous tale of The Thousand and One Nights is not found in the original version It is the story of Aladdin and the magic lamp It appears in Galland s version, and Burton searched in vain for an Arabic or Persian text Some have suspected that Galland forged the tale I think the word forged is unjust and malign Galland had as much right to invent a story as did those confabulatores nocturni Why shouldn t we suppose that after having translated so many tales, he wanted to invent one himself, and didBudhismWhy not believe in the story of Prince Siddhartha He replied Because it doesn t matter what matters is to believe in the Teachings He added, I think withwit than truth, that to believe in the historical existence of the Buddha, or to be interested in it, is something like confusing the laws of mathematics with the biographies of Pythagoras or Newton One of the subjects of meditation for the monks in the monasteries of China and Japan is to doubt the existence of the Buddha It is one of the doubts that must be imposed on one s self in order to arrive at the truth Man need not abandon the carnal life because it is lowly, ignoble, shameful, sorrowful asceticism too is ignoble and sorrowful He preaches a middle way to use the theological terminology He has reached Nirvana, and he continues to live for another forty odd years, dedicated to teachingPoetryThe fact is that poetry is not the books in the library, not the books in Emerson s magic chamber Poetry is the encounter of the reader with the book, the discovery of the book Bradley said that one of the effects of poetry is that it gives us the impression not of discovering something new but of remembering something we have forgotten in the East, in general, they do not read literature and philosophy historically They study the history of philosophy as though Aristotle were disputing with Bergson, Plato with Hume, all at the same time This greatly disturbed Deussen and Max M ller, who could not determine the chronology of the authors they were studyingThe KabbalahHorace said, At times, good Homer nodded No one would say that, at times, the good Holy Spirit noddedBlindnessNo one should read self pity or reproach into this statement of the majesty of God who with such splendid irony granted me books and blindness at one touch Democritus of Abdera tore his eyes out in a garden so that the spectacle of reality would not distract him I wanted to lie down in darkness The world of the blind is not the night that people imagine


  2. says:

    Emerson said that a library is a magic chamber in which there are many enchanted spirits They wake when we call them When the book lies unopened, it is literally, geometrically, a volume, a thing among things When we open it, when the book surrenders itself to its reader, the aesthetic event occurs And even for the same reader the same book changes, for the change we are the river of Heraclitus, who said that the man of yesterday is not the man of today, who will not be the man of tomorrow Emerson said that a library is a magic chamber in which there are many enchanted spirits They wake when we call them When the book lies unopened, it is literally, geometrically, a volume, a thing among things When we open it, when the book surrenders itself to its reader, the aesthetic event occurs And even for the same reader the same book changes, for the change we are the river of Heraclitus, who said that the man of yesterday is not the man of today, who will not be the man of tomorrow We change incessantly, and each reading of a book, each rereading, each memory of that rereading, reinvents the text.This is a series of seven lectures Borges delivered in the late 70s, relying on his capacious memory as his eyesight had departed by this time The final lecture on Blindness explores this dynamic, citing Oscar Wilde s assertion that Homer had to be mythologized as a blind poet to present poetry as an aural art There are sidelong digressions on The Arabian Nights, on Dante Etymology is explored It is a telling endorsement of Borges that I was transfixed by his pontificating on Buddhism, a subject I can t imagine contemplating otherwise The Maestro recognizes human failing without wasting time to illustrate such His remark that being blind afforded him the opportunity to explore medieval literature, especially Old English and the Scandinavian Ruins This revelation is most profound


  3. says:

    This was good It s seven lectures that Borges gave in seven nights in Buenos Aires in 1977 that s a lot of sevens But it feltlike it was me an Borges sitting in a small room across from each other He started talking to me about


  4. says:

    Borges is our Virgil only he knows the way from the introduction by Alastair Reid At first you might mistake the frequency and variety of Borges references for pretentiousness, but soon you will understand it as a symptomof genius Borges seems to be an expert in all things even marginally literary, and it shows very clearly in this clever, erudite, and surprisingly easy to read collection of essays Since they were adapted from a series of lectures he gave, they really do read conversa Borges is our Virgil only he knows the way from the introduction by Alastair Reid At first you might mistake the frequency and variety of Borges references for pretentiousness, but soon you will understand it as a symptomof genius Borges seems to be an expert in all things even marginally literary, and it shows very clearly in this clever, erudite, and surprisingly easy to read collection of essays Since they were adapted from a series of lectures he gave, they really do read conversationally, making the sometimes densely layered and storied topics he discusses actually comprehensible.The world is simply a better place to live while reading Borges, there I said it


