Visions and Revisions PDF Þ Visions and Epub /


Visions and Revisions [Epub] ➢ Visions and Revisions ➣ John Cowper Powys – Thomashillier.co.uk Powys presents a set of literary devotions of great figures in Literature who have obsessed him He attempts not so much a reasoned critique or any attempt to categorise these figures but rather, as he Powys presents a set of literary devotions of great figures in Literature who have obsessed him He attempts not so much a reasoned critique or any attempt to categorise these figures but rather, as he describes in the Preface to give himself up, absolutely and completely, to the various visions and temperaments of these great dead artists Powys delivered popular lectures throughout the United States and was able to hold audiences in Visions and Epub / rapt attention for hours while speaking about great literature and writers, this book from the earlier part of his writing career gives us a little glimpse into what those lectures must have been like.


10 thoughts on “Visions and Revisions

  1. Richard S Richard S says:

    While known mostly for his novels, John Cowper Powys JCP wrote a number of books on other subjects Visions and Revisions is a collection of essays on great writers and one painter, El Greco that JCP wrote early in his career personally I view it as the first of his great works Prior to writing books he was a popular lecturer in England and the United States on literary topics, and I suspect that this book was based on those lectures It has certain structural similarities to Pater s Rena While known mostly for his novels, John Cowper Powys JCP wrote a number of books on other subjects Visions and Revisions is a collection of essays on great writers and one painter, El Greco that JCP wrote early in his career personally I view it as the first of his great works Prior to writing books he was a popular lecturer in England and the United States on literary topics, and I suspect that this book was based on those lectures It has certain structural similarities to Pater s Renaissance , and while not quite a work at that level of supreme genius, it certainly isapproachable and readable.But to get to the book Visions and Revisions is in a word wonderful As he treats each writer, JCP sometimes misses, butoften he hits, and sometimes when he hits he is incredibly profound Of the essays, the ones on Shakespeare, El Greco, Milton, Dickens, Shelley, Keats, Dostoevsky, Poe and Whitman are exceptional His enthusiasm is infectious Some examples On Keats But what poetry has he left behind him There is nothing like it in the world, Nothing like it, for sheer, deadly, draining, madding, drowsing witchery of beauty It is the very cup of Circe the very philtre of Sun poison On Dickens The world of Dickens fantastic creations is all the nearer to the truth of our life because it is so arbitrary and impossible He seems to go backwards and forwards with a torch, throwing knobs, jabs, wrinkles, corrugations, protuberances, cavities, horns, and snouts into terrifying illumination Be we are like that That is what we actually are On Whitman I wonder if critics have done justice to the incredible genius of this man who can find words for that aching of the soul we do not confess even to our dearest The sudden words he makes use of, in certain connections, awe us, hush us, confound us, take our breathwith their mysterious congruity Has my reader ever read the little poem called Tears And what purity in the truest, deepest sense, lies behind his pity for such tragic craving his understanding of what love stricken, banished ones feel Powys is not an academic We read far too many works by academics about the great writers, and not enough books by their enthusiasts In fact his essays read like the best Goodreads reviews you ve ever read At a time when so much written about great literature is through a filter of isms, finding a book utterly without any sort of overarching thesis to prove is incredibly refreshing Reading JCP s Visions and Revisions is a true joy, I ve never read a book that made me want to readIf any of you are sick of reading, run out of books, or feel like taking a new or another look at some of the great literature of the past again with a fresh and excited eye, Visions and Revisions gets my strongest recommendation Find an old copy for yourself or a book loving friend, or find it on line, it will send you down all sorts of wonderful reading paths


  2. Mike Mike says:

    Favorite parts Preface, and the review of Rabelais.18 19..everything becomes a sacrament to regard each day as a last day this is to live in the spirit of the grand stylegrow conscious of those moods and events which are permanent and human, vs those which are transitory and unimportant we want the eternal appeal.25 Rabelais gives us courage wine is a sign to us generous and sane intoxication28 this laughing and generous sage30. excrement everything in life Favorite parts Preface, and the review of Rabelais.18 19..everything becomes a sacrament to regard each day as a last day this is to live in the spirit of the grand stylegrow conscious of those moods and events which are permanent and human, vs those which are transitory and unimportant we want the eternal appeal.25 Rabelais gives us courage wine is a sign to us generous and sane intoxication28 this laughing and generous sage30. excrement everything in life is serious and everything is a huge jestFrom The Writer s Almanac program Oscar Wilde wrote, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure It is exquisite, and leaves one unsatisfied Whatcould one want On this day in 2004, the Republic of Ireland became the first country to completely ban cigarette smoking from the workplace Great Britain soon followed, instituting a ban to be phased in gradually over the next four years, which prompted author and columnist A.N Wilson to remark in the Telegraph Sitting with my drink in such now empty bars, my mind has turned to the great smokers of the past to C.S Lewis, who smoked 60 cigarettes a day between pipes with his friends Charles Williams cigarette smoker and Tolkien pipe smoker to Thomas Carlyle, whose wife made him smoke in the kitchen of their house in Cheyne Row, but who is unimaginable without tobacco, to Robert Browning, who quickly adapted to the new cigarette craze, to the great John Cowper Powys, who continued to smoke cigarettes, and to produce fascinating novels, into his nineties This attack on basic liberty, which was allowed through without any significant protest, might mark the end not merely of smoking, but of literature


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