The Field Guide PDF µ The Field Epub /

The Field Guide ❮Download❯ ➵ The Field Guide Author Tony DiTerlizzi – Thomashillier.co.uk It all starts when Jared Grace finds their great uncle's book, 'Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastic World Around You' and the Grace kids realize that they are not alone in their new house It all starts when Jared Grace finds their great uncle's book, 'Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastic World Around You' and the Grace kids realize that they are not alone in their new house Now the kids want to tell their story but the faeries will The Field Epub / do everything they can to stop them.


10 thoughts on “The Field Guide

  1. Patrick Patrick says:

    I'm reading these books for the second time. But it's been years since I picked them up, and it's the first time I'm reading them with my son. And both of those things make a huge difference to my experience.

    First, and perhaps most importantly, my little boy likes them. He's about five an a half, which is younger than the target age for these books, but he's into them.

    (In the interest of full disclosure, Oot isn't the most critical of readers at this point in his life. He pretty much likes all books.)

    I like the books too. I think they do a great job of blending traditional folklore and the modern world. What's more, they borrow from the traditional lore, and expand on it in interesting ways.

    What's more I *really* like the illustrations. I'd forgotten the books were illustrated, and that really makes it nicer when reading them to my boy. It adds a lot to the experience. I wish I had thought to look through these books for some pointers before I did Slow Regard of Silent things with Nate Taylor.

    All that said, I have some quibbles with these books as a parent. Things that never occurred to me the first time I was reading them. I'll save those comments for the reviews I'll write of the later books in the series, as the issues I'm going to be talking about are more prevalent there...


  2. Bangadybangz Bangadybangz says:

    This was such a fun little book! Short and sweet, quirky and magical, loved it! I've always been a fan of anything to do with fairies and folklore, so I'm definitely pumped to delve more into this exciting world!


  3. Janete Janete says:

    A light and pleasant children's book to improve my English and forget life's difficulties. Scribd book + Brazilian youtube audiobook.

    BLURB: After finding a mysterious, handmade field guide in the attic of the ramshackle old mansion they’ve just moved into, Jared; his twin brother, Simon; and their older sister, Mallory, discover that there’s a magical and maybe dangerous world existing parallel to our own—the world of faerie. The Grace children want to share their story, but the faeries will do everything possible to stop them...