  5. says:

    A transcription of Borges lectures originally delivered in Buenos Aires Lit crit without the academic pom poms Playful takes on seven subjects Dante s Commedia, dreams and nightmares, the endless pleasures of The Thousand and One Nights, Buddhism, poetry, the Kabbalah, and blindness I imagine myself attending these lectures in English and turning the ideas over in my mind before going to sleep Perhaps I will sleep peacefully knowing that the next night s lecture will be another food for t A transcription of Borges lectures originally delivered in Buenos Aires Lit crit without the academic pom poms Playful takes on seven subjects Dante s Commedia, dreams and nightmares, the endless pleasures of The Thousand and One Nights, Buddhism, poetry, the Kabbalah, and blindness I imagine myself attending these lectures in English and turning the ideas over in my mind before going to sleep Perhaps I will sleep peacefully knowing that the next night s lecture will be another food for the mind Or I can t sleep at all, anticipating the next lecture Or I will be visited by fearful nightmares of mirrors, of closed rooms, of the inferno There s no question that literature for Borges is like religion Reading for him is an act of miracle He is a blind man who sees


  6. says:

    Finished this on my birthday Read one chapter a day for a week not the author s recommended method, but the obvious one Like taking a night class His voice, ideas echoed in my head and had an effect on some of my browsing choices for the next few weeks Actually, it s the translator s voice, isn t it The lecture transcriptionist s voice Borgesian, that.


  7. says:

    Seven Nights gathers seven lectures delivered by Borges in Buenos Aires at the Teatro Coliseo, between June and August 1977 As usual, the erudition is overwhelming, the subjects enthralling, the interpretation original and the passion catching Most of all, they offer, as usual, keys for reading not only the classics but also Borges s works, revealing his obsessions, his views and his literary games The first conference is dedicated to his book of all books, The Divine Comedy, which can be rea Seven Nights gathers seven lectures delivered by Borges in Buenos Aires at the Teatro Coliseo, between June and August 1977 As usual, the erudition is overwhelming, the subjects enthralling, the interpretation original and the passion catching Most of all, they offer, as usual, keys for reading not only the classics but also Borges s works, revealing his obsessions, his views and his literary games The first conference is dedicated to his book of all books, The Divine Comedy, which can be read in infinite ways, in which the expression defines the content and vice versa, whose most insignificant characters havelife that any main character in other books, and which, above all, is the ultimate proof that mankind was made for art Therefore, The Commedia is a book that everyone ought to read Not to do so is to deprive oneself of the greatest gift that literature can give us it is to submit to a strange asceticism.After a dissertation about nightmares, suspected to be cries from hell, Borges speaks of the Thousand and One Nights, the book the Arabs say that it cannot be finished Probably because it is infinite, like literature I remember the little volumes aligned in my mother s library that I read one by one I always thought I d read them all I was obviously wrong The lecture about Buddhism offers two explanations for its longevity tolerance resulted from that discipline of the self taught by yoga and the request of faith you have to feel the four truths and the eightfold path and recalls the dream like quality of life Poetry develops Croce s theory that literature is expression, to emphasize that language is an aesthetic creation, since it is always a matter of choice, dictated by feelings This is why, Borges jokes, There are people who barely feel poetry, and they are generally dedicated to teaching it. Kabbalah developed an interesting although not original theory about the existence of evil We were created by the last emanation of God, the almost zero God The evil is nothingthat this divine imperfection translated into the material world This explanation given by the cabbalists surpasses others, among which the theologians , who declared that evil is negative, an absence of good, forgetting that physical pain, misfortune etc are felt positive When we are miserable, we feel it as misery Leibniz s, who compared two libraries one containing only the Aeneid, the other thousand books and Aeneid, to emphasize that the second is superior because evil is necessary for the variety of the world But he seems to forget that it is one thing that there are bad books in the library, and another thing to be those books And if we are those books we are condemned to hell Kierkegaard s, who said that if there were one soul in hell necessary for the variety of the world, and if that soul were his, he would sing from the depths of hell the praises of the Almighty The last lecture, reminding Oscar Wilde s presumption that Antiquity had deliberately represented Homer as blind argues that blindness can be a powerful tool to better understand literature We may believe that Homer never existed, but that the Greeks imagined him as blind in order to insist on the fact that poetry is, above all, music that poetry is, above all, the lyre that the visual can or cannot exist in a poet.In fact, Borges own ability to listen to the music of the spheres, sight or no sight, is proof enough


  8. says:

    A writer, or any man, must believe that whatever happens to him is an instrument everything has been given for an end This is even stronger in the case of the artist Everything that happens, including humiliations, embarrassments, misfortunes, all has been given like clay, like material for one s art One must accept it.


