Walking in Berlin: A Flaneur in the Capital ePUB ì in


Walking in Berlin: A Flaneur in the Capital [Reading] ➷ Walking in Berlin: A Flaneur in the Capital By Franz Hessel – Thomashillier.co.uk The first English translation of a lost classic that reinvents the flaneur in BerlinFranz Hessel , a German born writer, grew up in Berlin, studied in Munich, and then lived in Paris, where he moved The first Berlin: A PDF ↠ English translation of a lost classic that reinvents the flaneur in BerlinFranz Hessel , a German born writer, grew up in Berlin, Walking in PDF/EPUB ² studied in Munich, and then lived in Paris, where he moved in artistic and literary circles His relationship with the fashion journalist Helen Grund was in Berlin: A eBook ¸ the inspiration for Henri Pierre Roche s novel Jules et Jim made into a celebratedfilm by Francois Truffaut In collaboration with Walter Benjamin, Hessel reinvented the Parisian figure of the flaneur Thisbook here in its first English translation offers Hessel s version of a flaneur in BerlinIn Walking in Berlin, Hessel captures the rhythm of Weimar era Berlin, recording the seismic shifts in German culture Nearly all of the essays take the form of a walk or outing, focusing on either a theme or part of the city, and many end at a theater, cinema, or club Hessel deftly weaves the past with the present, walking through the city s history as well as its neighborhoods Even today, his walks in the city, from the Alexanderplatz to Kreuzberg, can guide would be flaneursWalking in Berlin is a lost classic, known mainly because of Hessel s connection to Benjamin but now introduced to readers of English Walking in Berlin was a central model for Benjamin s Arcades Project and remains a classic of walking literature that ranges from Surrealist perambulation to Situationist psychogeography This MIT Press edition includes the complete text in translation as well as Benjamin s essay on Walking in Berlin, originally written as a review of the book s original edition.

    Walking in Berlin: A Flaneur in the Capital ePUB ì in the Parisian figure of the flaneur Thisbook here in its first English translation offers Hessel s version of a flaneur in BerlinIn Walking in Berlin, Hessel captures the rhythm of Weimar era Berlin, recording the seismic shifts in German culture Nearly all of the essays take the form of a walk or outing, focusing on either a theme or part of the city, and many end at a theater, cinema, or club Hessel deftly weaves the past with the present, walking through the city s history as well as its neighborhoods Even today, his walks in the city, from the Alexanderplatz to Kreuzberg, can guide would be flaneursWalking in Berlin is a lost classic, known mainly because of Hessel s connection to Benjamin but now introduced to readers of English Walking in Berlin was a central model for Benjamin s Arcades Project and remains a classic of walking literature that ranges from Surrealist perambulation to Situationist psychogeography This MIT Press edition includes the complete text in translation as well as Benjamin s essay on Walking in Berlin, originally written as a review of the book s original edition."/>
  • Kindle Edition
  • 304 pages
  • Walking in Berlin: A Flaneur in the Capital
  • Franz Hessel
  • English
  • 06 October 2017

About the Author: Franz Hessel

Franz Hessel, Berlin: A PDF ↠ Berlin born son of a Jewish banking family, was a writer and translator, translating works by Casanova, Stendhal, and Balzac, as well Walking in PDF/EPUB ² as collaborating with Walter Benjamin on a translation of Proust s la recherche du temps perdu into German Hessel died in early , shortly after in Berlin: A eBook ¸ his release from an internment camp.



10 thoughts on “Walking in Berlin: A Flaneur in the Capital

  1. Nat K Nat K says:

    To date, perhaps Berlin hasn t really been loved enough Oh to be a fl neur I love the idea of spending my days absorbing a city s idiosyncrasies and its vibe and energy, then putting pen to paper to share my bon mots.Alas, there seem to be no vacancies for a fl neur, so I live vicariously through books such as theseThe fl neur reads the street, and human faces, displays, window dressings, caf terraces, trains, cars and trees become letters that yield the words, sentences, and pages of a boTo date, perhaps Berlin hasn t really been loved enough Oh to be a fl neur I love the idea of spending my days absorbing a city s idiosyncrasies and its vibe and energy, then putting pen to paper to share my bon mots.Alas, there seem to be no vacancies for a fl neur, so I live vicariously through books such as theseThe fl neur reads the street, and human faces, displays, window dressings, caf terraces, trains, cars and trees become letters that yield the words, sentences, and pages of a book that is always new First published in 1929, this is part travelogue, part history lesson, part social science study Walking In Berlin has a lovely, gentle, meandering writing style Franz Hessel certainly knew his stuff, and we re given a lot of fascinating information about the areas and buildings that he s taking us to The nightclubs, the coffee houses, the museums parks They re all here.But you cannot run too far ahead You must walk with Herr Hessel, as he strolls up and down Berlin s districts This is a book that you simply cannot rush through, not matter how fast a reader you are.Take your time, look around and enjoy the trip