  4. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Field Guide (The Spiderwick Chronicles, #1), Tony DiTerlizzi
    After finding a mysterious, handmade field guide in the attic of the ramshackle old mansion they’ve just moved into, Jared; his twin brother, Simon; and their older sister, Mallory, discover that there’s a magical and maybe dangerous world existing parallel to our own—the world of faerie. The Grace children want to share their story, but the faeries will do everything possible to stop them...
    The first book, The Field Guide, was published in 2003 and then followed by The Seeing Stone (2003), Lucinda's Secret (2003), The Ironwood Tree (2004), and The Wrath of Mulgarath (2004).
    تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز سی ام ماه ژوئن سال 2007 میلادی
    عنوان: کتاب راهنما: کتاب نخست از سری ماجراهای اسپایدرویک؛ نویسندگان: تونی دی ترلیزی؛ هالی بلک؛ مترجم: محمد قصاع؛ تهران، افق، واحد کودک، کتابهای فندق؛ 1385، در 140 ص؛ مصور، شابک: 9789643694258؛ چاپ دوم 1388، چاپ سوم و چهارم 1389، چاپ ششم 1391؛ چاپ دهم 1396؛ موضوع: داستانهای کودکان از نویسندگان امریکایی - سد 21 م
    عنوان: کتاب راهنمای عملی: کتاب نخست از سری ماجراهای اسپایدرویک؛ نویسندگان: تونی دی ترلیزی؛ هالی بلک؛ مترجم: بابک تختی؛ تهران، قصه، 1385، در 128 ص، شابک: 9642647028؛
    عنوان: کتاب راهنما: کتاب نخست از سری ماجراهای اسپایدرویک؛ نویسندگان: تونی دی ترلیزی؛ هالی بلک؛ مترجم: شقایق محمدزاده، ویراستار: حمیدرضا صفایی؛ تهران، آسمان خیال، 1391؛ در 136 ص، شابک: 9789642290680؛
    زنی به نام «هلن گریس»، که به تازگی از شوهرش جدا شده، به همراه پسران دوقلویش: «جارد»، و «سیمون»، و دختر بزرگش «ملوری»، به خانه‌ ای قدیمی، در املاک «اسپایدرویک»، متعلق به «عمه لوسیندا»، اثاث کشی می‌کنند. در شب نخست اقامتشان در خانه ی تازه، «ملوری» پشت دیواری کاذب، یک آسانسور کوچک، و یک کلید عجیب پیدا می‌کند. «جارد»، با استفاده از آسانسور و کلید، به اتاقی مخفی، راه پیدا می‌کند، که متعلق به صاحب قدیمی خانه «آرتور اسپایدرویک» است. «جارد»، با استفاده از کلید، صندوقی را باز کرده، و نوشته‌ های «اسپایدرویک» را، می‌یابد. کتابچه‌ ای که حاوی اسرار سرزمین پریان است، و «اسپایدرویک» طی یادداشتی، از یابنده خواسته، نگاشته های خطرناک کتاب را نخواند. اما «جارد» هشدار را نادیده گرفته، و مهر از کتاب برمیگیرد. مدتی بعد، «جرد» با موجود کوتوله‌ ای به نام: «تیمبل تاک»، برخورد می‌کند، که از موجوداتی کوچک، و معمولاً نامرئی، با وی سخن می‌گوید، و اینکه موجودی پلید، به نام: «مولگارث»، در صدد دستیابی به کتابچه ی «اسپایدرویک» است، تا بر تمامی سرزمین پریان، حکمرانی کند. «اسپایدرویک» سال‌ها پیش، ناپدید شده، اما پیش از رفتن، حصاری جادویی، پیرامون خانه، برای حفاظت از دخترش تعبیه کرده‌ است. «جارد»، موضوع را با برادر، و خواهرش، در میان می‌گذارد، اما آنها حرف‌های «جرد» را، جدی نمی‌گیرند. تا اینکه «سیمون»، توسط بختک‌های شرور «مولگارث» دزدیده، و به اسارت گرفته می‌شود. همزمان «جارد»، با بختکی خوشدل، و دشمن «مولگارث»، به نام: «هاگسکوئیل»، آشنا می‌شود. «مولگارث» نیز، «سیمون» را رها می‌کند، تا کتابچه را برای وی بیاورد. اما «جارد»، و «ملوری»، او را از آن کار برحذر می‌کنند، و در نتیجه، با یورش گسترده ی بختکها به خانه، روبرو می‌شوند. به نظر می‌رسد، تنها کسیکه می‌تواند به آنها یاری کند، وارث خانه، یعنی «لوسیندا» دختر سالخورده ی «اسپایدرویک» است. اما «عمه لوسیندا» به آنها می‌گوید، تنها راه نجات آنها، یافتن «آرتور اسپایدرویک» است، اما او نمی‌تواند، به آن‌ها یاری کند. «مولگراث» سه صفحه از کتاب را می‌دزدد و …؛ دنیایی پر از جن و پری و بختک و موجودات عجیب و غریب؛ سه‌ بچه‌ ی معمولی یعنی «جارد»، «سیمون» و «ملوری» را به سوی خود میکشاند. هر رخدادی در این دنیا رخ میدهد، اما برای هیچکس حتی برای مادرشان نیز باوركردنی نیست. ا. شربیانی


  5. April (Aprilius Maximus) April (Aprilius Maximus) says:

    1.) The Field Guide ★★★
    2.) The Seeing Stone ★★.5

    -----------------------------------------------

    BOOK #6 READ FOR BELIEVATHON ROUND 2.

    [trigger warnings are listed at the bottom of this review and may contain spoilers]

    ★★★

    This didn't read as a separate book in a series, it read as though it was chapter 1 of the first book! There was no solid beginning, middle and end, instead it seemed like just a beginning? I'm confused as to why this series is split into separate books like this when the stories seem so incomplete on their own.

    That being said, I think if I kept reading, I would really enjoy it! It's super spooky and fun!

    trigger warnings: parents separating, outdated and potentially harmful language when referring to people with mental illnesses.


  6. Sh3lly Sh3lly says:

    I read this with my daughter for a school book report. It features three children and their now-single mom, as they move to a dilapidated house owned by an elderly relative.

    Mallory is the eldest and likes fencing. Simon is one of the twin boys and loves animals and science. Jared is the other twin and appears to the trouble-maker of the bunch. They discover they may not be the only inhabitants after stumbling upon a hidden attic with a field guide full of details about fairies.

