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The Face of War ❮Download❯ ✤ The Face of War Author Martha Gellhorn – Thomashillier.co.uk This volume collects Gellhorn s global reportage from the Spanish Civil War to the current troubles in Central America Whether recording the smell of summer grass over Normandy beaches or the suspende This volume collects Gellhorn s global reportage from the Spanish Civil War to the current troubles in Central America Whether recording the smell of summer grass over Normandy beaches or the suspended daily life of the mother of a disappeared Salvadoran, her passionate allegiance to truth shines throughout the work.


About the Author: Martha Gellhorn

American novelist, travel writer and journalist, considered to be one of the greatest war correspondents of the th century The Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism is named after her.



10 thoughts on “The Face of War

  1. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    The Face of War by Martha Gellhorn 1908 1998 , author, journalist and famed war correspondent, collects in one volume reports the author had previously written for magazines The reports are about the wars she covered the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, the Nuremburg Trials, the 1946 Paris Peace Conference, the Indonesian National Revolution, the Six Day War the Third Arab Israeli War , the Vietnam War and finally the Nicaraguan and Salvadoran civil wars of the 1980s Gellhorn was a The Face of War by Martha Gellhorn 1908 1998 , author, journalist and famed war correspondent, collects in one volume reports the author had previously written for magazines The reports are about the wars she covered the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, the Nuremburg Trials, the 1946 Paris Peace Conference, the Indonesian National Revolution, the Six Day War the Third Arab Israeli War , the Vietnam War and finally the Nicaraguan and Salvadoran civil wars of the 1980s Gellhorn was a journalist over a span of sixty year The book was originally published in 1959, but successivelyhas been added Both the 1959 and 1986 introductions are included in the audiobook version herewith reviewed.The book is about war It puts a human face on war That is its intention not to draw battle strategies, not to speak of those in command, not to speak of those planning wars for attainment of political goals but of the soldiers fighting the wars and of the civilians slaughtered because they lie in war s path We are at Dachau We see what she saw when the concentration camp was liberated We fly with Gellhorn in a P61 Black Widow night flying bomber This book puts each reader right there in the war Not just one war, but several Only by experiencing what war is really like does one come to understand the true horror of war The author wants us to perceive war as it truly is, to feel it in our guts, so united, we will raise our voices against it Gellhorn gives us Nadezhda Mandelstam s words If you can do nothing else, you must scream You ask who Nadezhda Mandelstam is Nadezhda Mandelstam was the Russian author, educator and wife of poet Osip Mandelstam He died in 1938 in a transit camp near Vladivostok Gellhorn wants to bring to our attention that we each have a duty to perform We must see that the government we elect takes action against human injustice wherever such occurs She is telling us to make our voices be heard Gellhorn writes passionately She writes to make us care She writes to incite people to take action Even when writing of war, she employs humor, albeit of the dark, sarcastic, ironical kind Quotes jotted down from the book Perhaps it Is impossible to understand anything, unless it has happened to you I do not hope for a world at peace, all of it, all the time I do not believe in the perfectibility of man, which is what would be required for world peace I only believe in the human race I believe the human race must continue To see a whole nation passing the buck is not an enlightening spectacle Seeing the destruction in Cologne If you see enough of anything, you stop seeing it We did not look at each other You are ashamed You are ashamed for mankind Either Reagan knows he is lying, or he doesn t know he is lying Ominous either way On the night of New Year s Day, I thought of a wonderful New Year s resolution for the men who run the world get to know the people who only live in it Martha Gellhorn was an intelligent woman She reasoned logically She expressed herself well.Some lines are not completely clear I would ask myself WHO is saying this and WHERE exactly could this be happening, but confusion clears The confusion arises because the book is a string of separate reports Gellhorn was the third wife of Ernest Hemingway, married to him from 1940 to 1945 This book Is not autobiographical She says not a word about Ernest Hemingway, as one thinks she might when speaking of that which she saw and experienced in Madrid in 1937, and in Barcelona in 1938 They were in Spain together.Love and Ruin by Paula McLain is the book that made me interested in reading The Face of War The books complement each other.Bernadette Dune reads the audiobook very, very well Steady, even and clear The strength of the words speak for themselves.Those interested in The Face of War will surely also be interested in War s Unwomanly Face by Svetlana Alexievich I want everyone to read The Face of War It is that good You will not regret having read it, even if you have already read a zillion books on the Second World War, even if you are already a pacifist and detest war It should be required reading for all