  2. Meike Meike says:

    Walter Benjamin and Thorsten Nagelschmidt have made me read it what a combo Walter Benjamin and Thorsten Nagelschmidt have made me read it what a combo

  3. Tripfiction Tripfiction says:

    Memoir set in BERLIN of the 1920sA physically delightful book, the unusual pink and turquoise cover really caught my eye A perfect book to take to Berlin to get under the granite and stones facades of this imposing and historically rich city, and gain a real sense of perspective of the legacy evident all around today.Franz Hessel saw himself as a fl neur, someone who sauntered about the capital on foot, and sometimes by car He would observe the buildings and the people as they went about their Memoir set in BERLIN of the 1920sA physically delightful book, the unusual pink and turquoise cover really caught my eye A perfect book to take to Berlin to get under the granite and stones facades of this imposing and historically rich city, and gain a real sense of perspective of the legacy evident all around today.Franz Hessel saw himself as a fl neur, someone who sauntered about the capital on foot, and sometimes by car He would observe the buildings and the people as they went about their daily business Meandering at times, incisive at others, he brings to life an era that is usually accessible only through blurred black and white photos.He chooses a theme or a Kiez an area, but I doubt if they were called that then and ponders the historical associations combined with what he could see then and there There is a real sense of immediacy, as he glides through the streets and stops and reflects At the heart of his musing he felt that to date, perhaps, Berlin hasn t been loved enough and this memoir is his ode to this city.He considered periods of history and happenings as he made his rounds His eyes alighted, for example, on the gilded picture frames that came into vogue after the austerity of WW1and the later inflation the need for people to have something glittery and showy was paramount How Charlottenburg was created out of the village of Lietzow and how the exotic animals in the Tiergarten each had buildings to reflect their provenance the camel house for example was a mosque Statues in the Tiergarten were called the Puppen and later the phrase bis in die Puppen was absorbed into everyday language Google Translate will have you believe it mean up in the dolls but in fact means into the wee small hours or very late Wine, even, used to be produced in the environs of the city, sour as it was Tempelhof, the original airport, was named after the Knights Templar, and that, at that point in the 1920s he says there s really no reason to visit Neuk lln , actually one of the up and coming neighbourhoods of today.He observed how the original Alexanderplatz was already being rebuilt in the 1920s, and this led me in turn to ponder how much change this particular city has seen Alexanderplatz today would be utterly unrecognisable to the citizens a century ago, having undergone a further major reform when the city was divided The Fernsehturm pictured with the book was the status symbol of the Eastern sector and when the sun shines it is possible to see a cross on the globe, thought to be an irony in the design as religion was eschewed under Communism It was erected in 1969.Walking in Berlin is a guide to enlighten and please, aimed, I imagine at those who know the city reasonably well already For anyone who is unfamiliar with Berlin there can be simply too much information to assimilate and link with the city as it is today Plenty of footnotes, however, do help to guide the reader a little further.The translation still has the feel of the original German, it retains a slightly stilted structure, underlining that this is indeed a work of translation I felt this was an intended device, to anchor it in the 1920s, although there were slang turns of phrase such as the hideous staircase was gotten rid of which left me questioning some of the quality of the translation.Overall an interesting read for someone who is reasonably familiar with the city and who would like to get a sense of the history, manners and feel of Berlin of the 1920s and how much of that era still echoes today

  4. Tosh Tosh says:

    I was expecting somethingexperimental or an odd point of view with regards to Franz Hessel s Walking in Berlin The narration is very straight forward and reads like a travel guide to a city The interesting aspect is that this is Berlin in the 1920s and this is first person reportage of a very interesting city in a fascinating period of 20th century history Hessel gives all the senses in his writing of what I have to imagine is his favorite city Berlin, especially in the 1920s, draws I was expecting somethingexperimental or an odd point of view with regards to Franz Hessel s Walking in Berlin The narration is very straight forward and reads like a travel guide to a city The interesting aspect is that this is Berlin in the 1920s and this is first person reportage of a very interesting city in a fascinating period of 20th century history Hessel gives all the senses in his writing of what I have to imagine is his favorite city Berlin, especially in the 1920s, draws my imagination of life being lived in a very dangerous manner It s odd to me that Hessel doesn t discuss or acknowledge the Far Right movement that was taking place in the metropolis Every sense of politics is zapped out of the reporting What s interesting is the snapshot view of Berlin at this time I feel it was written for the moment and not for history The irony is that we now read this book due to the city s history, and what happens afterward Not one of my favorite books on the subject matter of Berlin, but important for the student studying the city, or those who are curious about a first person observation at its time

