Lapin Plays Possum: Trickster Tales From the Louisiana

Lapin Plays Possum: Trickster Tales From the Louisiana Bayou [KINDLE] ❅ Lapin Plays Possum: Trickster Tales From the Louisiana Bayou By Sharon Arms Doucet – Thomashillier.co.uk This series of trickster tales stemming from African folklore bears remarkable resemblance to the Deep South’s Brer Rabbit That’s because Compere Lapin is his kissing cousin In one form or another This series of Possum: Trickster Kindle × trickster tales stemming from African folklore bears remarkable resemblance to the Deep South’s Brer Rabbit That’s because Compere Lapin is his kissing cousin In one form or another Lapin and Compere Bouki have Lapin Plays PDF/EPUB or been harassing each other for than two centuries Doucet’s retelling of these popular stories is flavored with all the spice of a Cajun gumboCompere Lapin came into the world with nothing but a cypress splinter and he Plays Possum: Trickster Epub µ never misses an opportunity to talk himself out of work The only thing he does better is playing tricks on the large dim witted Bouki Whether he becomes a parrain three times in one day trading crops Plays Possum: Trickster Tales From PDF/EPUB or for roots and leaves or begging to be thrown into a fire Lapin always has something up his sleeve and Bouki is just gullible Plays Possum: Trickster Tales From PDF/EPUB or enough to believe it.


9 thoughts on “Lapin Plays Possum: Trickster Tales From the Louisiana Bayou

  1. (NS) Lauren (NS) Lauren says:

    GradeInterest Level 2 5This trickster tale collection includes three stories following the adventures of the the Lousiana Bayou trickster Lapin the Rabbit The author uses rich language filled with similes and humor to be enjoyed by advanced readers She also includes a glossary and punctuation guide for the French vocabulary used throughout the story An author's note at the end provides useful information about the African origin of this trickster character along with it's evolution into the Brer Rabbit tales told on the east coast This information could prompt a comparison study of all three with students


  2. Laura Laura says:

    Pictures are neat I just don't love the story of Briar Rabbit He is so mean I know that is silly


  3. James Govednik James Govednik says:

    This higher level picture book offers a Louisiana flavor of trickster tale complete with a glossary of FrenchCajunCreole terms that are used in the story Compere Lapin is here as the traditional trickster rabbit with dog like Compere Bouki losing out again and again Bouki means hyena in the Wolof language of Africa and here the character is a blend of hyena dog coyote and fox In the author's notes Doucet notes the long history of these characters from Africa and other details relevant to her versions of the three stories presented I enjoyed this fresh take for me on the trickster genre and the bayou setting was also enjoyable Some of the tales add some extra steps or layers in the plot which would help keep the interest of older readers The colorful illustrations inserted throughout the text enliven the story and add to the appeal for all ages For students familiar with the genre this book would be a useful opening to a renewed study they could be challenged to identify other source tales for the stories in this book and to discuss the author's choices in her versions included here


  4. Jean V. Naggar Literary Jean V. Naggar Literary says:

    “Pranks prevail on the bayouin these three lively folktalesColorful vocabulary and peppery idioms season each pageGlossary and notes round out this highly polished presentation” Publishers Weekly starred reviewFilled with sly hilarious regionalisms and spiced with bayou phrases this is a wonderful choice for enlivening folktale unitsA fine addition to folklore collections” Booklist“A valuable lagniappe” School Library Journal


  5. Jean V. Naggar Literary Jean V. Naggar Literary says:

    “Pranks prevail on the bayouin these three lively folktalesColorful vocabulary and peppery idioms season each pageGlossary and notes round out this highly polished presentation” Publishers Weekly starred review“Filled with sly hilarious regionalisms and spiced with bayou phrases this is a wonderful choice for enlivening folktale unitsA fine addition to folklore collections” Booklist“A valuable lagniappe” School Library Journal


  6. Pauline Pauline says:

    Interesting to see a glossary in the front of a children's book; I appreciated it because I was not familiar with the Cajun slangthat being said I'm not sure who this book is meant for The illustrations are gorgeous but the text is intense and may be too much for really young readers It's almost as if the three separate tales could have actually been three separate picture books SO while I love the idea of learning about a uniue culture this book was lost on me


  7. Betsy Betsy says:

    Great art and a text that is begging to be read aloud as long as you can pull off a Louisiana acccent Great for 2nd grade and up and experienced younger listeners


  8. Meg Meg says:

    Gorgeous illustrations pretty familiar trickster type tales


  9. Nux Nux says:

    Pictures are awesome Only thing is I feel too bad for gullible Bouki and Lapin's not smart he's just mean and lucky


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