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Remaking Society [Reading] ➸ Remaking Society By Murray Bookchin – Thomashillier.co.uk Remaking Society by Murray Bookchin Goodreads uotes from Remaking Society “Whatever has turned human beings into “aliens” in nature are social changes that have made many human beings “aliens Remaking Society by Murray Bookchin Goodreads uotes from Remaking Society “Whatever has turned human beings into “aliens” in nature are social changes that have made many human beings “aliens” in their own social world the domination of the young by the old of women by men and of men by men fr Remaking Society Bookchin Murray Livres Not Retrouvez Remaking Society et des millions de livres en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion Remaking Society Pathways to a Green Future by A Text to speech audiobook version of Murray Bookchin's Remaking Society Pathways to a Green FutureText to Speech conversion by Abbie ArcherNote The TTS Remaking Society Pathways to a Green Future Remaking Society Murray Bookchin out of stars Paperback Temporarily out of stock Next Customers who bought this item also bought Page of Start over Page of This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading Remaking Society | The Anarchist Library I had long thought of writing a compact book that would dearly summarize my views on “Remaking Society” from an ecological view” point It seemed to me as it did to many of my friends that a need existed to bring the ideas I have developed over several large books into a work of some two hundred pages; one that would not be too demanding for intelligent readers who are interested in Remaking Society by Murray Bookchin Goodreads uotes from Remaking Society “Whatever has turned human beings into “aliens” in nature are social changes that have made many human beings “aliens” in their own social world the domination of the young by the old of women by men and of men by men fr Remaking Society Bookchin Murray Livres Not Retrouvez Remaking Society et des millions de livres en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion Remaking Society Pathways to a Green Future by A Text to speech audiobook version of Murray Bookchin's Remaking Society Pathways to a Green FutureText to Speech conversion by Abbie ArcherNote The TTS Remaking Society | The Anarchist Library I had long thought of writing a compact book that would dearly summarize my views on “Remaking Society” from an ecological view” point It seemed to me as it did to many of my friends that a need existed to bring the ideas I have developed over several large books into a work of some two hundred pages; one that would not be too demanding for intelligent readers who are interested in Remaking Society Pathways to a Green Future Remaking Society Murray Bookchin out of stars Paperback Temporarily out of stock Next Customers who bought this item also bought Page of Start over Page of This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading.

  • Paperback
  • 208 pages
  • Remaking Society
  • Murray Bookchin
  • English
  • 13 May 2014
  • 9780921689027

About the Author: Murray Bookchin

Murray Bookchin was an American libertarian socialist author orator and philosopher A pioneer in the ecology movement Bookchin was the founder of the social ecology movement within anarchist libertarian socialist and ecological thought He was the author of two dozen books on politics philosophy history and urban affairs as well as ecology In the late s he became disenchanted with the.



10 thoughts on “Remaking Society

  1. Kenghis Khan Kenghis Khan says:

    First of all sorry for the no picture I couldn't find one off the web to steal and the bookcover was taken off the library edition I read so taking my own photograph would've been pointlessThis book basically is a summary of stuff Bookchin has said elsewhere in perhaps a slightly accessible if vaguer form Thus the sparce referencing of his historical and archaelogical claims eg that gerontocracy was the first hierarchy are annoying While not exactly forgivable this omission is at least understandable Less defensible is Bookchin's repeated invocation of Scala Natura This refers to a hierchy of being expounded first by Thomas Auinas and modified subseuently that basically says there has been a dynamic and over morally important unfolding from basic amoebas all the way through echinodemers to humans The idea is specious and biologically misleading For instance the pinus genome is considered innumerably complex than the human genome and to claim that mammals are complex than for instance birds is a dubious supposition Bookchin's damning and scathing critiue of Deep Ecology and other mystical element s of the environmental movement are valid but repetitive to the point of seriously compromising the integrity of this work To be fair at the onset he states that his goal is to demonstrate how the rape of our natural environment is rooted in the oppression of man by man Hence the misanthropomism of the touchy feely organic joggers is unfounded The point is well taken Yet one often gets the distinct sense that Bookchin is far suspicious and disdainful of the mindless activists and spiritual ecologists than he is of the industrial conglomerates and our capitalist rulers This fixation on what are at the end of the day unwelcome but certainly not mortal tendencies within the libertarian environmentalist movement makes one wonder just how in touch Bookchin is with the consumerist right and the herd mentality that form a much graver threat to the Enlightened society he espouses The conjunction of the book being little than a rather curt summary of ideas expounded in for example Post Scarcity Anarchism and his insistance on the mortal danger of the tree hugging apolitical neo pagan Environmentalists also pointed out in for example Re Enchanting Humanity A Defense of the Human Spirit against Antihumanism Mysticism and Primitivism conjoined with his cursorial and at times histrionic treatment of anthropology history and biologhy make for an admittedly dull reading Still those seeking a concise introduction to what the dude's been up to might get something out of it

