How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the FACup PDF/EPUB


How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the FACup [PDF / Epub] ☄ How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the FACup Author J.L. Carr – Thomashillier.co.uk This classic humour novel chronicles the momentous journey of Steeple Sinderby an unremarkable Fenland village from the mire of obscurity to national heroics This unbelievable feat is contrived by the This classic humour novel chronicles the momentous Sinderby Wanderers eBook ¸ journey of Steeple Sinderby an unremarkable Fenland village from the mire of obscurity to national heroics This unbelievable feat is contrived by the serendipitous How Steeple ePUB ½ meeting of three great men Mr Fangfoss who cares nothing for football Dr Kossuth a Hungarian academic and headmaster of the village school and the Wanderers captain Alex Slingsby a mighty warrior Steeple Sinderby Wanderers PDF/EPUB ä biding his time in uiet Sinderby for the chance to rise once.

  • Hardcover
  • 160 pages
  • How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the FACup
  • J.L. Carr
  • English
  • 27 September 2016
  • 9781853753633

About the Author: J.L. Carr

Carr was born in Thirsk Junction Carlton Sinderby Wanderers eBook ¸ Miniott Yorkshire into a Wesleyan Methodist family His father Joseph the eleventh son of a farmer went to work for the railways eventually becoming How Steeple ePUB ½ a station master for the North Eastern Railway Carr was given the same Christian name as his father and the middle name Lloyd after David Lloyd George the Liberal Chancellor of the Steeple Sinderby Wanderers PDF/EPUB ä Excheuer He adopte.



10 thoughts on “How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the FACup

  1. Hugh Hugh says:

    I read this rather charming short novel as a little light relief before starting on the remaining books on this year's Booker longlist At heart it is a wish fulfilment fantasy about a village football team who by following a mysterious Hungarian guru's plan succeed in achieving every small football club's impossible dream proceeding all the way to the FA Cup final and winning that too If that were all there was to the story it would be at best an interesting oddity and an enjoyable comic fantasy but Carr's genius is making everything double edged by choosing to tell the story from much later after everything has fallen apart By concentrating on the details and acute observations of the realities of life in small rural communities he succeeds in adding a interesting layer to the story indeed the narrator is much interested in the characters and their machinations than in the game itself

  2. Cody Cody says:

    This is some kind of wonderful

  3. Zuberino Zuberino says:

    Another book that reaches out of the mists of time to touch my face I first came across this name in the pages of my Rhodri Jones in Grade 6 and often wondered what it could possibly be like? What a curious title after all Carr's A Month in the Country happens to be one of my all time favourite books a magnificent Proustian madeleine of a novella and as fine a rendering of a vanished rural England as you are likely to find in print Add to that lashings of Great War trauma and you have the makings of a timeless classic one whose status has only been enhanced in the decades since its cause furthered further by the wonderful Channel 4 movie of the same name Interestingly Carr ends Sinderby on much that same note one of plangent nostalgia and a narrator felled by breathtaking grief at the passage of time Otherwise Sinderby is a perfectly charming novel full of gentle wit and humour semi convincingly evoking the glorious Road to Wembley that an unheralded village team rode all the way to eternal glory I say semi because Leicester City proved once and for all that fairy tales on the football pitch do come true even at real life odds of 5000 1 And how fitting that the Foxes feature very early in the book I can't help but wonder what happened to sales of THIS book during THAT season Carr's view of Englishness is both idiosyncratic and highly indulgent a take that is not necessarily shared by the likes of me To the robbed citizens of the extinct Empire English nostalgia acts mainly as a strong emetic even when it is wrapped in prelapsarian innocence such as this Still if you find that your faith in humanity is failing a little if you are feeling listless and shopworn you could do worse than to turn to Jim Carr's prose as a restorative to the spirit He had a bittersweet and loving take on the foibles of his fellow man one that doesn't grow old even on repeated acuaintance Sinji next perhaps?