  2. Russell Bittner Russell Bittner says:

    This curt bit of advice, from the Russian writer and wife of the poet, Osip Mandelstam Nadezdha Mandelstam, is one that Martha Gellhorn quotes at the conclusion of the chapter titled Rule by Terror in the section titled Wars in Central America p 321 It was sage advice under the then present circumstances in Ms Mandelstam s time it was sage advice in Ms Gellhorn s time It remains sage advice in our time.On pp 151 152, Ms Gellhorn writes On the night of New Year s Day, I thought o This curt bit of advice, from the Russian writer and wife of the poet, Osip Mandelstam Nadezdha Mandelstam, is one that Martha Gellhorn quotes at the conclusion of the chapter titled Rule by Terror in the section titled Wars in Central America p 321 It was sage advice under the then present circumstances in Ms Mandelstam s time it was sage advice in Ms Gellhorn s time It remains sage advice in our time.On pp 151 152, Ms Gellhorn writes On the night of New Year s Day, I thought of a wonderful New Year s resolution for the men who run the world get to know the people who only live in it This was something she wrote on the first day of January, 1945, which was over 68 years ago Things haven t changed much since then as Ms Gellhorn predicted they wouldn t in her coverage of conflicts from the Spanish Civil War up to and through the Reagan s interventions in both El Salvador and Nicaragua.Before I ran across Ms Mandelstam s suggestion, I originally thought of titling my review Read this book at your own risk or Read this book and weep Why Because I suspect you ll feel a similar shame while reading it Shame as an American, certainly But also shame as a human being The history of our species is not a pretty one AndThe Face of Warbegins only with the Spanish Civil War Martha Gellhorn is no knee jerk liberal She s a solid, unflinching liberal by conviction And her conviction is the result of first person observation, investigation and inquiry In other words, not of hearsay or conjecture.At the end of May, I read and reviewed Naomi Klein sThe Shock DoctrineIn my opinion, that book could sit side by side with this one on the same shelf of woe Both women are profoundly competent journalists Both are the kind of journalist we needof unflinching, compassionate and, above all for those who d heed their prophetic words , intelligent.I ll risk making the same recommendation I made withThe Shock DoctrineBuy this book and read it cover to cover As with Ms Klein s book, we re talking history but we re also talking almost current events And although Martha Gellhorn is now dead, I feel certain that if she were still alive, she d be observing, investigating, inquiring and writing about similar atrocities in Afghanistan and Iraq After all, was George W Bush s shock and awe qualitatively different from the Nazi doctrine of Schrecklichkeit frightfulness Since I assume this review will be read if at all by Americans, I ll conclude it with a quote from p 281 that speaks to us most directly i t is not easy to be the citizen of a Superpower, nor is it getting easier I would feel isolated with my shame if I were not sure that I belong, among millions of Americans, to a perennial minority of the nation t he obstinate bleeding hearts who will never agree that might makes right and who know that if the end justifies the means, the end is worthless R I P at last, Ms Gellhorn You ve earned it.RRB07 05 13Brooklyn, NY


  3. Dana DesJardins Dana DesJardins says:

    This is an astonishingly brave book, as it would need be, covering conflicts from the Spanish Civil War through the nuclear arms race in the 1980s Gellhorn unerringly finds the underdog in any conflict and suspects power, propaganda, and privilege in other words, her enemies are the right enemies Unfailingly wry, by turns nonplussed and angry, Gellhorn never mitigates her outrage and says, oh so reasonably in 1959, For we are led and must follow whether we want to or not there is no place t This is an astonishingly brave book, as it would need be, covering conflicts from the Spanish Civil War through the nuclear arms race in the 1980s Gellhorn unerringly finds the underdog in any conflict and suspects power, propaganda, and privilege in other words, her enemies are the right enemies Unfailingly wry, by turns nonplussed and angry, Gellhorn never mitigates her outrage and says, oh so reasonably in 1959, For we are led and must follow whether we want to or not there is no place to secede to But we need not follow in silence we still have the right and duty, as private citizens, to keep our own records straight She finds the human face in war, as her title asserts, chronicling the Nazi POW s tears as faithfully as the skeletal survivors in Dachau, which she was among the first to report By the time she writes about the American War in Vietnam, Gellhorn no longer has to stow away in bathrooms on outbound hospital ships to be allowed access to the battlefields, but she focuses rather on refugee camps and villages, deserted town squares in El Salvador, and town meetings in Nicaragua Her outrage has ripened into a compassion so abiding that one almost weeps to read her documentation of suffering, combining facts We left behind in South Vietnam six and a half million destitute refugees and examples A girl of six had received a new arm, ending in a small steel hook to replace her left hand Having steeled oneself to read about the internment camps in Poland in WWII, it is nonetheless shattering to be made witness to the small wars waged between superpowers from the Cold War forward.Everyone should read at least some of this book, divided as it is into short articles reported live from each horror.She ends in her conclusion, written in 1986, We all pay for this Defense, this greatest single industry on earth We, who do not profit from it, support it And what do we get for our money Security Who feels secure As upsetting and moving as this book is, I felt braced by the courage and resolution of not only Gellhorn, but the victims of war on whom she reports And we are all victims May we at least acknowledge what other people must endure Thereby a hard peace might eventually be achieved


