WWW: Wake PDF ↠ Hardcover

WWW: Wake ❮PDF / Epub❯ ✅ WWW: Wake ❤ Author Robert J. Sawyer – Thomashillier.co.uk Caitlin Decter is young, pretty, feisty, a genius at math, and blind When she receives an implant to restore her sight, instead of seeing reality she perceives the landscape of the World Wide Web wher Caitlin Decter is young, pretty, feisty, a genius at math, and blind When she receives an implant to restore her sight, instead of seeing reality she perceives the landscape of the World Wide Web where she makes contact with a mysterious consciousness existing only in cyberspace.


10 thoughts on “WWW: Wake

  1. Lightreads Lightreads says:

    I loathed this book Its Hugo nomination makes me cringe This morning I came out of my room with a happy Labrador bouncing around my feet and the sunshine pouring in, and my roommate said, good morning and I said, I hate this book A congenitally blind teenager is fitted with a neural implant to restore her sight, but first it lets her see the internet, where something is coming alive.There are a lot of things wrong with this book cardboard writing, pacing issues, characterization of a tee I loathed this book Its Hugo nomination makes me cringe This morning I came out of my room with a happy Labrador bouncing around my feet and the sunshine pouring in, and my roommate said, good morning and I said, I hate this book A congenitally blind teenager is fitted with a neural implant to restore her sight, but first it lets her see the internet, where something is coming alive.There are a lot of things wrong with this book cardboard writing, pacing issues, characterization of a teenaged girl so off key it was painful, including Livejournal entries that were so tone deaf it was embarrassing But that s not the point here.This book got off on the wrong foot with me before it even started The acknowledgements note a deafblind man who touched the author s life Because, as we all know, the value of people with disabilities is measured by their ability to inspire able bodied people to flights of limping philosophy about what it all means Obviously.Things did improve for a while Sawyer clearly did a certain amount of research about practicalities his blind protagonist uses Jaws and keyboard commands, has a USB Braille display, etc It s funny how your expectations becomedemanding when someone puts out the minimum effort If Sawyer had written some helpless, computer illiterate blind girl, I would have dropped the book, called him a couple uncomplimentary things, and forgotten about it within the week But since he did do the bare minimum, all of the ways he failed become wayimportant A nitpicky example protagonist is IMing at one point Her friend says see you later and protag thinks that she probably actually wrote c u, but she can t tell the difference Er, no See you and c u are absolutely distinguishable auditorially I m listening to the difference right now, and it s huge That sort of fail where the book has a surface layer of proper technology, but absolutely no experiential depth to it.And then we really swung into things Let me summarize Book projects piles of able bodied bullshit onto blind protagonist, who obviously wants to be cured because that s what disabled people want, and who thinks about everything she s missing all the time even though she s been blind since birth and vision is frankly irrelevant to her sensory experiences at this point Me sigh Book all she really wants is to know what beautiful means Me I m blind and I know what beautiful means and I have been moved by beauty fuck you.Book extended passages of awful writing from the point of view of an emerging intelligence Me rubs temples perseveres Book protag has only one disabled figure to relate to, and absolutely no connection to blind culture or history Because Helen Keller is who idiot able bodied authors can be bothered to Google Me pours a drink Book focuses on language in that obnoxious wink wink way able bodied people do when they think they re being sensitive and they re actually just being ablest assholes E.g She wasn t blind, so to speak, to the implications of what she was reading Me bangs head gently into wall for a while Book random incident of sexual assault so that the protag can tell teenaged boy that she doesn t have to see to be able to see right through him The point eventually emerges that the boy has ruined his chances of scoring with the protag, not that, oh wait, that was sexual assault Me weeps quietly Book Has a character explain how autism is nothing to be ashamed of, even though they have kept it a secret in this family and never talk about it and she can t even bring herself to say the word Me numb acceptance Book a doctor explains to protag that she s lucky to have been blind because her gifts with math could have come with inherited autism, but hey maybe they did and her blindnesscured her Because autism is about not making eye contact seriously I don t even fucking know any The phrase dodged a bullet was used Because that s not an ablest metaphor for disability Me emits wounded vowel sounds, emails a blind autistic acquaintance and says fuck a lot Book cutesy anecdote about how blind girl didn t know white people aren t actually white Me Yes she did Being a sentient human being over the age of eight who can fucking read She also knew there were green apples as well as red, having gone to fucking preschool.I could go on More than I already have, I meanDon t lie, you missed me, really


