[Epub] ↠ Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language Author Gretchen McCulloch – Thomashillier.co.uk


Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language A Linguistically Informed Look At How Our Digital World Is Transforming The English Language Language Is Humanity S Most Spectacular Open Source Project, And The Internet Is Making Our Language Change Faster And In Interesting Ways Than Ever Before Internet Conversations Are Structured By The Shape Of Our Apps And Platforms, From The Grammar Of Status Updates To The Protocols Of Comments And Replies Linguistically Inventive Online Communities Spread New Slang And Jargon With Dizzying Speed What S , Social Media Is A Vast Laboratory Of Unedited, Unfiltered Words Where We Can Watch Language Evolve In Real TimeEven The Most Absurd Looking Slang Has Genuine Patterns Behind It Internet Linguist Gretchen McCulloch Explores The Deep Forces That Shape Human Language And Influence The Way We Communicate With One Another She Explains How Your First Social Internet Experience Influences Whether You Prefer LOL Or Lol, Why Sparkly Tildes Succeeded Where Centuries Of Proposals For Irony Punctuation Had Failed, What Emoji Have In Common With Physical Gestures, And How The Artfully Disarrayed Language Of Animal Memes Like Lolcats And Doggo Made Them Likely To SpreadBecause Internet Is Essential Reading For Anyone Who S Ever Puzzled Over How To Punctuate A Text Message Or Wondered Where Memes Come From It S The Perfect Book For Understanding How The Internet Is Changing The English Language, Why That S A Good Thing, And What Our Online Interactions Reveal About Who We Are


10 thoughts on “Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language

  1. says:

    Language developed very slow, ugh, ah, and is accelerating faster and faster Hm, everything seems to do this nowadays Take all those funny ancient, medieval, renaissance texts and how entertainingly cute they wrote, talked, and grammared, isn t it lovely For a very long time the control over punctuation, grammar, spelling, was in the hand of the few ever so smart intellectuals that decided what was right and wrong, what a correct standard is and what an evil, wrong, stinking, different approa Language developed very slow, ugh, ah, and is accelerating faster and faster Hm, everything seems to do this nowadays Take all those funny ancient, medieval, renaissance texts and how entertainingly cute they wrote, talked, and grammared, isn t it lovely For a very long time the control over punctuation, grammar, spelling, was in the hand of the few ever so smart intellectuals that decided what was right and wrong, what a correct standard is and what an evil, wrong, stinking, different approach This lead to bizarre overcomplications, reforms that got reformed and so many unnecessary overachiever brain wars that wanted one right language and not an intelligent compromise like, let s say, for instance, different alternatives to write something as long as the logic and intelligibility don t suffer But then the specialist would have had no jobs any, so the senseless learning for millions of kids continued And then, bang, internet Not that the poor young ones didn t have to learn stupid, illogical rules any I mean, what do they believe language is, math, physics or something , but now language could start evolving quicker, freer, andmanifold than ever before, with each subgroup, culture, special interest, and it keeps accelerating, bazinga This fascinating concept, how language is changing and will develop in the future thanks to interconnecting anyone with all human beings and their knowledge and unique speech, use of language and speaking and writing style, is the main idea of McCullochs revolutionary work Yes, I know, there are emojis, memes, hashtags, emoticons, much viral stuff that will continue forever, but I find the transformation of the way people directly interact with each other in social media, chats, comments, VR, AR, and in some rare cases, real life, muchfascinating than and grumpy cat Sorry for that, but neologisms, new slangs, diminutives, and jargon and how they collide with and change the old language, as the digital natives keep using new grammar when they become parents themselves and the before mentioned, is muchfascinating than pics and evolving smileys I have a certain mentality regarding emojis and I will stay with it, saying I ll tip and tap them With my cold, dead hands But not before It s all a bit of emancipation too, because, do you know what, in my subjective opinion, is the ultimate proof of conservative stupidity Having tens of thousands of linguists in universities all around the world that play with the rules of languages and boring, useless studies about stuff nobody is interested in while important, new, interdisciplinary, progressive fields get no funding for research in this unbelievable revolution of everything regarding human interaction since the internet began What right and legitimation have all those anachronism custodians to cherrypick and dictate how language has to evolve, when a reform is necessary, and how one has to do grammar, yada, blah blah, and babble The language is free, wooden girls and boys, chill a bit, open your mind forlevity in language and ethical and cultural references But luckily internet linguistics is starting to take off and will analyse a parallel evolution of real and digital language, how stronger languages are cannibalizing others those poor little ones like German that suffer so much with each anglicism killing one of their old friends, oh look, now it cries and one has to always keep in mind that we will seem as strange to future people as medieval knights and Victorian ladies seem to us today Regarding emojis I asked myself how the biochemical and neurological effect of it will develop if VR and AR are used by kids in some years and they are conditioned to use animations and pictures of mimic, gestures, and body language that are written into their wetware and give conversations and thoughts an extra lawyer, linking different brain regions together and, sigh, being quite useful for human evolution But not before And I still won t use them, ok See, an oldfashioned interrogation and exclamation mark, that s enough emo for me And I lold and rofld when the author was talking about a third place to socialize next to work and home, if my math is right, I am still at 0, socialize my What amazed me the most is realizing that this living, breathing, immortal thing called language is at the moment creating new generations of language users, that this love affair between tech and blah will last forever and create exponentiallyanddifferent manifestations, that McCulloch already defined different phases and varieties of users, that I am one of the ancient ones and finally realized that I am getting old.A wiki walk can be as refreshing to the mind as a walk through nature in this completely overrated real life outside books