  4. Britt Skrabanek Britt Skrabanek says:

    Gellhorn s eye opening perspective on war, from Spain to Finland to Java to Vietnam, is unlike any I ve ever experienced before A bold statement coming from someone who has extensively studied World War II, but I stand by it.Not only was Gellhorn one of the first female war correspondents in history, she was a phenomenal writer as well Her writing is raw and heartfelt, capturing the real moments of war, the fighters on both sides of the front and the non fighters caught in the middle of it all Gellhorn s eye opening perspective on war, from Spain to Finland to Java to Vietnam, is unlike any I ve ever experienced before A bold statement coming from someone who has extensively studied World War II, but I stand by it.Not only was Gellhorn one of the first female war correspondents in history, she was a phenomenal writer as well Her writing is raw and heartfelt, capturing the real moments of war, the fighters on both sides of the front and the non fighters caught in the middle of it all.This is what truly sets Gellhorn apart, as her historical accounts launch off the page with unapologetic feeling, like the grenades, mines, and bombs she loathes Regardless of your interest or disdain for war history, The Face of War is worth a slow read Slow, because you can t rush through this one nor will you want to out of respect for the many souls represented here who lost their lives for their countries, lovers, and families This is the one book that should have been a required reading in history class Yet somehow it didn t make it intoo honest and anti war perhaps The only way I can pay back for what fate and society have handed me is to try, in minor totally useless ways, to make an angry sound against injustice Martha GellhornBritt Skrabanekhttp brittskrabanek.com


  5. Megan O& Megan O& says:

    read Martha or perish She hates Nazis and Reagan so much whatcan you really ask for But you get so muchNamely perfect final sentences and incisive criticism of the powerful Her perspective is historically limited but extremely worthwhile Anyway fuck Hemingway read Martha


  6. Don Groves Don Groves says:

    Picked up this book to compare Gellhorn s reporting with Hemingway and to see how their war coverage differed Sorry, Poppa, Gellhorn kicks your ass While Hemingway s boring me with chauffeurs of Madrid, Gellhorn is talking to the women and children and old men of Spain, China, Vietnam, the ones suffering without political ambition, no bravado, just ordinary people hoping to return to ordinary lives while surrounded by the horror of war.