  2. Alex McArthur Alex McArthur says:

    Meh

  3. Lori Lori says:

    capitalism completely incarnates Bakunin's notion of evil without the ualification that it is socially necessary Beyond the capitalist system there are no further turning points in history Capitalism marks the end of the road for a long social development in which evil permeated the good and irrationality permeated the rational Capitalism in effect constitutes the point of absolute negativity for society and the natural world One cannot improve this social order reform it or remake it on its own terms with an ecological prefix such as eco capitalism The only choice on has is to destroy it for it embodies every social disease — from patriarchal values class exploitation and statism to avarice militarism and now growth for the sake of growth — that has afflicted civilization and tainted all its great advances p 94 Essentially this book is a synthesis of Murray Bookchin's work up until that point 1989 It contains a cliff notes version of The Ecology of Freedom The Emergence and Dissolution of Hierarchy1 A history of the rise of the city in history and bourgeois society's negative effect on cities 2 A rather uniue elaboration on the complementarity between feminism and social ecology 3—in all other works there is only a short one sentence urging the reader to look into feminist and other liberatory work And an early version of the political project known as libertarian municipalism All tied together in Murray's typical anti capitalism and disdain for authoritarian movements and their uncompromising incompatibility with ecological thought 4 All in all it is a complete shame that this book is so rare because it would serve as an excellent introduction to Murray Bookchin's work1 p 45Domination of human by human did not arise because people created a socially oppressive mechanism — be it Marx's class structures or Lewis Mumford's human constructed mega machine — in order to Free themselves from the domination by nature It is exactly this very ueasy idea that gave rise to the myth that the domination of nature reuires presupposes or involves the domination of human by human2 p 93Competition began to permeate every level of society not only to throw capitalist against capitalist for control of the marketplace It pitter buyer against seller need against greed and individual against individual on the most elementary levels of human encounters In the marketplace one individual faced another with a snarl even as working people each seeking as a matter of sheer survival to get the better of the other No amount of moralizing and pietizing can alter the fact that rivalry at the most molecular base of society is a bourgeois law of life in the literal sense of the word life Accumulation to undermine buy out or otherwise absorb or outwit a competitor is a condition for existence in a capitalist economic order3In a broad sense social ecology and early feminism directly challenged the economistic emphasis Marxism had placed on social analysis and reconstruction It rendered the New Left's anti authoritarian outlook explicit and clearly definable by singling out hierarchical domination not simply anti authoriatrian oppression Woman's degraded status as a gender and status group was rendered clearly visible against the background of her seeming euality in a world guided by justice's ineuality of euals At a time when the New Left was decomposing into Marxist sects and the counterculture was being transformed into a new form of boutiue retailing social ecology and feminism were expanding the ideal of freedom beyond any bounds that had been established in recent memory Hierarchy as such — be it in the form of ways of thinking basic human relationships social relations and society's interaction with nature — could now be disentangled from the traditional nexus of class analyses that concealed it under a carpet of economic interpretations of society History could now be examined in terms of general interests such as freedom solidarity and empathy for one's own kind; indeed the need to be an active part of the balance of natureThese interests we no longer specific to a particular class gender race or nationality They were universal interests that were share by by humanity as a whole Not that economic problems and class conflicts could be ignored but to confine oneself to them left a vast residue of perverted sensibilities and relationships that had to be confronted and corrected on a broader social horizonIn terms that were expansive than any that had been formulated in the sixties or earlier the revolutionary project could now be clearly defined as the abolition of hierarchy the reharmonization of humanity with nature through the reharmonization of human with human the achievement of an ecological society structured on ecologically sound technologies and face to face democratic communities Feminism made it possible to highlight the significance of hierarchy in a very existential form Drawing heavily from literature and the language of social ecology it rendered hierarchy concrete visible and poignantly real owing to the status of women in all classes occupations social institutions and familial relationships As long as it revealed the demeaned human condition that all people suffered particularly women it demystified subtle forms of rule that existed in the bedroom kitchen playground and school — not only in the workplace and the public sphere generally Hence social ecology and feminism logically intertwined with each other and complemented each other in a shared process of demystification They exposed a demonic incubus that had perverted every advance of civilization with the poison of hierarchy and domination An agenda even larger than that advanced by the early New Left and counterculture had been created by the mid sixties; one that reuired elaboration education activity and serious organization to reach people as a whole not merely a particular sector of the population4 p 160The denaturing of the environment must always be seen as inherent to capitalism the product of its very law of life as a system of limitless expansion and capital accumulation To ignore the anti ecological core of the present social order — be it in its Western corporate form or its Eastern bureaucratic form — is to allay public concern about the depth of the crisis and lasting means to resolve itEnvironmentalism conceived as a piecemeal reform movement easily lends itself to the lure of statecraft that is to participation in electoral parliamentary and party oriented activities It reuires no great change in consciousness to turn a lobby into a party or a petitioner into a parliamentarian Between a person who humbly solicits from power and another who arrogantly exercises it there exists a sinister and degenerative symbiosis Both share the same mentality that change can be achieved only through the exercise of power specifically through the power of a self corrupting professionalized corps of legislators bureaucrats and military forces called the State The appeal to this power invariably legitimates and strengthens the State with the result that it actually disempowers the people Power allows for no vacuum in public life Whatever power the State gains it always does so at the expense of popular power Conversely whatever power the people gain they always acuire at the expense of the State To legitimate State power in effect is to delegitimate popular power