  2. Bradley Bradley says:

    It s been a while since a book brought me to tears It s been a while since a book brought me to tears out of joy and optimism.This one did It wasn t earth shattering, but it was absolutely joyous.Why Well, the main reason is that I absolutely love stories of emergent AIs And when Sawyer applies a lot of very well researched speculations based on only the technology we have now, building a beautiful picture of waking up from first principles I have nothing but respect for this And yet, this It s been a while since a book brought me to tears It s been a while since a book brought me to tears out of joy and optimism.This one did It wasn t earth shattering, but it was absolutely joyous.Why Well, the main reason is that I absolutely love stories of emergent AIs And when Sawyer applies a lot of very well researched speculations based on only the technology we have now, building a beautiful picture of waking up from first principles I have nothing but respect for this And yet, this is hardly the only thing this book is good at The main story is gorgeous as well Young Caitlin has grown up blind but thanks to some equally interesting sight restoring techniques, she discovers she can see the World Wide Web as colorful geometry.Between her own life and discoveries, some very nice parallels with the overall story structure with a team of scientists and a half Bonobo monkey and a quasi revolutionary hacker on the other side of China s Firewall, we ve got a huge, beautiful setup and the first very careful steps of a new consciousness.I can t stress how well this was accomplished This isn t a fly by night story with the same elements but with a tenth the research, care, or intelligence This is a direct commentary on our current science and it actually gave me a sense of real wonder Awe.It also helps that it accurately describes just about all its foundations in not just a clear way, but in an ACCURATE way But what did I love most Okay I m weird I loved the Shannon Entropy Function I want someone to run a plot on me, please Let me sum up something This book ought to be well known It ought to be discussed and enjoyed and in the common zeitgeist of modern SF It isn t a throwaway title meant to pass an afternoon away It s a complex and stand up commentary on what we could all BE, in all the best ways that SF can function.Of course, if I might get to the point sooner, I should refer back to my first statement The book made me cry from joy It OUGHT to be enough to encourage anyone to read it


  3. Michael Michael says:

    Good science fiction speculates on things that are theoretically possible given some of the conditions and advances of our current level of technology In many cases, the advances may be years or decades away from becoming reality, but in the case of Robert J Sawyer s new novel, WWW Wake, part of his speculated future has become a reality far too quickly.It s disconcerting to pick up a novel that speculates on the future and find one plot element concerning an outbreak of a new form of the f Good science fiction speculates on things that are theoretically possible given some of the conditions and advances of our current level of technology In many cases, the advances may be years or decades away from becoming reality, but in the case of Robert J Sawyer s new novel, WWW Wake, part of his speculated future has become a reality far too quickly.It s disconcerting to pick up a novel that speculates on the future and find one plot element concerning an outbreak of a new form of the flu virus In fact, the virus that breaks out is the H1N5 in the novel, possibly some distant cousin of the current virus that is creating a global scare and a potential world wide pandemic.Of course, I shouldn t be shocked that Sawyer has done has homework and is able to predict things that could happen in the near future He s had a long, distinguished career of doing just that and his new novels are always those I look forward to reading next WWW Wake is no exception.The start of a new trilogy of novels, the story follows several different threads One is the story of teenager Catlin Decter, who has been blind since birth A new technology could possibly open give her sight for the first time by making use of the power of the Internet But there s something lurking out in cyberspace, building itself up and slowly becomingandaware of itself.Stir in a story about China s dealing with an outbreak of the H1N5 virus by removing the affected areas and shutting off communication with the outside world for several days and a plot about a highly intelligent hybrid primate and you ve got a lot of ground to cover in this first installment And make no mistake, this is clearly a first installment Sawyer introduces a lot of threads and a lot of fascinating ideas in the course of his story and while he does wrap up most of the immediate plot threads in this novel, he still leaves you hanging in the end, wanting the next installment immediately, if not sooner There s not a character in peril type of cliffhanger here, but instead there are several intriguing points that Sawyer leaves the reader to mull over and consider as we wait for the next installment.But while the book is full of big ideas, those ideas are grounded in identifiable characters The main focus of the story is Catlin and her journey from lack of sight to her new ability to see Sawyer ably puts the reader inside the mind and experience of Catlin, making us see how she works within the world while being blind and how she must learn to adapt to a world where she can see Catlin s story will have you feeling her joy, her frustration and her curious nature in how she relates to the world And a revelation about her father half way through the story is ably set up and paid off in the course of this first installment.The only real criticism I can come up with this one is it ended too soon and left me eager for the next installment And that next installment cannot come soon enough