  4. Venky Venky says:

    The incredible Leicester City side that pulled what arguably has been the most endearing and unsuspected rabbit out of a priceless hat in 2016 might in all probability have been influenced by the fictional exploits of the motely crew that is Steeple Sinderby Wanderers The factual miracle of Claudio Ranieri's side has an eerie similarity excepting the decrepit facilities of the Wanderers and a home turf that is barely above water level to the fortitude of Alex Slingsby's sideThis moving laugh riot by JLCarr has all the ingredients of a sure shot bestseller Hilarious protagonists a heartwarming swarm of humanity to egg on their heroes and a multitude of chaotic settings all make for one captivating roller coaster of a read The humour is fantastic and the plot is just about perfect neither overcooked nor underdone The road to Wembley from the unremarkable village of Fenland is the brainchild of the indefatigably resourceful Professor Kossuth a Hungarian immigrant Extrapolating his ingenious teaching methods at school to the game of football Kossuth with the able backing of MrFangfoss who is the Chairman of virtually everything that could conceivably need chairing at Fenland manages to mould together a team of diverse charactersSporting an attire that is buttercup yellow the Sinderby Wanderers' main stars are Monkey Tonks a goal keeper who before the trials has never kicked or grabbed a football in his life the Shooting Star Swift who once was a rising star for a 1st Division side but who is now leading a reclusive life and Alexander Slinngsby who has sacrificed a potential career in football to tend to his invalid wife Diana This team strung up on short notice follows 7 precepts postulated by Kossuth and popularly known as the Kossuth postulates How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers proceed to demolish every opponent obscure and decorated before finally dismantling the much vaunted Glasgow Rangers at the hallowed turf of Wembley takes up a major portion of this endearingly rib tickling book

  5. JacquiWine JacquiWine says:

    The British writer and publisher J L Carr is undoubtedly best known for his masterpiece A Month in the Country 1980 a book I truly adore Nevertheless this author is much than a one book wonder as his excellent 1975 novella How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the FA Cup clearly demonstratesI loved this tale of the plucky underdogs – titular non leaguers Steeple Sinderby Wanderers – overcoming all the odds to beat the mighty Glasgow Rangers scooping the much prized FA Cup in the process Although very different in style to Carr’s most famous work How Steeple Sinderby shares something of that novella’s tone an air of wistfulness and longing for halcyon times pastIn short the book charts the progress of a village football team who through a combination of talent discipline and determination achieve their dream of going all the way to cup final and snatching victory in the game’s closing minutesAnd then the truly magnificent Slingsby who had withstood this assault like a rock gathered the ball and on the turn sueezed a fierce low kick from the scrum And one wondered one wondered if this had been plotted months ago when this village side was still lost in the obscurity of the midland plains It had been All or Nothing Nothing if McGarrity had scored Nothing if Wilmslow hadn’t risen from the earth If if if p111Crucial to the team are its key players centre forward Sid Smith a once promising striker now lured out of retirement; Monkey Tonks the local milkman whose strength and agility make him an ideal candidate for goalkeeper; and last but not least Alan Slingsby whose earlier career at Aston Villa was cut short due to his wife’s need for round the clock careTo read the rest of my review please visit

  6. Sashankh Kale Sashankh Kale says:

    A fantastic book Sharp witty and poignant

  7. Wynne Wynne says:

    Read this on a drowsy afternoon I happened to see it in the library having read and loved a month in the country some time before that It is very different but there is one thing that holds true for both books they’re books about a time that is now past which has never and will never come again into the lives of those who lived it And it is that mixed ache of melancholy and nostalgia and love that makes his books glow for me But anyway this book is obviously a lot lighthearted It’s astonishingly funny and weirdly plausible I loved the cast of characters Would absolutely read this again and again

  8. Eric Sutton Eric Sutton says:

    A cute little satire about English football which I needed after a heavy week and some rather heavy reads of late I think the FA Cup is one of the greatest competitions in all of sport because even the smallest amateur clubs are competing alongside the likes of the big Manchester and London clubs Steeple Sinderby Wanderers is one such minnow comprised of milk men the local parson and a few rough gems who have fallen into oblivion They follow a simple footballing philosophy but also use to their advantage an uneven pitch that partially floods as a means of besting their superiors Carr is writing a comedy; the narration is unreliable a lovestruck amateur reporter piecing together their famous season through observation newspaper clippings and hearsay and the events hyperbolic but he is envisaging the story of every small club's dream and the football action he writes is anything but far fetched aside from perhaps the match against Manchester United What I really enjoyed about the novel was the behind the scenes look at managing a small football club ticket sales parking sponsors kits enterprising ownership Carr does well in presenting the myriad aspects of the club's brush with fame and like his Booker nominated A Month in the Country the prose is steeped in the nostalgia of witnessing an extraordinary series of events unfold before you while knowing that it's too good to last The idiomatic British wit often went over my head which is my only real critiue Otherwise it's a nice book on football up there with Fever Pitch Home and Away and The Boy on the Shed if you're looking for any other titles

  9. Deepa Vasudevan Deepa Vasudevan says:

    Funny well written absolute gem of 122 pages

  10. Martin Empson Martin Empson says:

    One of the funniest and most poignant books I've read for many years You don't actually need to like football to enjoy it

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