  9. says:

    An absolute joy to read.Borges has a rare gift when it comes to literature He manages to make you fall in love with the act of reading Few people can talk about classics in literature with true passion and little pretension Borges does both.I strongly recommend this to anyone who needs a reminder that there is still plenty of joy to be had in holding a paper book.While all 7 texts are memorable, his lecture view on The Divine Comedy will surely make you want to pick up a copy.Seven Nights als An absolute joy to read.Borges has a rare gift when it comes to literature He manages to make you fall in love with the act of reading Few people can talk about classics in literature with true passion and little pretension Borges does both.I strongly recommend this to anyone who needs a reminder that there is still plenty of joy to be had in holding a paper book.While all 7 texts are memorable, his lecture view on The Divine Comedy will surely make you want to pick up a copy.Seven Nights also has a large selection of quotes worth writing down.Overall, the text could be compared to Michael Chabon s Maps and Legends Chabon shares a similar passion and enthusiasm for storytelling and story tellers, but doesn t always manage to keep the pretension out of it


  10. says:

    Reading this compact book of Jorge Luis Borges s seven lectures delivered in 1977 in Buenos Aires was something entertaining and informative due to his vast knowledge and in depth understanding on each lecture topic Nowadays his name might be less popular, few readers might not be keen on reading his works indeed, he has long been acclaimed as one of the great writers in Latin America Please visit this website to know him a littlethen we may bor Reading this compact book of Jorge Luis Borges s seven lectures delivered in 1977 in Buenos Aires was something entertaining and informative due to his vast knowledge and in depth understanding on each lecture topic Nowadays his name might be less popular, few readers might not be keen on reading his works indeed, he has long been acclaimed as one of the great writers in Latin America Please visit this website to know him a littlethen we may borrow some of his works, for instance, Collected Fictions Penguin 1999 , Selected Non fictions Penguin 2000 , Fictions Penguin 2000 , etc from any good public or university library to read or may visit some good bookstores where we can browse and buy his books as we like.It might be a good idea for us to read on how he started his unique, splendid and inspiring lectures, in other words, how he set the scene as extracted from the first paragraphs of the three I preferred If we find any a bit lengthy, we may read a few lines as something to taste regarding these literary hors d oeuvres.1.The Thousand and One Nights A MAJOR EVENT in the history of the West was the discovery of the East It would beprecise to speak of a continuing consciousness of the East, comparable to the presence of Persia in Greek history Within this general consciousness of the Orient something vast, immobile, magnificent, incomprehensible there were certain high points, and I would like to mention a few This seems to me the best approach to a subject I love so much, one I have loved since childhood, The Book of the Thousand and One Nights or, as it is called in the English version the one I first read The Arabian Nights, a title that is not without mystery, but is less beautiful p 42 2 Buddhism THE SUBJECT TONIGHT is Buddhism I will not go into the long history that begins some twenty five hundred years ago in Benares, when a prince of Nepal name Siddhartha or Gautama became the Buddha, set in motion the wheel of the Law, and proclaimed the four noble thuths and the eight fold path I will speak of the essence of the religion, the elements of Buddhism which have been preserved since the fifth century before Christ From the age of Heraclitus, Pythagoras, and Zeno, up to our own time, the elements have remained the same, but the religion has become encrusted with mythology, astronomy, extraneous beliefs, and magic Since the subject is complex, I will limit myself to what the diverse sects have in common This corresponds,or less, to Hinayana, or the Less Vehicle p 58 3 Blindness IN THE COURSE of the many lectures too many lectures I have given, I ve observed that people tend to prefer the personal to the general, the concrete to the abstract I will begin, then, by referring to my own modest blindness Modest, because it is total blindness in one eye, but only partial in the other I can still make out certain colors I can still see blue and green And yellow, in particular, has remained faithful to me I remember when I was young I used to linger in front of certian cages in the Palermo zoo the cages of the tigers and leopards I lingered before the tigers gold and black Yellow is still with me, even now I have written a poem entitled The Gold of the Tigers, in whcih I refer to this friendship p 107


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