[Epub] ↠ Europe: A History Author Norman Davies – Thomashillier.co.uk

Europe: A History Europe A History To Dzie O O Nieprzet Umaczalnym Tytule, Kt Ry Po Polsku Oddaje Europa Rozprawa Historyka Z Histori , To Prawdziwe Opus Magnum Normana Davisa Od Czasu Ukazania Si W Pa Dzierniku 1996 Roku Ten Opas Y Tom Si Gn Nak Adu 200 000 Egz., Spotykaj C Si Z Superlatywami, Ale Tak E Wywo Uj C O Ywione Dyskusje I Kontrowersje W Zachodniej Historiografii Jest To Bodaj Pierwsza Historia Naprawd Ca Ej Europy, Uwzgl Dniaj Ca Dzieje Jej Kres W I Prowincji Tradycyjnie Pomijanych Przez Dziejopisarzy Pozycja Ta Fascynuje Czytelnik W , Kt Rzy Znajd W Niej Znane Ju Walory Pisarstwa Daviesa Literacki Temperament, Rozleg O Zainteresowa , Poczucie Humoru, Osobisty Stosunek Do Tematu.


10 thoughts on “Europe: A History

  1. says:

    It took me 2 months to struggle through the first half of the book with numerous side readings wiki movies To make sure I ve got a clear picture, I even created a timeline with 300 events from pre history to reformation and also hundreds of dots on my Google map Once all the ...


  2. says:

    I read this on a Kindle which in terms of sheer logistics is the best way to read a 1392 page book A book book of this size is just too uncomfortable to read in any other way The Kindle came into its own especially with its notes and highlights features.1392 pages, too little to cover 3 or 4,000 years of complex history of a continent 1392 pages, too many pages to not be bored or overwhelmed with information Davies did this by not writing a conventional history By conventional I mean not by chronology alone He certainly starts at the start with neolithic peoples but he also starts by questioning what is Europe He does a fair bit of historiography throughout questioning assumptions and reviewing what the profession thinks about certain issues and controversies For instance he looks at the basis of Classical Greek civilisation, reviewing the Black Athena thesis and dismissing it.What Davies does is write stories, some very opinionated He writes stories about important aspects of European history For instance when writing about the Roman class system he mentions slavery and goes off on a tangent about the history of slavery in Europe and then he comes back to Rome There is the problem of what sort of reader would like this book If you re a history buff why reread all the ...


  3. says:

    A very big read indeed, but worth every minute you spend on it The author makes a big point of treating the history of the whole of Europe, not just the Western part, and I agree with the author that such a treatment has been long overdue The book is great as an overview work but can also be used to fill in some of the gaps in your historical knowledge, especially about Eastern Europe, since it also goes into some detail However, it is not an introductory work and often assumes that you already know a thing or two.I like the writing style of the author, which really can draw you in sometimes, but he also sometimes gets a bit lost in theoretical musings, or gives too much irrelevant detail such as lists of kings, battles and dates Here and there he also tries to keep up the pace by skipping on the ...


  4. says:

    Can one narrate time time as such, in and of itself Most certainly not, what a foolish undertaking that would be The story would go Time passed, ran on, flowed in a mighty stream, and on and on in the same vein No one with any common sense could call that a narrative. Thomas Mann, The Magic MountainPersonal PrefaceLately I have been thinking a lot about time Well, perhaps thinking isn t the right word I ve been worrying Ever since I moved to Spain, time has been a problem What s the proper time to eat When do people sleep here How long will my job last What about my visa Multiple clocks beset me, counting down and counting up.Beyond my petty troubles, I have been thinking about time as an experience how monotony speeds up the clock s hand, variety slows it down, and nothing can stop it I have been thinking about the inexorability of time every passing second is irretrievable, every yesterday is irrecoverable I have been spending a lot of time remembering, connecting my past with my present, if only artificially, and wondering how much the act of remembering itself distorts my memories And in a Proustian mood, I have wondered whether a tremendous act of remembrance is the only defense we have against the ceaseless tide of time.In the midst of our mundane concerns, it is all too easy to forget to remember But is it crucial to remember otherwise life can go by without us noticing This is why we celebrate birthdays Logically, it is silly to think that you turn fr...