  5. Sean Sean says:

    Just as Eug ne Atget captured the disappearance of the old in a modernizing, late 19th century Paris, so Franz Hessel apropos of Weimar era Berlin, a city that s always on the go, always in the middle of becoming something else Reinventing the introspective meanderings of the fl neur figure, his travels detail a transient world with places and figures on the cusp of dematerializing into historical relics amidst the inexorable march of time And yet, one yearns for apenetrating insight i Just as Eug ne Atget captured the disappearance of the old in a modernizing, late 19th century Paris, so Franz Hessel apropos of Weimar era Berlin, a city that s always on the go, always in the middle of becoming something else Reinventing the introspective meanderings of the fl neur figure, his travels detail a transient world with places and figures on the cusp of dematerializing into historical relics amidst the inexorable march of time And yet, one yearns for apenetrating insight into the forces of modernity effecting these aberrations irreducible to surface inspection Such a critical endeavor, later to be taken up by Walter Benjamin in his magnum opus The Arcades Project, perhaps necessitates a temporal distance impossible within a documentation of the present I can t yet describe this emerging Berlin I can only praise it One s own History cannot be stepped outside of it is rather lived in

  6. Hannah Hannah says:

    Let us learn a bit of idleness and indulgence, and look at the thing that is Berlin, in its combination of chaos and luxury and meanness, solidity and spuriousness, peculiarity and respectability, until we become fond of it and find it beautiful, until it is beautiful This was another book that caught my eye at Daunt Books, with its lovely turquoise and pink cover Berlin is on my list of cities to visit, so I thought, why not try this book It is an interesting insight into what it was like iLet us learn a bit of idleness and indulgence, and look at the thing that is Berlin, in its combination of chaos and luxury and meanness, solidity and spuriousness, peculiarity and respectability, until we become fond of it and find it beautiful, until it is beautiful This was another book that caught my eye at Daunt Books, with its lovely turquoise and pink cover Berlin is on my list of cities to visit, so I thought, why not try this book It is an interesting insight into what it was like in the German capital during the 1920s Even though there are plenty of footnotes throughout the book, perhaps I would have understood some of the references better if I had already been to Berlin I would surely like to read this again after visiting Overall, this is a nice little book that captures a piece of history in Berlin It would be best enjoyed by Berliners or those who have been to the city before In my case, it makes me want to visit Berlin even

  7. Lysergius Lysergius says:

    The is an essential guide for anyone interested in the city of Berlin and its history Hessel is a great guide His walks across the city combine a bit of everything More to the point the fact that it was written in 1929 does not matter, since his accounts have a contemporary feel, and despite all the turmoil and upset that Berlin has endured, once cannot help but feel it is the same city described by Hessel all those years ago.