    Crazy things start happening to the kids, much to the bewilderment - and frustration - of their mother, and the kids must figure out what (or who) is behind the mischief.

    So I asked my daughter how many stars she would give it if 5 was one of my favorite books and 1 was I hated it. She said 4. I think I would agree. This is a very short introduction to the world and premise and I am sure the later books will get into more adventure.

    Apparently, the father divorced the mother and abandoned the kids? I wasn't quite clear on that, but it mentions dad leaving many times. Kind of a serious topic, but it doesn't give any details.


  7. Rachel Rachel says:

    Everything about the packaging and promotion of this book is delightful...the title, the mysterious notes obscuring the back cover synopses, the inclusion of a letter from the three children protagonists to the author. All of that is very nice, but after reading the first installment, I can't help but feel a little robbed.

    First of all, and forgive me for this, I can't help comparing the books to a more cleverly written and altogether smarter series, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Aesthetic similarites aside (and there are many), both series center around the somewhat fantastical adventures of three children, and, more importantly, both series emphasize the importance of children solving their own problems. I'm all for that.

    What irks me about the Chronicles is the authors' lack of subtlety and creativity; take this passage, for instance: Jared watched him go and wondered what he could do. Could he really solve anything by himself? Ironically, the authors seem to underestimate the problem-solving abilities of the kids that are reading these books. Not to mention the first book ends with hardly an introduction; breaking the series into a five-book set feels like a cheap trick to make a profit, and I think the overall flow of the story suffers because of it.

    The Chronicles are not without merit; there is some enjoyable dialogue and the illustrations are terrific. I think the series could be truly engaging if the authors focused more on the story, rather than on spelling out the moral behind it.


  8. Becky Becky says:

    Just your typical 'move into an old creepy house, weird stuff starts happening, one of the kids gets blamed, and then they find a book that explains the existence of fairies/faeries/fey which solves their problems... while at the same time causing many more problems'.

    Happens every day.

    Also, I'm no expert in the sport of fencing, but I'm pretty sure that they don't call the weapon a sword, and someone who is serious about fencing, as Mallory apparently is, would know that.

    I think that this book reads a little young, also. Not just for the length, which is REALLY short, but also in the style and feel of the writing. The characters are 9 year old twins and a 13 year old older sister, but if I had to peg an age range for the target audience, I'd go with 6 or 7 year olds.

    Still, this is probably a fun and cute story for kids. I'm just less than impressed by it, considering that I'm a crotchety 30-something cat lady.


  9. Taylor Knight Taylor Knight says:


    I read the Spiderwick Chronicles back when I was quite young, maybe eight or nine. My sister and I read the crap out these books (we must have read them 15 times, no joke) and I've been wanting to revist this series and the wonderful fantasy world that Holly and Tony created for awhile now but I've finally gotten around to it.

    The writing partnership of Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi is remarkable and this series is by far some of the most well written literature that I've ever read.

    The three main characters, Jared, Simon, and Mallory, are so relatable and realistic. I can relate to each of them in a different way and I think most readers will feel the same.

    Overall, I highly recommend this series to everyone of any age. The Field Guide is such an outstanding start to a series and I can see myself rereading this book a hundred times and still enjoy it just as much as the first time.


  10. C.G. Drews C.G. Drews says:

    I read this for research purposes. I'm pretty sure a boggart is stealing my left socks. OKAY, NO. That's not why I'm researching it! I want to write children's books, and mine turn out too weird, so I thought I'd read more children's books and get a hang of the voice and style. This was an epic example. (It can't be more then 10K, right?) I really enjoyed it. I've watched the movie, and the first book is...what? The first 20 minutes of the movie?! It's such an adorably cute book! But now I'm impressed at how close the movie was following the book. Good stuff.

    I like the quirkiness of the fencing. Adoring the illustrations. And the poems!

    My only complaint is the mother. She's a bit weird. I mean, she was out shopping for groceries and got mad at them for being out of bed at night and in the kitchen. MAD. Angry? Why! They were looking for a squirrel in the walls, and goodness sakes, what type of grocery shop is open at night. Why couldn't she have gone in the morning? And why did she never believe her children?! Parents like that in books frustrate me.

    Anyway. Adorable. Research done. I think I'll read a few more...you know. To solve what that boggart's doing with my socks.


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