  5. says:

    What an impressive book Even after all those years this work still stands Davies Eastern European speciality adds decisive information and corrects our classic view on European history Also see my review in my Sense of History account


  6. says:

    Davies specializes in Polish history and WWII, but took on a continent sized task The result is a haphazardly organized mish mash that loses its way just as its subject emerges as a concept in the 17th and 18th centuries We get a lot of Eastern European history, at the expense of understanding other nations My Polish background makes that fine by me However, by writing too many books, historians run a danger the need to recycle material Europe is proof At 1136 pages plus loads of appendixes, it s a massive tome It would have been nice to see modern history as usual for sweeping histories, the last 50 years are covered in the last 50 pages Europe , after all, is a modern phenomenon There was no Europe at all in ancient times or the middle ages either Heck, they didn t even have the shape of the continent mapped Not to mention that it s barely even a real continent anyway On some level, therefore, the book is untrue to its title It s really a history of the geographic area we now know as Europe That s a quibble tho I hate those dang titles anyway, so who am I to complain Still, it should have been focused on the modern world.On the other hand, it s a good stab at a difficult impossible synthesis If Davies were a better writer, it d be really solid a 4 I also suspect that he doesn t really know what he s talking about vis a vis anything other than Eastern Europe So he ca...


  7. says:

    Unless you know a whole lot about Europe already, this is a great book to read for the curious lay person and intellectual or for the student It s long, clearly, but very much worth it as a book to read on the side I m a firm believer that histories should neither be told as stories or as simply a collection of facts, but something in between Davies does it to near perfection The writing is smooth and easily understandable for all And, to his great credit, Davies tries hard at writing the history without cultural biases or scholarly biases of any sort obviously this is nearly impossible to do and Davies admits as much in his introduction, which is a great piece of writing in its own right For people who don t like or don t care about history, the introduction alone is worth reading Yet Davies does not fall into the modern trip, either, of exhibiting how evil the good guys actually were the good guys are shown as good and bad, and the bad guys are shown as bad and good the facts are given the most weight and various forms of historical interpretation are offered, though Davies does always give his own conclusions as well The end result is that a reader from any country, the U.S included, can feel proud and embarrassed of their country s exploits with a mostly balanced reading of history.In 1200 pages Davies does an excellent job of...


  8. says:

    4.5Ahh After six months though really two intense months of reading I ve finally finished this monster of a book I m not saying that in quality only in the size of the book The content itself was actually really enjoyable Norman Davies divides his chapters between the the ideas and events that take place in the continent during each respective era He shows how things that happen to one state or part of Europe can have immense effect on another area I really enjoyed getting the broader picture which showed the inter connectivity which allowed me to grasp the fact that many different things happens simultaneously that I probably never would have considered otherwise Sometimes it s difficult to get that from a book that has a much narrower focus.True to his word, Davies strives to give the lesser known areas the attention they deserve especially when it comes to the Eastern sideand even especially, the Polish side This I don t really mind since it is an area of great interest to me, though I feel the need to call the author out on it and compare him to a student who writes an essay and feels the need to include everything he knows on his subject of intere...


  9. says:

    Antik a lardan 1992 ye uzanan upuzun bir maratondu Son 25 y l d ndum Avrupa yine de i iyordu.


  10. says:

    I wavered between 4 and 5 stars, because there are some parts mostly in the beginning that I forced myself to trudge through But that was only because my knowledge of Europe outside of the usual stuff is relatively small, and I was just not able to process all the names and places thrown out I m taking into account that this book is an insane undertaking, and the fact that I was really into the book for around 800 of its 1136 pages is pretty damn impressive The little boxes of random asides scattered throughout the book are great, as are the maps and charts and lists packed in the appendices at the end It really lends itself to being left on the shelf for future reference And the intimate stories that end each chapter serve to wrap up things in each section extremely well...