  8. Juan Jiménez García Juan Jiménez García says:

    Franz Hessel Gu a para un mundo que desaparecer Hemos le do libros sobre mundos que se pierden, irremediablemente El peat n de Par s, editado tambi n por Errata Naturae, podr a ser uno de ellos Son como cajitas en las que se guardan un mont n de cosas con la certeza de que no estar n en breve o dejaron de estar no hace mucho Con una especie de necesidad de preservar la ciudad, pero tambi n los recuerdos La infancia o aquellos sitios que significaron algo Sitios que significaron algo pero t Franz Hessel Gu a para un mundo que desaparecer Hemos le do libros sobre mundos que se pierden, irremediablemente El peat n de Par s, editado tambi n por Errata Naturae, podr a ser uno de ellos Son como cajitas en las que se guardan un mont n de cosas con la certeza de que no estar n en breve o dejaron de estar no hace mucho Con una especie de necesidad de preservar la ciudad, pero tambi n los recuerdos La infancia o aquellos sitios que significaron algo Sitios que significaron algo pero tambi n cu l era aquel significado Para quien escribe o para sus contempor neos Pero Berl n no era Par s, ni Franz Hessel era L on Paul Fargue Tampoco sus pocas coincid an Leyendo al escritor alem n es imposible dejar de pensar en el a o en que el libro fue escrito 1929 La Rep blica de Weimar lleva diez a os dando tumbos por la Historia 1929 ser a el a o de la Gran Depresi n Cuatro a os despu s, el Partido Nacional Socialista Alem n de los Trabajadores de Adolf Hitler llegar a al poder El curso de los acontecimientos m s o menos lo sabemos El final tambi n Entre todo, la destrucci n de Berl n, convertida en un mont n de escombros As pues, estos Paseos por Berl n son tambi n la historia de una ciudad devastada.Pero el porvenir es largo, dec a Louis Althusser, y mientras este llegaba, Franz Hessel paseaba por ese Berl n gris, no por triste, sino porque Berl n siempre fue una ciudad en ese color Una ciudad monumental, como su Historia Y Hessel tambi n se ocupa de ella Como si fuera preciso nombrar las cosas, para que no desaparezcan, recorrer calles y plazas, a pie o velozmente cuando la velocidad era otra cosa en coche Como un turista o como alguien que rememora, como un paseante solitario o como un visitante, como alguien que mira o alguien que est ah para dar testimonio tambi n de las personas que poblaron aquel Berl n que ven a de un mont n de desastres y derrotas sin saber que se encaminaba hacia otros desastres y derrotas a n m s terribles.En Hessel est el tiempo que pasa dulcemente, mientras la ciudad se teje y desteje, porque en Berl n siempre pareci existir esa necesidad de inventarse constantemente, de huir hacia adelante Le gustaba caminar lentamente, un corredor de fondo de la literatura peatonal, que nunca pretendi ganar ninguna carrera A diferencia de Fargue y vuelvo una y otra vez a l como referencia de una forma de entender la vida no se paraba en cada bar o caf y tampoco era una cuesti n de ver la vida desde un rinc n Como un po tico registrador de la propiedad, hay que inventariar edificios, animales del zool gico, hombres aves nocturnos y otros seres que pueblan o mejor son las ciudades No todo puede estar, pero hay que intentarlo, porque el peat n de Berl n debe hacer que las cosas sean indestructibles Las palabras, al contrario que las piedras, permanecer n Y esa es la verdadera obra del fl neur que escribe, ese ser capaz de construir ciudades de letras, como esas otras ciudades recortables y montables de nuestra infancia.Franz Hessel es esa torre Eiffel de Guillaume Apollinaire que pastoreaba un mundo antiguo Un bello mundo antiguo, un bonito presente, un triste futuro todav a desconocido y por llegar Y como Andr Breton, tenemos que gritar e inventar abandonadlo todo, abandonad la comodidad de vuestras casas, vuestros televisores, liberaos de redes sociales, de amigos imaginarios, s , abandonadlo todo Salid a las calles, pasead, recorred esas ciudades visibles, mientras est n ah , mientras sean algo.Escrito para D tour

  9. Joseph Hirsch Joseph Hirsch says:

    It s a tragedy thatof Hessel s work isn t available in English translation This is lumped in with other flaneur pieces that take a worm s eye view of interwar Weimar Germany, but Hessel s descriptive power, his sense of humor, and his knowledge of German history are too keen for this work to be limited or categorized It s just great literature.The heart of the work is The Tour, a long Feuilleton piece that describes a day trip the author took with several tourists through Berlin s ga It s a tragedy thatof Hessel s work isn t available in English translation This is lumped in with other flaneur pieces that take a worm s eye view of interwar Weimar Germany, but Hessel s descriptive power, his sense of humor, and his knowledge of German history are too keen for this work to be limited or categorized It s just great literature.The heart of the work is The Tour, a long Feuilleton piece that describes a day trip the author took with several tourists through Berlin s gardens, markets, arts districts, and statuary lined streets The other pieces are uniformly strong, although standouts in my opinion include his description of the seedy Alexanderplatz neighborhood and his narration of what goes on inside Berlin s factories and slaughterhouses the Germans at the time had an obsession with rationalization and efficiency and American iterations of the same, such as Henry Ford s assembly lines.Someone once quipped that Los Angeles is like your brain you can only utilize ten percent or so The same could be said of Berlin, which is mysterious, sad, grim, exciting, and beautiful all at the same time Berlin started as a swampy military garrison of the Brandenburg Hohenzollern empire and somehow grew into the cultural capital of Germany and for a time became the dividing line between the two primary political systems of our time David Bowie captured close to one hundred percent of the city s tone in his music Hessel has achieved something approximating singularity with the city in this book, despite his assertions that he wasn t muchthan skimming the surface when he was walking the streets and making his observations He makes understanding the city s past, present, and future seem effortless, but it can t be easy because so many have failed at least for this reader where this book succeeds Highest recommendation, for travelers, historians, and general literature fans

  10. Alison P Alison P says:

    Don t be misled by the long read time I loved this book It is not one to be rushed, but instead visited from time to time and savoured whenever a little Berlin magic is needed.

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