  2. says:

    But what I really want is a book that explain s why nobody know s how to use apostrophe s any


  3. says:

    I find the evolution of languages fascinating so as soon as I saw the cover title of this book, I knew it was one I d enjoy The author Gretchen McCulloch is a linguist who studies internet language In this book she shows us how English has transformed since and because of the internet She explores memes, hashtags, emoticons, and emojis, showing how we use them in place of gestures and facial expressions in our written online language Indeed, we communicate so much through non verbal meth I find the evolution of languages fascinating so as soon as I saw the cover title of this book, I knew it was one I d enjoy The author Gretchen McCulloch is a linguist who studies internet language In this book she shows us how English has transformed since and because of the internet She explores memes, hashtags, emoticons, and emojis, showing how we use them in place of gestures and facial expressions in our written online language Indeed, we communicate so much through non verbal methods that our online language can be easily misinterpreted without it With the use of emojis and GIFs, we can better communicate our intent Another way we enhance our digital communication is through selective punctuation I had no idea that using punctuation in texts is seen by young people as passive aggressive using a period at the end of a text, for instance, indicates annoyance What It made me feel a little less ancient that I at some point began using the ellipsis to indicate something left unsaid and not as a line break as we did in antediluvian days Another way written language has evolved for me is in the use of the word dear as a greeting For those of you too young to remember, back in the day we would begin all correspondence with Dear So and So For everyone, whether we personally knew them or not Now it makes me uncomfortable when I receive an email from someone I don t know and they address me as Dear Ugh, shudder, no, no, no That just isn t right I never noticed these changes taking place and only became aware of them through this book It is exciting to see how my own writing has changed with the internet not capital I Internet and where I am still clinging to formal written language I will confess that at times I am a grammar snob Incorrect spellings, grammar, and punctuation drive me batty It is different if I know the writer s mother tongue is not English then it is understandable I have to remind myself that language has always changed and that s ok Okay if it didn t, we would all still be babbling whatever syllables the first humans uttered As Ms McCulloch says, The changeability of language is its strength This book reminds me that language is in constant flux that is its nature Anything that is alive changes Still, I don t know if I will ever accept the spelling of alot instead of a lot or the now common use of double negatives in English Am I just old I am what Ms McCulloch describes as an Old Internet Person, meaning one who began using the internet prior to the end of the 90s, not necessarily an old person though of course our definition of old changes as we age I no longer think of people as old until they re in their 80s, whereas in my 20s I would have thought my now 44 year old self to be an antique relic of the distant past It was fun to reminisce with the author about such things as printing out emails, ICQ, listservs, and especially those chain emails er, e mails of jokes ring a bell for anyone else Those we would ALWAYS print out so we could share them with everyone who wasn t on the internet which comprised just about everyone we knew in the real world Ms McCulloch describes four waves of internet people, showing how our online language was shaped by when we began socializing online it does not necessarily denote one s age Usenet, forums, IRC, BBS, listservs these are the Old Internet people AIM, MSN Messenger, blogs, LiveJournal, MySpace Facebook, Twitter, GChat, YouTube Instagram, Snapchat, iMessage, WhatsAppIt s interesting to note that some of us have kept the styles we first began using, and others of us have evolved with the times I would put myself in the middle In many ways I have changed but, as noted above, there are things that I adamant about not changing.This book is fascinating although I did find it to be lacking in areas as well I would have enjoyed learningabout the new words that have entered English because of the internet, and especially to see how communicating with those who speak other languages has enriched English with foreign words All in all, a fun and interesting read for anyone who s interested in seeing our evolving ways of communicating with each other My apologies to any octogenarians who read this and are offended that I think you re old Check back with me in another 10 years and I m sure I ll have moved my definition of old up another decade


  4. says:

    The first book I ve ever felt was written for ME an Internet kid of a particular micro generation, interested in examining my online life with as much respect and rigor as we apply to traditional literature and academic studies I LOVED this book I ll be buying copies for my dad, my little sister, and people of many ages in between.