  4. WarpDrive WarpDrive says:

    Quite original, brilliantly using concepts of information theory, and a pleasant read.PS I am quite happy that I decided to ignore the few negative reviews on this book, but to follow instead the feedbacks by one of my fellow Goodreads friends I have learned that many such reviews are just worthless Actually, since I have been giving much higher weight to my GR friends reviews than to any other reviews, I have very seldomly regretted any of my reading choices so far.


  5. Kara Babcock Kara Babcock says:

    Seldom does a book live up to blurbs like Unforgettable Impossible to put down, as Jack McDevitt says of Wake Usually, such claims are empty hype, even when the book is good Not so with Wake I agree wholeheartedly with McDevitt, for I was 100 pages into the novel before realizing it was 2 AM and I should probably get some sleep There s no way that Wake could be mistaken for an action packed thrill ride or any of those other tired blurb clich s floating around in the critique pool, but Seldom does a book live up to blurbs like Unforgettable Impossible to put down, as Jack McDevitt says of Wake Usually, such claims are empty hype, even when the book is good Not so with Wake I agree wholeheartedly with McDevitt, for I was 100 pages into the novel before realizing it was 2 AM and I should probably get some sleep There s no way that Wake could be mistaken for an action packed thrill ride or any of those other tired blurb clich s floating around in the critique pool, but impossible to put down definitely describes the opening to Robert J Sawyer s new trilogy about an emerging artificial intelligence.For a fairly short volume, and one that lacks any sort of action or suspense, there s a lot packed into Wake The central plot, which deals with Caitlin Decter s bid to gain sight and how this leads her to discover the Web s emergent intelligence, happens against a backdrop of the ongoing information wars in China and research into primate intelligence in the United States Sawyer makes accurate allusions to current technology and scientific developments This sense of scope and style reminds me of how Cory Doctorow writes about technology in his books With ease, these authors transcribe to paper actions and descriptions about technology we use every day but don t always pause to understand how we use it Moreover, because the descriptions are accurate, Sawyer is educating the less technologically adept even as he immerses us in this very human plot So kudos.I call the plot of this book human, even though it concerns an AI, because the nature of being human is the motif that connects all of the disparate subplots in Wake I wish that something beyond theme connected these subplots the critic in me has to profess disappointment that Hobo the chimp s story is only tangential to Caitlin s, at least for now This is a structural issue with the narrative, however, and it doesn t detract from the thematic brilliance of Sawyer s writing.Caitlin often refers to Helen Keller and her writing, as well as a book,The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral MindShe mentions Keller s descriptions of what her thought processes were like before she learned how to communicate and interact with the external world Jaynes The Origin of Consciousness similarly discusses a theory about a turning point in human history where the two halves of the brain managed to talk to each other and act on conscious thoughts instead of instinct.In China, the Communist Party decides to kill several thousand people in a remote province to eliminate the threat of H5N1 To prevent the Chinese people from seeing the inevitable backlash of the world media, it severs all communication outside of China These are the actions of humans, yet the idea of killing thousands of people merely to prevent the spread of an infection seems, at least to me, very inhuman.Then there s the bonobo chimpanzee hybrid, Hobo, who can communicate via sign language and startles everyone when he paints representational art a profile of one of his researchers instead of the typical abstract pictures so far produced by non human primates The way Sawyer portrays Hobo makes him seem farhuman than he actually is, and this is where, as a sceptic, I have to balk Artificial intelligence aside, this is probably the part of the book that relies the most on extrapolation of something we haven t achieved yet I do believe it s possible for apes to use sign language to communicate intelligently don t get me wrong And Sawyer s portrayal of Hobo s humanity serves its purpose of parallelling the development of the Web AI.This final piece of the plot puzzle is what connects the other three, of course When China puts up the Great Firewall, it severs this non sentient entity into two, suddenly enabling it to begin conceiving of time and eventually abstract thought From there, it begins to learn and teach itself new concepts, something that continues up to and after Caitlin discovers its existence Sawyer does his best to portray the alien nature of this intelligence s journey toward sentience while still describing it in terms we can comprehend For the most part, he pulls this off, although I preferred the observations that Caitlin, her father, and Dr Kuroda make about the intelligence s composition as cellular automata over Sawyer s first person depictions of the intelligence The former were just so unique yet tantalizing, since it really drives home the point that the Web is a fluctuating network of constant streaming data and not some sort of static series of Facebook pages and Google search results all stored in a database and delivered to your browser when you hit Go To return to the motif of humanity, however, I d like to point out a section toward the end of the book, in which Caitlin leads the emerging intelligence to Wikipedia, which it consumes eagerly, and then onto Project Gutenberg And then, and then, and then It was The gold mine.The mother lode Not just coded conceptual relationships, not just definitions, not just brief articles.No, these were books Lengthy, in depth treatments