  4. Tom Tom says:

    More readable than his book Ecology of Freedom He suggests that the contemporary ecological crisis a topic Bookchin had begun to write on back in the early '60s has the potential for a trans class social movement to transform society If the common human interests were clear it would be hard to explain the resistance of the elite to recognizing that capitalism is at the root of the problem as Naomi Klein has argued in her recent book This Changes Everything This is especially true of the oil coal corporations but others in the establishment as wellBookchin provides an over view of radical movements ideas such as the social movements and the New Left of the '60s and earlier working class based socialist movements which he calls proletarian socialism Bookchin rejects Marxism in its entirety which he tends to interpret as highly economistic and deterministic Marx's theory of history has been interpreted that way by some but there are others who interpret it in a non determinist fashion And Bookchin doesn't acknowledge these nuances Bookchin believes that the era of working class radical insurgencies proletarian socialism is permanently a thing of the past His argument is that workers in the early 20th century were attracted to ideas of worker control and socialism because there was still a living memmory of when working people controlled their own work as farmers or self employed artisans The irony is this argument suffers the same defect of economism and excessive determinism that he criticizes Marxism forReaders are likely to find his discussion of ecology in the later chapters relevant to present day concerns His discussion of use of majority vote in assemblies and systems of delegation and federation among communities as a way to run society communally and democratically has a certain plausibilityand this is the aspect of his thought that apparently influenced the current radical Kurdish movement in Turkey Syria

  5. Lara Messersmith-Glavin Lara Messersmith-Glavin says:

    I originally read this in college but lately have returned to Bookchin's writings for a number of reasons; one his recent death and the impact that has had on my husband who studied with Murray at the Institute for Social Ecology; two a reinvigoration of my sense of urgency regarding ecological matters; and three a desperate need to find a way to offer answers rather than anger and simply uestions when confronted with the way things are There are many things in this book to love Currently I am struggling to make it to those points as I got mired in the first chapter and grew angry and impatient with what I took to be a gross oversimplification of the development of hierarchy and the nature of pre capitalist social organization cross culturally I'll finish this review once I've returned to the thick of things the summaries of the social ecological principles that guide so many of us in spirit if not in explicit paths to liberation

  6. d d says:

    In this work Bookchin summarizes and introduces his classics Post Scarcity Anarchism Ecology of Freedom Rise of Urbanization and others Unfortunately he has lost the extremely playful utopian tone of the earlier works As a result he gets far too caught up in an overly hostile though valid critiue of competing tendencies such as deep ecology and primitivismIf you want a good introduction to Bookchin’s thought I recommend starting instead with his short articles most of which are available for free online Some of them are collected in The Murray Bookchin Reader Don’t get too caught up in his critiues—as important as they are—before recognizing his utterly creative and still relevant contributions to ecological and utopian thoughtRead instead “Toward an Ecological Society” “What Is Social Ecology” “The New Municipal Agenda”

  7. Quentin Quentin says:

    A simple readable book on anarchism and ecology by one of the great 20th century thinkers on both subjects I really appreciate Bookchin's synthesis of anthropology history and humanistic ethics as he built a case for an ecologically and socially free society not simply a just one he makes a distinction between these concepts Some of the conclusions I found sort of truncated and partial but overall his commitment to action and human engagement as political ends unto themselves was a breath of fresh air when so much of our political discourse is all about thinking our way through problems

  8. Lynne Lynne says:

    Definitely dry but interesting This is the first thing I've read that delves into social ecology and I'm really interested in reading especially something current I liked the critiues of Marxism and eco feminism too

  9. Devon Giguere Devon Giguere says:

    Good introduction but not a lot of citations where there should be citations and it's of an introduction than an in depth work I rather have spent the time reading another one of his works instead of reading this

  10. Katie Behrendt Katie Behrendt says:

    Excellent critiue of Marxism Also really liked the part about the emergence of hierarchy in society A lot of really good points even though he is a bit of a curmudgeon and has some pretty strong feelings about mysticism

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