  5. says:

    Interesting analysis of how we speak and type on the internet, in terms of social and often age groupings and the different meanings applied It is absolutely fascinating how we ve collectively managed to develop a written language that conveys tone as in meaning for pretty much the first time in the history of language, even if the ways of doing it could be considered a bit special How much you enjoy this will depend on your appetite for linguistic nerdery I wasn t that interested in the Interesting analysis of how we speak and type on the internet, in terms of social and often age groupings and the different meanings applied It is absolutely fascinating how we ve collectively managed to develop a written language that conveys tone as in meaning for pretty much the first time in the history of language, even if the ways of doing it could be considered a bit special How much you enjoy this will depend on your appetite for linguistic nerdery I wasn t that interested in the discussion of the tribes I d have likedbreakdown of the specifics there s lots on sarcasm tildes, but I want analysis of eg Spongebob rAndOm CaPiTaLs or the deliberate omission of question marks in remarks such as why are you like this I should chase up the author s blog, clearly


  6. says:

    I was so excited to finally get this audiobook on loan from my library I felt like I d been waiting for months, which of course is a great sign I love linguistics and this is a popular book, so I was expecting a good solid read.Well, it s a weird book Informative, yes, but also weird.It s weird because McCulloch uses words like wonderfully and innovative to praise EVERY SINGLE CHANGE that has been made to communication in The Internet Age Fine, I m all for progress and optimism too, but I was so excited to finally get this audiobook on loan from my library I felt like I d been waiting for months, which of course is a great sign I love linguistics and this is a popular book, so I was expecting a good solid read.Well, it s a weird book Informative, yes, but also weird.It s weird because McCulloch uses words like wonderfully and innovative to praise EVERY SINGLE CHANGE that has been made to communication in The Internet Age Fine, I m all for progress and optimism too, but her firm Everything Is Awesome stance sounded far too enthusiastic It was almost like she was trying to convince herself while she was convincing us that emoticons, abbreviations, alternate spellings and adopted lingo are all absolutely an enhancement to our culture and communication, no matter what they add She only talks about how great this evolution must be, and leaves no room for the ways some of these changes might not be so wonderful IMHO, it s not a full examination if all sides are not explored.It s also weird because the audio version is read by the author, which is rarely a good thing and this case fits the rule McCulloch reads the book at breakneck speed, while adding a dash of smugness Seriously, I stopped my Overdrive app multiple times just to ensure the speed was still on 1x Perhaps this is why a lot of Audible and Overdrive reviewers are stating they need to revisit this book later I did learn a bit from this book, but I couldn t finish because I dreaded coming back to that voice I might see if the eBook is available through Overdrive, just to finish it out


  7. says:

    In brief A linguist looks at the ways the internet has changed English, with digressions into internet culture as a whole.Full disclosure This was a reading copy which I received through work, with the expectation that I would like it enough to review it and then order it for stock This book is out July 23, 2019.Thoughts This was a really interesting read, containing a lot of stuff I knew without knowing and also stuff I hadn t thought about It s also a good, well structured introduction to In brief A linguist looks at the ways the internet has changed English, with digressions into internet culture as a whole.Full disclosure This was a reading copy which I received through work, with the expectation that I would like it enough to review it and then order it for stock This book is out July 23, 2019.Thoughts This was a really interesting read, containing a lot of stuff I knew without knowing and also stuff I hadn t thought about It s also a good, well structured introduction to linguistics and specifically sociolinguistics not as in depth as a textbook would be, but with compressed versions of the core ideas in accessible, modern language I liked that McCulloch makes a point to not only lay out her reasoning as to why she focused on some linguistic features over others, but also to cite originators of memes and slang when possible.As for the contents, they re a little hard to sum up simply because there s a lot of stuff covered The evolution of internet culture and generational profiles of its users The semantic uses of gifs and emojis Twitter and Facebook as research tools Minimalist Tumblr punctuation and the contentiousness of periods in texts The history of memes The informality of emails compared to letters Emphatic letter duplication Just for starters Like I said, I knew a lot of the content just from living on the internet for so long, but it was nice having it verbalized and the sociology I largely did not know and it was very cool.And while McCulloch doesn t cover everything the because noun phrase formation doesn t appear despite the title, for instance, and the spread of internet usages into spoken English is barely touched on a lot of those gaps are things you could do a dissertation on and internet linguistics is a pretty new field, so I have hopes for either a follow up or a book by somebody else She definitely leaves things open and encouraging to anyone wanting to follow her lead Doing linguistics research and stumped for ideas Hit me up I have thoughts So yeah, definitely a good book and very much written for me the internet goblin linguistics nerd Anyone who s interested in language, the internet, understanding what the heck is up with kids these days, and or the social history of our times should add this to their TBR.8 10To bear in mind Will challenge your ideas about language and the internet, unless you re a linguist already If you re already a linguist, will give you at least ten ideas for research papers Might also give you flashbacks to the 1990s, regardless of educational leanings