  7. Adam Adam says:

    The point of these articles is that they are true they tell what I saw Perhaps they will remind others, as they remind me, of the face of war We can hardly be reminded too much or too often I believe that memory and imagination, not nuclear weapons, are the great deterrents Though I have long lost the innocent faith that journalism is a guiding light, I still believe it is a lot better than total darkness.Mistakenly thought this was just about her experience reporting the Spanish Civil The point of these articles is that they are true they tell what I saw Perhaps they will remind others, as they remind me, of the face of war We can hardly be reminded too much or too often I believe that memory and imagination, not nuclear weapons, are the great deterrents Though I have long lost the innocent faith that journalism is a guiding light, I still believe it is a lot better than total darkness.Mistakenly thought this was just about her experience reporting the Spanish Civil War, which I took an interest in after reading Adam Hochschild s Spain in our Hearts which has some great stories about her and Hemingway in Spain Also, I think Hochschild criticizes Gellhorn specifically for missing the revolutionary aspect of the war, especially in Barcelona, but praises her for getting Eleanor Roosevelt to work on getting FDR to support the war, though he never did But no, the book tracks Gellhorn s whole career from covering Spain to Chiang Kai shek s nationalist army in China to the Winter War and WW2 Also Indonesia, Vietnam, the Six Day War and Reagan s backing of right wing death squads in El Salvador and Nicaragua, ending with a piece on Chernobyl Most of it s good, except for the stuff on Vietnam Reading it, I had a sense that it sounded overly optimistic, too favourable to the American side, and sure enough in her epilogue to that section, she admits to having self censored, thinking that, even liberal readers in Britain were not prepared for the full true story The official American version of the war, as a generous effort to save the South Vietnamese people from communism, had been a public relations triumph To dispute it, by showing what the war was actually doing to the South Vietnamese, risked the label of communist propaganda And yet she still gets in a sad portrait of a child napalm victim, which was enough to get her blacklisted from Saigon.Gellhorn has a great Hemingwayesque way of channeling the horrors of war by describing the dead or wounded in simple but visceral terms Some of those images are going to stick with me Not for the squeamish If you liked this, I recommend checking out Nahlah Ayed s A Thousand Farewells.Kindle highlights view spoiler No one need point out my contradictions I know them and feel them I thought that 1939 was at least three years too late to start fighting Hitler and all his cohorts and everything they did and stood for Our victory spared us temporarily from unbearable evil it solved nothing War, when it has any purpose, is an operation which removes, at a specific time, a specific cancer The cancer reappears in different shapes, in different parts of the human race we have learned no preventive medicine for the body of the nations We fall back, again and again, on nearly fatal surgery But the human race has always survived the operation and lived hide spoiler view spoiler The first report in this book was written forty nine years ago After a lifetime of war watching, I see war as an endemic human disease, and governments are the carriers Only governments prepare, declare and prosecute wars There is no record of hordes of citizens, on their own, mobbing the seat of government to clamor for war They must be infected with hate and fear before they catch war fever They have to be taught that they are endangered by an enemy, and that the vital interests of their state are threatened The vital interests of the state, which are always about power, have nothing to do with the vital interests of the citizens, which are private and simple and are always about a better life for themselves and their children You do not kill for such interests, you work for them hide spoiler view spoiler The Canadian troops which I had seen two days ago, going in to attack the Gothic Line, were now swimming in the Adriatic The beaches were laced with barbed wire but holes had been cut through it and engineers appeared with the curious vacuum cleaner like mine detectors, to sweep the beach The infantry, sunburned the color of expensive leather, beautifully strong, beautifully alive, were bouncing around the flat warm sea and racing over the sand as if there were nothing terrible behind them and nothing terrible to come Meantime you could sit on the sand with a book and a drink of sweet Italian rum and watch two British destroyers shelling Rimini, just up the coast see German shells landing on the front three kilometers away follow a pilot in a slowly sinking parachute, after his plane had been shot down hear a few German shells whistle overhead to land two hundred yards farther down and you were getting a fine sunburn and life seemed an excellent invention hide spoiler view spoiler Arresting collaborators is as much a part of cleaning up a town as is the maintenance of the sewage system and the street sweeping hide spoiler Get the feeling she supported the Morgenthau Plan view spoiler So the moral of this story is really short it would be a good thing if the Germans were never allowed to make war again hide spoiler view spoiler But there was much excitement in the headquarters shack a tall towheaded boy with a shining face was passing a box of cigars around and getting heavily beaten on the back His smile was enormous and he couldn t give out cigars fast enough A cable had just come, announcing the birth of a baby daughter Thank God, said the Major, I ve been sweating out that baby for ten days The towheaded pilot showed his cable and a picture of his wife and offered his cigar box How long is a baby he said He held his hands about three feet apart That long Hell, no, said an elderly father of twenty four About so long And he held his hands a foot apart.There followed a heated argument about the length of babies No one spoke of the mission completed or of the missions to come it was after all just another night s work But people didn t become fathers every night becoming a father was really something hide spoiler view spoiler The stunning news of the A bombs, immediately followed by the stunning news of Japan s surrender, came over the radio in St Louis where I was visiting my mother and dawdling on my way to the Orient Like everyone else, I had no idea what these bombs were, but was deeply uneasy since when did two bombs have such an effect Innumerable tons of bombs had never produced final results I remember walking up and down the poorish average income streets of the city, ringing doorbells and asking housewives in curlers and men in undershirts what they thought how about these new bombs, I kept saying, what do you think They were uneasy too, and talked of saving our boys and bringing them home and it was fine the war was ended, but their faces and voices were troubled People weren t throwing their hats in the air and shouting with joy over those bombs, even then, when wild celebration might have been expected hide spoiler view spoiler A Dutchman had told me about Walcheren Island where so many Canadians died to drive out the Germans and he said not a tree was left alive in the flooded wasteland of Walcheren But hundreds of thousands of Dutch people contributed a dollar each to buy a tree, and if there was peace and the island was not flooded again, the trees would grow The Dutch did not fear that anyone wanted to harm them, as they wanted to harm no one It was the great nations who feared and made fear and we looked at each other with sadness, for I belong to a great nation and am no different from him, and we knew it, and we knew that this was true of most of the people of the world hide spoiler view spoiler I was in Dachau when the German armies surrendered unconditionally to the Allies The same half naked skeleton who had been dug out of the death train shuffled back into the doctor s office He said something in Polish his voice was no stronger than a whisper The Polish doctor clapped his hands gently and said, Bravo I asked what they were talking about The war is over, the doctor said Germany is defeated We sat in that room, in that accursed cemetery prison, and no one had anythingto say Still, Dachau seemed to me the most suitable place in Europe to hear the news of victory For surely this war was made to abolish Dachau, and all the other places like Dachau, and everything that Dachau stood for, and to abolish it forever hide spoiler view spoiler The camp leader said, casually, that they had had cholera and plague in this camp but were now vaccinated Plague is beyond my imagination, but I will never forget one close sight of cholera in China a peasant woman staggering towards us like a drunk, then vomiting a torrent of blood, and falling in it, unconscious or dead It is amazing that the refugees stay sane hide spoiler view spoiler As citizens, I think we all have an exhausting duty to know what our governments are up to, and it is cowardice or laziness to ask what can I do about it anyway Every squeak counts, if only in self respect Gloomily, because otherwise I would be ashamed of myself, I made the small effort of a detour to El Salvador hide spoiler view spoiler In 1945, the U.S had produced three nuclear weapons, the A bombs one tested, two used After the Japanese surrender, the end of the Second World War, there was no need or excuse forof these weapons It was the moment to decide in favor of the human species and the planet earth STOP NOW Bulldoze Los Alamos, knock the installations flat, smash the machinery, burn the records, threaten anyone who might pass on information with high treason Sow the place with salt for good measure I like to believe that Franklin Roosevelt would have done it He could have, with no complaints from the citizenry Americans, whose war was particularly in the Pacific, hated Japan, but those bombs felt wrong, unnatural, too doom laden, long before we understood just how different they were from all previous killing tools hide spoiler 1987 edition


  8. Nick Black Nick Black says:

    Beautiful prose, lingering images, and the bravery to honor Israel, that most admirable of nations and so often the whipping boy of the gormless Some of the best war writing I ve ever read2008 10 23 Yesterday outside the Klaus Fortress of Computing, who should I run into but my old roommate and co conspirator Vegan John For those who know him, he and Pam are now married and living on the westside he s a year or so from his condensed matter physics PhD, while she s finishing up Beautiful prose, lingering images, and the bravery to honor Israel, that most admirable of nations and so often the whipping boy of the gormless Some of the best war writing I ve ever read2008 10 23 Yesterday outside the Klaus Fortress of Computing, who should I run into but my old roommate and co conspirator Vegan John For those who know him, he and Pam are now married and living on the westside he s a year or so from his condensed matter physics PhD, while she s finishing up hers in optial physics this semester Over mutual Newports, we talked Bose Einstein condensates and quantum computing and a great deal about the Spanish Civil War It turned out VJ also knew a good bit about the republicanos and nacionales, but from a different perspective than I d picked up from Beevor, Hemingway and Homage to Catalonia He recommended this strongly, and who am I to disagree with the most Vegan of Johns


  9. LeeAnn Heringer LeeAnn Heringer says:

    When I started this book, I was amazed and astounded I flatter myself that I write this way, or maybe it s better to say that I aspire to write this way the poetic attention to detail, the way she notices the little things that say everything about the big things Her reporting of the Spanish Civil War and World War II are so incredibly spot on I was a huge fan.And then we get to the portion about Vietnam And she adopts this tone that she was the only American who had problems with the V When I started this book, I was amazed and astounded I flatter myself that I write this way, or maybe it s better to say that I aspire to write this way the poetic attention to detail, the way she notices the little things that say everything about the big things Her reporting of the Spanish Civil War and World War II are so incredibly spot on I was a huge fan.And then we get to the portion about Vietnam And she adopts this tone that she was the only American who had problems with the Vietnam War which is wrong and that no American soldiers were in an danger which is wrong and makes a great point of not knowing or caring who Robert McNamara was Her reports flirted around the bigger picture of all the millions of, billions of dollars that are spent on refugees without making the refugee lives any better, so where does the money go That is a compelling thread for late twentieth century wars, but because she doesn t see beyond the details, she misses it Her later writings are almost a cautionary tale of how we try to keep using the same filters on different situations, how we age ungracefully by not being flexible enough


  10. Shaun Bossio Shaun Bossio says:

    This was phenomenal for a number of reasons, but mostly because of how fascinating it was to see a female war reporter evolve while witnessing fifty years of horror I stumbled onto Gellhorn because she was Hemingway s third wife, but her writing and intellect help her stand alone I d thoroughly recommend this to anyone remotely interested in an insider s perspective of the changing ed face of why we go to war.


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