of ideas Complex stories Brilliant arguments, profound philosophies, compelling narratives This site, this wonderful Project Gutenberg, contained over 25,000 books rendered in plain ASCII text It took me an eternity eight hours but I absorbed it all every volume, every polemic, every poem, every play, every novel, every short story, ever work of history, of science, of politics I inhaled themand I grew even .Firstly, I d like to note that Sawyer has described precisely how I feel about books, about reading in general, and about wonderful libraries like Project Gutenberg But if you re reading this review, you re probably on Goodreads, and you probably understand, so I won t belabour that point Secondly, while Sawyer is far from the first SF author or scientist to make this point, it s an important one when it comes to discussing how to deal with an artificial intelligence, should we create one or should one emerge spontaneously as it does in Wake It s going to learn Fast And the information we feed it will determine what opinions it forms about humanity.Read over that last paragraph again In eight hours, the AI consumes the sum total of Project Gutenberg s library this is after it s partaken in Wikipedia and in Cyc, an encyclopedia tool specifically designed for teaching AIs In so doing, it has consumed all these myriad works of humanity, works that talk about being human, whether they re philosophy or fiction or scientific in originand it s seen our history How we ve treated each other, continue to treat each other, and how we ve treated this planet.An intelligence that emerges from the World Wide Web emerges from the combined knowledge and information that we humans put on the Web So even if this intelligence itself is not human, everything it learns is going to be a product of humanity, at least at first Whether consciously or not, we re going to shape the first opinions of an emergent intelligence It s something worth considering.Beyond the human angle, Sawyer s crammed so much in here that I m not sure where to start So let s talk about Caitlin s blindness.I m not blind, so I m certainly not congenitally blind, and as such, I ll never really know what Caitlin s world is like Yet Sawyer at least gave me an inkling of what it s like to be blind, both from a conceptual perspective and a technological one One thing I noticed is that instead of providing visual descriptions of places and people around Caitlin, Sawyer is always careful to describe in terms of sound, touch, and smell Caitlin concludes Dr Kuroda is tall because of the direction from which his voice comes but heavy because of the way he wheezes We don t know if he s bald or has thick hair or blue eyes As someone who doesn t really visualize things when I read, I didn t miss the lack of visual description and appreciated this change.Sawyer also introduced me to how the blind and visually impaired interact with the Web Oh, I already knew about screenreaders like JAWS and refreshable Braille displays, etc., but this was the first time I d really thought about how they get used For Caitlin, this was all just normal for her, and through her eyes I began to understand how it was possible to interact with the world in this way.And beyond her blindness, as a person, Caitlin is a well thought out character She s feisty as the jacket copy promises, but she isn t perfect she has a few melt downs and tantrums Still, Sawyer manages to make her a realistic LiveJournal using, ebook reading, iPod listening teen without making her into a caricature or stereotype Now if only she could kick that nasty exposition habit she develops in the second third of the book This is why it was so hard to put down Wake and why the first thing I did upon waking today was pick it up and finish it Sawyer makes me think, but he also makes me look at stuff I already think about in different ways He does this with Caitlin, and he also does this with China The Great Firewall of China is a pretty well known term on the Web Most people are aware of the Chinese government s tight control over the Internet in China, both in terms of access and in terms of content Google s controversial decision to censor its search results, China s tendency to block websites that it finds too seditious or inappropriate, the spyware built into the networks and the computers themselves, etc Let s be honest for a moment For those of us reading Wake in North America or Europe, that s half a world away, and the public consciousness has a fleeting attention span Sawyer reminds us that the oppression in China has been ongoing for decades now, and even if the People s Republic is doomed as some projections claim, that won t stop them from committing further atrocities before they fade into history Fortunately, it isn t all grim dissidents are using the Internet to fight back And while the increasing globalization of the economy does prop up the communist government, it also makes it harder for that government to simply cut off all ties from the outside world Unlike North Korea, which has fewer people and doesn t make stuff for Wal Mart, China is dependent on the outside world The Web connects us, and even when censored, offers hope for freedom.We live in exciting times Well, I suspect that we ve always lived in exciting times ever since our bicameral minds fused and we started to keep track of time But don t doubt that here and now, the present, is full of wonders Just as Apollo 8 s photographs of Earth from space changed how we perceive ourselves, so too is the Web changing how we interact The advancements in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biologyeverything we uncover only shows that there sto learn, but if you thought the Renaissance was exciting, just recall that we know so muchnow We can be terrible, cruel, nearly insanebut when we come together to do good, we can be a wonderful species Wake reminded me of that, of the good and the bad about humanity, of the incredible events and discoveries happening all around us every day It reaffirmed my desire to read and watch and grow and know , my love of learning, and my love of life


  6. Alexis Alexis says:

    Genre trash littering the road on my journey to find literary science fiction.This book is just bad craft, bottom line It s horribly written, the politics seem precious and the wink wink attitude he takes towards mentioning certain political movements just pissed me off If you want to write a political book, great but at least be intellectually honest with me and come out and own it.Also, it s offensive He wouldn t know a teenage girl if one came up to him and kicked him in the head Seriou Genre trash littering the road on my journey to find literary science fiction.This book is just bad craft, bottom line It s horribly written, the politics seem precious and the wink wink attitude he takes towards mentioning certain political movements just pissed me off If you want to write a political book, great but at least be intellectually honest with me and come out and own it.Also, it s offensive He wouldn t know a teenage girl if one came up to him and kicked him in the head Seriously, he d be like, wow, what was THAT His teenage girl main character was not recognizable as anything other than the male constructed social ideal of a teenaged woman she was compliant, non threatening, and still beautiful and smart Bah.His two other story character threads were left hanging, as they never came to any sort of fruition I get that it s a trilogy I won t be reading the rest but even still, that s just lazy He can go read some Zadie Smith and then work out how story threads are meant to happen, you know, by actual, talented writers.For someone who seems so anti corporate ok, that s cool but he certainly drops enough brand names owned by corporate entities to appear as though his novel is a paid advertisement Trust me, you don t need to lean on others brand names to appear relevant.Finally, it was mean spirited, exclusive, and shallow I won t gratify it with detailed descriptions, but needless to say he makes it very clear which types of people he sees as having some kind of diminished humanity, and he feels no shame about further enforcing this lesser than status through his writing So not only did I glean from this that he is a bad writer, but also that he is just an asshole.What a complete and utter waste of time EDIT One last point, and I m totally aware I m going to get skewered for it by trufans But placing an inherent moral value on various legal concepts is just stupid and naive Open sourcing isn t inherently good, and intellectual property isn t inherently bad Newsflash We live in a world chock full of complex moral concepts But by portraying it this way as if there were no other possible interpretation, he just comes off as poorly educated and simple And what s worse, he comes off as though he genuinely feels like his readers are stupid And that s just insulting


  7. Jacob Proffitt Jacob Proffitt says:

    I enjoyed parts of this very well Caitlin was made of win and her story was both engaging and entertaining Sawyer did an outstanding job getting into the head of a blind fifteen year old girl and giving us her perspective as she goes through the ups and downs of gaining sight Seriously, if that d been all this story was, it would have been an easy four stars with the possibility of five.Unfortunately, Sawyer treats us to a number of perspective shifts at almost random intervals Some of tho I enjoyed parts of this very well Caitlin was made of win and her story was both engaging and entertaining Sawyer did an outstanding job getting into the head of a blind fifteen year old girl and giving us her perspective as she goes through the ups and downs of gaining sight Seriously, if that d been all this story was, it would have been an easy four stars with the possibility of five.Unfortunately, Sawyer treats us to a number of perspective shifts at almost random intervals Some of those develop into something Some of them disappear half way through Some felt like he was trying to be all deep and stuff trying So while interrupting the story I cared about, they also felt kind of off puttingly pretentious as well.Those were annoying, but worse to me were the huge logic problems with the sci fi aspects of the story the emergence of a self aware web entity of some kind Now this wouldn t have been so bad, except that Sawyer boxes himself in a bit You see, one of the PoVs that we get is from this entity as it begins to discover itself Which means he robs himself of being able to black box how things happen Details in spoiler tag, though none of this is really surprising view spoiler Indeed, he goes so far as to give a primer on ASCII encoding as the entity learns the characters by seeing them through Caitlin s eye Which means that an entity that is born digital can t interpret digital encoding but can interpret the messages the optic nerve sends to a human brain Wait, no, it can interpret the messages the optic nerve sends to a human brain that have been digitally encoded to traverse the internet Sawyer lost me entirely here because he spent so much time explaining the digital stuff and that part is all pretty accurate and reasonably well explained without bogging down the story But because that s accurate, being so very, very illogical on the entity being able to see out of Caitlin s eye just blew me out of the story Every time it came up, I had to expend effort refraining from having arguments with Sawyer in my head And that s before having it catch a single letter s encoding from a page on the internet that s meant to teach children to read Like there s a webpage out there that sends a single ASCII character one at a time without also sending, I dunno, font size instructions Or a big ole picture of the letter I could get into the programming of it, and yeah, maybe somebody has done this, but that Caitlin should find the one idiotically bit conscious website for teaching the alphabet in the world strains credulity to breaking hide spoiler So anyway, there were other minor quibbles stereotypes of intelligence and learning, mostly , but the spoiler one really killed me I stuck with it for Caitlin, but sometimes that was hard She was worth it, though Lovely girl, great character, and a lot of fun to spend some time with.Fortunately for me , the ending of this book is extremely satisfying I think I m much happier with my own imaginings of what happens next without having to worry about Sawyer stepping on himself again, or transient PoVs that I don t care about


  8. Alan Alan says:

    Robert J Sawyer is a prolific author known for writing popular, workmanlike science fiction, and WWW Wake is no exception His work is also not especially adventurous and this book is no exception there, either I enjoyed reading this novel although be warned it s the first in Yet Another Series , but it was something of a guilty pleasure.Sawyer s take on the well worn theme of a nascent artificial intelligence could have been entitled When H.A.R.L.I.E Was Web 2.0 already a familiar riff Robert J Sawyer is a prolific author known for writing popular, workmanlike science fiction, and WWW Wake is no exception His work is also not especially adventurous and this book is no exception there, either I enjoyed reading this novel although be warned it s the first in Yet Another Series , but it was something of a guilty pleasure.Sawyer s take on the well worn theme of a nascent artificial intelligence could have been entitled When H.A.R.L.I.E Was Web 2.0 already a familiar riff for anyone familiar with 20th Century sf by the likes of David Gerrold When H.A.R.L.I.E Was One , Robert A Heinlein The Moon is a Harsh Mistress , William Gibson Neuromancer , Thomas J Ryan The Adolescence of P 1 , D.F Jones Colossus et seq. or any number of other works Sawyer s newer take on the trope does seem fairly plausible, perhaps because it does take into account somemodern aspects of network architecture, cellular automata and the like, but he really doesn t break any new ground here.And his kitchen sink approach to the novel s backstory isn t much help either Frequent Wikipedia like paragraphs on Julian Jaynes, and others on Stephen Wolfram, to name two, are jarring interruptions Sawyer doesn t seem to have been able to resist showing off the research he did in order to write this book which is fine, I suppose, but it should have been saved for an afterword or annotated bibliography, rather than shoehorned into the narrative.Nevertheless, I am a sucker for the theme, familiar though it is, and I quickly found myself warming to Sawyer s protagonist Caitlin, a teenaged girl with a bent for math and a fish out of water appeal as she finds herself transplanted from Austin, Texas to Toronto Caitlin s also blind, but in a unique way that turns out to be amenable to a computational fix The side effect of the fix and Sawyer does a fairly good job of portraying this, actually is that Caitlin becomes able to visualize the Web directly, in a way that sighted people can t This gives her an edge when detecting the anomalies that turn out to be the awakening Web.I m damning this book with faint praise here, and I probably shouldn t if you like this sort of thing, you will definitely like this book it s a well done example of its type But I couldn t help wantingout of WWW Wake than a few hours entertainment and that s all I got, this time


  9. Alex Telander Alex Telander says:

    From an author who has written a number of books and has won just about every award a science fiction author can comes one of the most original and fascinating novels to be published in a long time It s one of those books that has just as much right to be on a fiction shelf with other literature classics WWW Wake is the first in a trilogy about a blind girl, Caitlin Decter, who undergoes new and theoretical surgery in Japan to bring back her sight With an implant in one eye, signals are sent From an author who has written a number of books and has won just about every award a science fiction author can comes one of the most original and fascinating novels to be published in a long time It s one of those books that has just as much right to be on a fiction shelf with other literature classics WWW Wake is the first in a trilogy about a blind girl, Caitlin Decter, who undergoes new and theoretical surgery in Japan to bring back her sight With an implant in one eye, signals are sent to a small machine via bluetooth, which Caitlin refers to as her eyepod Patches and downloads for the software for the eyepod are made online, as Caitlin returns to Canada With a new patch, she begins to see something that is not real life She soon realizes it s a view of the Internet through a browser though she has no control over what she s seeing Then with another patch update, Caitlin begins to see through the eye with the implant and her life is changed Yet there is still something on the Internet that is apparently alive, communicating with her at first through her restricted sight and then online with her, and it s intelligence is growing rapidly The book ends at this point, along with something very strange going on in a China, and an ape who is somehow able to paint pictures of people WWW WAKE is a book that will grow on you as you read it Sawyer has done a fantastic job of researching the science, but also throws in lots of references that any savvy Internet user will recognize, appreciate, and be amused about as well as putting the readers in the mind of a blind person and how they do the amazing things they do each day By the end of the book readers will be impatiently wanting the sequel, WWW WATCH due out in 2010.Forbook reviews and exclusive author interviews, go to BookBanter


  10. Lisa Vegan Lisa Vegan says:

    This was an incredibly fast read, and I really enjoyed the story.I loved the premise I loved all the subplots, event though some of them are abruptly dropped, at least in this first book it is a trilogy All the parts of this book did make sense to me though and they did all converge well.After the first several pages, I completely enjoyed Caitlin Decter, an almost sixteen year old girl who has been blind since birth, and then gets an opportunity to have an operation that might allow her to se This was an incredibly fast read, and I really enjoyed the story.I loved the premise I loved all the subplots, event though some of them are abruptly dropped, at least in this first book it is a trilogy All the parts of this book did make sense to me though and they did all converge well.After the first several pages, I completely enjoyed Caitlin Decter, an almost sixteen year old girl who has been blind since birth, and then gets an opportunity to have an operation that might allow her to see I found her to be likeable and interesting I was fascinated with all the Helen Keller quotes and information about her life I ve always been interested in her, and using her as an example in this particular story was a brilliant move.I appreciated all the secondary characters including the Decter s cat, Caitlin s father very interesting and mother, Hobo and his humans, Sinanthropus, Masayuki Kuroda, Bashira, and some others In fact, not too far into the book, there were so many characters, I was afraid I wouldn t remember them all, but the narrative actually ended up being very easy to follow But, Caitlin and the not so mysterious entity Caitlin is able to see first , are the most compelling characters.There s some interesting stuff here about blindness, and vision, the world wide web WWW , sentience, language, etc It might not be great literature, but I found it thought provoking.This is my first Robert J Sawyer book His website is at sfwriter.com, and he s got some interesting group discussion questions for this book.This book is the first book in a trilogy and, while it works okay as a standalone book, I am curious about what happens next I will most likely read the second and third books, although I might wait to see whether other Goodreads members rate book two as highly as they do this one


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