[Read] ➲ A History of the World in 6 Glasses By Tom Standage – Thomashillier.co.uk


A History of the World in 6 Glasses Throughout Human History, Certain Drinks Have Done Much Than Just Quench Thirst As Tom Standage Relates With Authority And Charm, Six Of Them Have Had A Surprisingly Pervasive Influence On The Course Of History, Becoming The Defining Drink During A Pivotal Historical Period A History Of The World In 6 Glasses Tells The Story Of Humanity From The Stone Age To The 21st Century Through The Lens Of Beer, Wine, Spirits, Coffee, Tea, And Cola Beer Was First Made In The Fertile Crescent And By 3000 B.C.E Was So Important To Mesopotamia And Egypt That It Was Used To Pay Wages In Ancient Greece Wine Became The Main Export Of Her Vast Seaborne Trade, Helping Spread Greek Culture Abroad Spirits Such As Brandy And Rum Fueled The Age Of Exploration, Fortifying Seamen On Long Voyages And Oiling The Pernicious Slave Trade Although Coffee Originated In The Arab World, It Stoked Revolutionary Thought In Europe During The Age Of Reason, When Coffeehouses Became Centers Of Intellectual Exchange And Hundreds Of Years After The Chinese Began Drinking Tea, It Became Especially Popular In Britain, With Far Reaching Effects On British Foreign Policy Finally, Though Carbonated Drinks Were Invented In 18th Century Europe They Became A 20th Century Phenomenon, And Coca Cola In Particular Is The Leading Symbol Of Globalization.For Tom Standage, Each Drink Is A Kind Of Technology, A Catalyst For Advancing Culture By Which He Demonstrates The Intricate Interplay Of Different Civilizations You May Never Look At Your Favorite Drink The Same Way Again.


10 thoughts on “A History of the World in 6 Glasses

  1. says:

    First off, let me just say that if the concept of this book interests you, by all means you should read it It s light and breezy, and you stand to lose very little by taking the time However, I have to say that my feelings about this book are very conflicted In terms of quality, the book is clearly delineated into two halves the half discussing alcoholic drinks, and the half discussing caffeinated drinks Throughout the first portion of the book, which focuses on beer, wine, and spirits, I was a bit bored, and found myself becoming frustrated at how repetitive Standage s writing could be It seemed like there just wasn t enough substance to back up Standage s claims of how dramatically these beverages had impacted human history, and the facts and arguments he did provide were often repeated in subtly different ways throughout a given section I was still interested in the material of this half of the book, I just didn t find it particularly compelling The second half, by contrast, really delivered on the promise of the...


  2. says:

    Whoever the marketing guy was behind Erik Larson s The Devil in the White City Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America, he was a genius Because honestly, I don t really want to read a 447 page history of the Chicago World s Fair and I m guessing, neither do you But, if you were hoodwinked into believing as I was that Larson s opus was an inspired bit of comparison between the architect of the 1893 World s Fair and a diabolically brilliant psychopath and kept reading because you were waiting for the numerous opportunities Larson had to make this happen and then realized somewhere about two thirds of the way through that he had perhaps added the bit about the serial killer because he realized that no one would probably read the book if it didn t have some sort of hook and then you noticed that Larson sort of pulled it off anyway and just bear with me one moment here you realized years later that the passages you most remember in the book were these tremendously well crafted passages about the World s Fair itself juxtaposed with a noirish filth ridden Chicago, you might, li...


  3. says:

    This book should really be called A History of the Western World in 6 Glasses, as it doesn t consider the drinks of South America, Sub Saharan Africa, Oceania, and much of Asia Indeed, tea is considered only through the lens of the British empire, even though the formal Japanese tea service is arguably interesting than a British tea party Even as a Western history, it kind of fails, as there s a large gap between wine production in the Roman empire and the distillation of rum in Barbados This can only be viewed as a surface history of the world, but as far as surface stories go, it s pretty interesting.Throughout the book, Standage tells the history of six beverages beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and Coca Cola as they appeared in the historical record This is actually not so great, as the book ends up talking about beer without ever mentioning Germany, and wine without ever mentioning France or California Instead of bringing it all back together in the epilogue, he j...


  4. says:

    I noticed this book on a few friend s to read lists and thought I should write a review on it since I have read it a few years back and it is still very much part of our family s proud intellectual history8 We do not realize how necessary fluids are for our survival As Tom Standage states, we can live without food for quite a while, but will die very soon of fluid deprivation In fact, aren t we looking for water on Mars before we migrate there Initially I did not plan to buy this book I was trying to find The Devil s Cup A History of the World According to Coffee by Stewart Lee Allen Tom Standage divided the history of the world into six periods, each forming a different chapter in the book Beer in Mesopotamia and Egypt Wine in Greece and Rome Spirits in the Colonial Period Coffee in the Age of Reason Tea and the British empire Coca Cola and the Rise of America Three are alcohol beverages and three caffeine The idea for the book came to Tom Standage while reading an article in my Sunday newspaper about a wine said to have been one of Napoleon s favourites during exile Vin de Constance It is a sweet wine, made in the Constantia region of South Africa, which was popular in the 18th and 19th centuries In Jane Austen s Sense and Sensibility, the heroine is advised to drink it because of it s healing powers on a disappointed heart Charles Dickens also mentions the wine, referring in The Mystery of Edwin Drood to the support embodied in a gl...


  5. says:

    This book, I ve read twice It takes you from the formation of beer and society in Mesopotamia, to the use of wine as currency and how wine types represented a social classification system in Greece and Rome It went through spirits and colonial time We only have whiskey because it took too long to ship scotch and brandy by wagon out west, so we made corn whiskey To how coffee was at first banned in Muslim society and called black wine till they figured that it caused a different state of mind than actual alcohol To the use of tea as a way to stay hydrated in England, the city was packed full and the water was not the cleanest Once coffee arrived in England, there were coffee houses for men only because they were a place to smoke and talk politics while drinking coffee Women in England had tea gardens, nice gardens where they could walk, talk or sit and drink tea The book wrapped up in the time of just after WWII, granting Coca Cola responsible as the first company ...


  6. says:

    An interesting way of breaking history up by beer, wine, whiskey, coffee, tea, cola Each came into its own in our history may well have driven it in some ways The basic idea along with a thumbnail of each is laid out in the introduction pretty well Well enough that I didn t want to continue listening after about half the first section on beer I didn t care much for the narrator that wasn t helped by repetitious writing This would probably be a great book to read, though.It s doubtful,...


  7. says:

    Excellent book about 6 drinks beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea and Cola that impacted live of mankind through different ages.


  8. says:

    It is funny how we prefer certain aspects of books Another review here enjoyed the non alcoholic drinks better than the alcoholic drinks due to the amount of history and economics it covered, but I found the alcohol drinks to be far interesting, in depth, and entertaining Overall, I lik...


  9. says:

    I seem to be in a phase where I like books that show me the hidden life of the everyday things all around us, especially food and drink A few years ago I read Heat An Amateur s Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta Maker, and Apprentice to a Dante Quoting Butcher in Tuscany , by Bill Buford, which started me on this quest, which was followed by several books, including The Omnivore s Dilemma , by Michael Pollan Most recently I read The Search for God and Guinness , by Stephen Mansfield.Now, I ve finished A History of the World in 6 Glasses , by Tom Standage, which connects the span of human history to 6 different beverages that affected history culturally, politically, anthropologically, nutritionally, and economically The six, in rough order of their era of greatest influence, are beer, wine, whiskey, coffee, tea, and cola More broadly, you could have called the book A History of the World in Two Brain Altering Chemicals Alcohol and Caffeine It is a fascinating look at how these drinks sometimes have been responsible for pivotal moments in history, causing one civilization to rise and another to fall While human affairs are much complicated than one factor can exp...


  10. says:

    23 Feb 2015 I read this book since my son recommended it to me, while he was reading it for his World History AP class this year I see why he liked it and I generally did too It is fun and breezy and covers some fascinating ground that is indeed important, and grossly undercovered in most books or courses in history.However, the book is a bit presumptuous in stating it is a History of the World or that the six drinks have defined humankind s past Neither statement is totally true, except in a very loose way, but that should not stop one from reading it.While refreshingly open to an objective view of history regarding capitalism, free markets and property rights, than many most history books, the author still promoted some completely foolish ideas by giving them equal or time vs sound ideas and facts.The author needs to explore the idea that all these beverages are were, in effect, private, not public or government created or owned His epilogue could have been far informed and informative on the subject of the modern situation of water issues If he had explo...


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