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Quantum Computing for Everyone ☆ [PDF / Epub] ★ Quantum Computing for Everyone By Chris Bernhardt ✩ – Thomashillier.co.uk An accessible introduction to an exciting new area in computation, explaining such topics as qubits, entanglement, and quantum teleportation for the general readerQuantum computing is a beautiful fusi An accessible introduction to an exciting new area in computation, explaining such topics as qubits, entanglement, and quantum teleportation for the general readerQuantum computing is a beautiful fusion of quantum physics and computer science, incorporating some of the most stunning ideas from twentieth century physics into an entirely new way of thinking about computation In this book, Chris Bernhardt offers an introduction to quantum computing that is accessible to anyone who is comfortable with high school mathematics He explains qubits, entanglement, quantum teleportation, quantum algorithms, and other quantum related topics as clearly as Quantum Computing Epub / possible for the general reader Bernhardt, a mathematician himself, simplifies the mathematics as much as he can and provides elementary examples that illustrate both how the math works and what it meansBernhardt introduces the basic unit of quantum computing, the qubit, and explains how the qubit can be measured discusses entanglement which, he says, is easier to describe mathematically than verbally and what it means when two qubits are entangled citing Einstein s characterization of what happens when the measurement of one entangled qubit affects the second as spooky action at a distance and introduces quantum cryptography He recaps standard topics in classical computing bits, gates, and logic and describes Edward Fredkin s ingenious billiard ball computer He defines quantum gates, considers the speed of quantum algorithms, and describes the building of quantum computers By the end of the book, readers understand that quantum computing and classical computing are not two distinct disciplines, and that quantum computing is the fundamental form of computing The basic unit of computation is the qubit, not the bit.

    Free Unlimited eBook unit of quantum computing, the qubit, and explains how the qubit can be measured discusses entanglement which, he says, is easier to describe mathematically than verbally and what it means when two qubits are entangled citing Einstein s characterization of what happens when the measurement of one entangled qubit affects the second as spooky action at a distance and introduces quantum cryptography He recaps standard topics in classical computing bits, gates, and logic and describes Edward Fredkin s ingenious billiard ball computer He defines quantum gates, considers the speed of quantum algorithms, and describes the building of quantum computers By the end of the book, readers understand that quantum computing and classical computing are not two distinct disciplines, and that quantum computing is the fundamental form of computing The basic unit of computation is the qubit, not the bit."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 216 pages
  • Quantum Computing for Everyone
  • Chris Bernhardt
  • 13 October 2018
  • 0262039257

About the Author: Chris Bernhardt

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Quantum Computing for Everyone book, this is one of the most wanted Chris Bernhardt author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Quantum Computing for Everyone

  1. Dan Graser Dan Graser says:

    While this is a decent introduction to many of the fundamental concepts in quantum mechanics and quantum computing, this is certainly not quantum computing for everyone Simply put, this is a book designed for those with a pre existing mathematical background who wish to understand several important mathematical concepts which brought about the possibilities of harnessing the qubit This is not a book for the lay person nor one which will bring you up to speed with the field of quantum computing While this is a decent introduction to many of the fundamental concepts in quantum mechanics and quantum computing, this is certainly not quantum computing for everyone Simply put, this is a book designed for those with a pre existing mathematical background who wish to understand several important mathematical concepts which brought about the possibilities of harnessing the qubit This is not a book for the lay person nor one which will bring you up to speed with the field of quantum computing by the end of it, rather, if you take your time you will be left with a satisfactory understanding on a mathematical level as to how such feats have been made possible Difficult to recommend broadly due to the heavy and I mean heavy reliance on equations and advanced algebraic knowledge

  2. Frederick Gault Frederick Gault says:

    Not for everybody I took matrix algebra in college and did ok, so I could follow along for the first few chapters, but I rapidly reached the point where I just read the text and ignored the math Why I took it on faith that the math showed what the author wrote and that was enough to make this still worth reading I learned a lot for example, entanglement does NOT mean that information can be transmitted faster than the speed of lightthe Science Fiction reader in me was very disappoi Not for everybody I took matrix algebra in college and did ok, so I could follow along for the first few chapters, but I rapidly reached the point where I just read the text and ignored the math Why I took it on faith that the math showed what the author wrote and that was enough to make this still worth reading I learned a lot for example, entanglement does NOT mean that information can be transmitted faster than the speed of lightthe Science Fiction reader in me was very disappointed to read that Also of interest is the fact that there are quantum algorithms and indeed quantum computers available for general use via the internet I m not enough of a math person to say with any conviction that this book will help you grok quantum algorithms but my guess is that for the right person with enough vector algebra and the desire to stick to it this book could put him or her over the top

  3. Ashvin Nagarajan Ashvin Nagarajan says:

    Bernhardt provides an excellent insight into the rapidly growing field of Quantum Computing in this easy to digest text I was looking for an introductory text into the field that contained up to date information since the field has changed significantly in the last 10 years This text provides a simple explanation of the challenging mathematics of quantum computers and insight into quantum gates The language and notation of this field are explained excellently Taking a class on linear algebra Bernhardt provides an excellent insight into the rapidly growing field of Quantum Computing in this easy to digest text I was looking for an introductory text into the field that contained up to date information since the field has changed significantly in the last 10 years This text provides a simple explanation of the challenging mathematics of quantum computers and insight into quantum gates The language and notation of this field are explained excellently Taking a class on linear algebra before reading this book would be very helpful

  4. Matt Heavner Matt Heavner says:

    Good accessible overview of quantum computing Avoids complex math formalisms in a good way A few topics in the last two chapters were forced in and too briefly discussed seemed like the author really, really wanted to include them, but wanted to keep the book brief so didn t do them justice.Caveat I found this very accessible, but do have a PhD in physics, so calibrate this review appropriately.

  5. Baris Tura Baris Tura says:

    Opens a Gate to a New RealmI really enjoyed the book Took notes, tried to perform calculations on my own Quantum world has unique properties This book shows how we can manipulate quantum mechanics to build quantum computers It shows the logic underlying quantum computation simplifying the language as much as possible It might still seem confusing, though Author briefly explains the math we need such as linear algebra and logic gates Good job.

  6. Sam Sam says:

    This is really quite a gentle introduction into quantum computing Yeah, it requires some prerequisites like linear algebra and understanding of classic computing, but Bernhardt explains these concepts in the beginning, so after this the fundamental nature of quantum computing becomes clear not crystal clear, but at least it doesn t seem like some kind of magic Though, it isa texbook, rather than popular science, so it requires some perseverance to finish it.

  7. Paweł Rusin Paweł Rusin says:

    Up until now, when I read about quantum mechanics it was always explained only with words and because of that, I had trouble with wrapping my head around it I loved that this book showed math behind quantum effects and had you work through it.

  8. Stephen Stephen says:

    This book was good but the math was not trivial The use of tensor products is a case in point I liked some chaptersthan others and particularly liked his concluding remarks however, if given the chance again I d pass on this one.

  9. Benjamin Jordan Benjamin Jordan says:

    This is a hard philosophy book, if such a thing exists It explains the basis of quantum computing with such mathematical rigor that you cannot but wholeheartedly agree with the author sabstract conclusions on computing and its place in the universe I will be thinking about this book for some time.

  10. Mackenzie Mackenzie says:

    Loved this book Presents a simplified model so that a reader with a decent linear algebra background can follow along with the theory.

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