  8. says:

    I m surprised by how fascinating I found this I m a late adopter when it comes to technology I m still resisting a smartphone and I haven t given linguistics a thought since that one class I took in college, but it turns out that my proofreader s interest in the English language and my daily use of e mail and social media were enough to make it extremely relevant The Montreal linguist s thesis is that the Internet popularized informal writing and quickly incorporates changes in slang and cul I m surprised by how fascinating I found this I m a late adopter when it comes to technology I m still resisting a smartphone and I haven t given linguistics a thought since that one class I took in college, but it turns out that my proofreader s interest in the English language and my daily use of e mail and social media were enough to make it extremely relevant The Montreal linguist s thesis is that the Internet popularized informal writing and quickly incorporates changes in slang and cultural references At the same time, it still reflects regional and age specific differences in the way that people speak write conversationally.The book goes deep into topics you may never have considered, like how we convey tone of voice through what we type and how emoji function as the gestures of the written word You ll get a breakdown of current generations in terms of when the Internet became the default in their life I belong to what the author calls Semi Internet People I remember first using the Internet in a classroom in seventh grade, getting dial up AOL at home not long thereafter, and opening my own Hotmail account in high school , a history of lolcats, and musings on the metaphorical use of periods and capital letters If you are among the unconvinced, you ll also be schooled in the appeal of gifs and memes.Some trivia I picked up In 2015 the tears of joy emoji became the most popular emoji,used than the smiley face emoticon.For many of us the Internet serves as what sociologists call a third place besides home and work where we can socialize.Only 5 8% of Internet users are bloggers Subtweeting as in subliminal and vaguebooking are when you post about a situation without giving any specifics.Parents often refer to a child by an initial or nickname so the child won t have a searchable social media presence.The Library of Congress now archives memes The Lolcat Bible, Urban Dictionary, etcMcCulloch portrays language as a constantly changing network, such that terms like standard and correct no longer apply She writes with such geeky enthusiasm that you ll happily accompany her down any linguistic alley.Originally published on my blog, Bookish Beck


  9. says:

    What can I say nerdy books about language are my thing This was a really insightful analysis of how internet communications have evolved over time The highlights for me were her dissection of different generations of internet users e.g old internet vs full internet, etc , as well as the emoji chapter This is one of the books that ends up having a lot of descriptive power, and I appreciated how it made meaware of why I talk the way I do online


  10. says:

    I ended up being a little let down by this book Maybe it was just that I was expecting something different I was really hoping fortalk about current linguistics language from the internet It was heavily about the history of the internet, which definitely served a purpose and was necessary to understand the evolution of our language with the internet But there seemed to be little actual discussion on the interesting linguistic aspects of the internet andof a long history lesson T I ended up being a little let down by this book Maybe it was just that I was expecting something different I was really hoping fortalk about current linguistics language from the internet It was heavily about the history of the internet, which definitely served a purpose and was necessary to understand the evolution of our language with the internet But there seemed to be little actual discussion on the interesting linguistic aspects of the internet andof a long history lesson The author so many times made comments likeon memes in the next chapter and then never would really get to it in the following chapters I felt there were so many interesting aspects of internet language usage that were sorely missing When she used examples of current popular phrases or typography it was muchenjoyable that s what I really would have liked to seeof Things like in my feels I can t even tldr and memes I would have loved to hearexpansion but was givenof a hard to follow, scattered and sometimes boring lesson on odd things that didn t seem to do with anything I guess I am a little confused what the overarching purpose was I still enjoyed quite a bit, but had to skim a lot to find the pieces that interested me.I did learn some, and found certain parts really interesting and a few moments that made me chuckle She did a good job explaining the reasoning behind certain language constructs and how they came to be It was interesting to learn about Arabizi and the like The typographical tone of voice chapter was particularly interesting to me I guess I would have likedregarding internet culture Maybe it just wasn t what I was expecting


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *