The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our


The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our Sons, Their Problems at School, and What Parents and Educators Must Do ➯ [Read] ➫ The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our Sons, Their Problems at School, and What Parents and Educators Must Do By Peg Tyre ➻ – Thomashillier.co.uk From the moment they step into the classroom, boys begin to struggle They get expelled from preschool nearly five times more often than girls; in elementary school, they’re diagnosed with learning d From the moment they step into the classroom, with Boys: eBook ✓ boys begin to struggle They get expelled from preschool nearly five times often than girls; The Trouble Kindle - in elementary school, they’re diagnosed with learning disorders four times as often By eighth grade huge numbers are reading below basic level And by Trouble with Boys: Epub Þ high school, they’re heavily outnumbered in AP classes and, save for the realm of athletics, show indifference to most extra­curricular activities Perhaps most alarmingly, boys now account for less thanpercent of those enrolled in college, and the gap widens every semester!The imbalance in higher education isn’t just a “boy problem,” though Boys’ decreasing college attendance is bad news for girls, too, because ad­missions officers seeking balanced student bodies pass over girls in favor of boys The growing gender imbalance in education portends massive shifts for the next generation: how much they make and whom they marry Interviewing hundreds of parents, kids, teachers, and experts, awardwinning journalist Peg Tyre drills below the eyecatching statistics to examine how the educational system is failing our sons She explores the convergence of culprits, from the emphasis on highstress academics in preschool and kindergarten, when most boys just can’t tolerate sitting still, to the outright banning of recess, from the demands of No Child Left Behind, with its rigid emphasis on testtaking, to the boyunfriendly modern curriculum with its focus on writing about “feelings” and its purging of “highaction” reading material, from the rise of video gaming and schools’ unease with technology to the lack of male teachers as role modelsBut this passionate, clearheaded book isn’t an exercise in fingerpointing Tyre, the mother of two sons, offers notes from the front lines—the testimony of teachers and other school officials who are trying new techniques to motivate boys to learn again, one classroom at a time The Trouble with Boys gives parents, educators, and anyone concerned about the state of education a manifesto for change—one we must undertake right away lest school become, for millions of boys, unalterably a “girl thing”From the Hardcover edition.

    The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our boys now account for less thanpercent of those enrolled in college, and the gap widens every semester!The imbalance in higher education isn’t just a “boy problem,” though Boys’ decreasing college attendance is bad news for girls, too, because ad­missions officers seeking balanced student bodies pass over girls in favor of boys The growing gender imbalance in education portends massive shifts for the next generation: how much they make and whom they marry Interviewing hundreds of parents, kids, teachers, and experts, awardwinning journalist Peg Tyre drills below the eyecatching statistics to examine how the educational system is failing our sons She explores the convergence of culprits, from the emphasis on highstress academics in preschool and kindergarten, when most boys just can’t tolerate sitting still, to the outright banning of recess, from the demands of No Child Left Behind, with its rigid emphasis on testtaking, to the boyunfriendly modern curriculum with its focus on writing about “feelings” and its purging of “highaction” reading material, from the rise of video gaming and schools’ unease with technology to the lack of male teachers as role modelsBut this passionate, clearheaded book isn’t an exercise in fingerpointing Tyre, the mother of two sons, offers notes from the front lines—the testimony of teachers and other school officials who are trying new techniques to motivate boys to learn again, one classroom at a time The Trouble with Boys gives parents, educators, and anyone concerned about the state of education a manifesto for change—one we must undertake right away lest school become, for millions of boys, unalterably a “girl thing”From the Hardcover edition."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our Sons, Their Problems at School, and What Parents and Educators Must Do
  • Peg Tyre
  • English
  • 25 December 2019
  • 9780307381286

About the Author: Peg Tyre

Is a wellknown author, some of his books with Boys: eBook ✓ with Boys: eBook are a fascination for readers like in the The Trouble with Boys: The Trouble Kindle - A Surprising Report The Trouble Kindle Card on Our Sons, Their Problems at School, and What Parents and Educators Must Do book, this is Trouble with Boys: Epub Þ one of the most wanted Peg Trouble with Boys: Epub Tyre author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our Sons, Their Problems at School, and What Parents and Educators Must Do

  1. Jill Jill says:

    I found this book thought provoking, but ultimately lacking. The book relies on an essentialist understanding of gender--you could structure a drinking game around the frequency of mention of how much boys love trucks, for example--that limits its claims. Every page, I asked WHY: why are boys less verbal entering school? why do boys require more physical activity to succeed in school? why do boys need gross-out humor to find discussion accessible?

    In this orientation, Tyre misses a critical analytical step in my mind. Averages can mislead; not all boys are suffering. Who are the boys who are in trouble, and why? The answer may well be systemic practices that disadvantage boys (from which some high achievers are more immune). From her arguments, though, it's impossible to say.

    Many of the conclusions she ultimately draws about how schools must change to accommodate boys are excellent, and would benefit students of all genders. It's also extremely sensitive to how charged the question of the Boy Crisis is from many angles. I came to this book as a feminist with a blind spot on this issue, and I appreciated the care Tyre took to articulate her argument in a way that respected the hard work of feminists to attain educational equity for girls, and the suspicion with which some feminists view claims of a boy crisis.

  2. Stephanie Stephanie says:

    For all you that have boys out there, this is a must read. The book showcases the problems that boys are having in our school system and how we can help them succeed. I was amazed by statistics such as boys get diagnosed with ADHD over 5 times the amount of girls, boys are declining in subjects such as Math and Science, and the gender gap on college campuses between girls and boys are increasing. Very interesting. I will be more aware of how to make sure the schools are good for my boys.

  3. Claudia Claudia says:

    The longer boys stay in school, the farther they fall behind the girls. And we teachers and parents allow that to happen.

    This book has rocked me to the foundation of my beliefs about education. Tyre's discussions of the research support what I 'felt' about education: we've rigged the system toward little girls, and our boys may NEVER, NEVER catch up. There are now universities that have to practice quiet 'affirmative action' to bring in more male students...so while males are not the beneficaries of quotas. How did it get to this? It starts the first time a preschool teacher complains that her little boys can't sit still for circle time. It continues with subtle and not-wo-subtle messages to boys, to girls, to boys' parents: school will not adapt to you; you must adapt to school.

    The chapter on literacy both supported my Reading for Pleasure class and the philosophy of choice, of movement, of building stamina...but it also challenged me to go farther...to continue to look for appropriate books, to give boys a way to write about books that doesn't necessarily include writing about feelings...a boy just today told me he can't write about books because he doesn't like to write about his feelings. I can fix that with assignments...the fact boys don't talk to each other about books, I can fix that. Giving boys wider choices ...I can fix that!

    I will certainly reread this one.

  4. Meredith Meredith says:

    It was interesting to read this book as an elementary female teacher. As I read, I realized that many of my techniques in the classroom fit for boys- and not girls. Boys need to move and think differently than girls. You can either take this book completely to heart or pick and choose ideas.

  5. Mary Mary says:

    The author argues that while boys have traditionally excelled in school, the feminist movement of the 1970s pushed teachers/ lawmakers/ society members to concentrate on girls' progress in school. Now the new gender gap has boys lagging further and further behind girls. In fact, boys start futher behind in reading and writing and never catch up.

    All kids need physical activity, but boys especially are yelled at for their physical movements in the classroom. Recess time is either structured or taken away completely. Movement is vital because it actually helps kids focus (106).

    Some solutions include: give kids books they like (action, non-fiction, male protagonists, irreverent humor) give kids books they like, movement every 15-20 minutes, allowing a louder noise level in the classroom, find uber-male role models and have them read to elementary school students....

    Three decades of research is unequivocal: The better a child reads, the greater is the probability that the child will succeed in school (138).

    Reading and writing are make-or-break skills in today's economy. Males who fail to earn a high school diploma are less likely to have a stead job, less likely to get married, and more likely to get divorced if they do marry. They are more likely to have contact with prison and the welfare system and to live in poverty. Not suprisingly, those negative experiences undermine a person's health and longevity. Men who aren't well educated and are single are far more prone to chronic aliments such as health disease and cancer. Men who are unmarried high school dropouts don't live as long as educated married men (140).

    Writing: boys want to write about what they want/create a different world, writing makes hands hurt.

    Girls write for the teacher, boys write for each other. Boys use kid language not classroom language. Their stories are goofy, fanciful, sarcastic, funny and designed for the amusement of their peers (157). This shows me that I need to do more Story Starters and encourage sharing in the class because this assists the boys with their voice. The book also talks about be prepared for [boys:] to tackle dangerous topics replete with violence, mayhem, and gore: 'We need to redefine our goals in teaching reading so that we can champion the great energy boys can bring to a project and their willingness to take risks (158).

    One group asks boys, Well, how are you going to attract and hold on to a well-spoken, well-dressed, educated woman if you yourself are not well spoken and well dressed and you don't even make it through high school? (227).

    Issues boys have in school: organization, writing neatly, colloborating instead of competing, and writing about feelings.

    Teachers should: pay attention to males' progress in reading and writing, vary book choices and writing topics, help students discover the joys of reading.

  6. Amanda Amanda says:

    I strongly feel every K-12 teacher should read this book. It offers different point of view than traditional opinion about school-aged, active, smart boys. It appears that schools have been making progress on helping boys succeed and thrive, but it has a long way to go. the book explains how schools and parents should have better understanding that boys have different ways to learn, play and socialize than girls, and how to monitor and modify learning environment and methods to help boys.

  7. Meghan Pinson Meghan Pinson says:

    On the edge of out of date, but still interesting. Gave me some ideas for talking points with teachers.

  8. Tory Wagner Tory Wagner says:

    The Trouble with Boys by Peg Tyre is an interesting compilation of studies concerning outcomes for boys in reading and math in both public and private schools. As a retired teacher, I can validate much of the research which points to the idea that males and females learn differently. How to use that information to improve outcomes is a whole different matter. A very thought provoking book on an important matter.

  9. Brittney Brittney says:

    The author seems to talk in circles. She shares a lot of conflicting research, many statistics, and few suggestions. She devotes a whole chapter to brain-based research only to conclude that “brain-based” learning is a fad and parents should “be wary” of it. Same-sex schools are touched on and Tyre advises parents to “proceed with caution.” This all being said after a whole chapter’s worth of research shows us that the only groups that benefit from this model of schooling are girls and poor African American boys. Maybe she should advise parents to only enroll students in same sex schools if they are within these two categories? Tyre wraps up her book with some particular ideas about how to conquer the “trouble with boys.” She suggests people lobby Congress to pass bills that authorize money to be spent on improving boys’ academic performance. She also says we need to stop “acting as if girls are still an underserved population.” (p. 281) With the massively harmful budget cuts we are currently experiencing, it hardly seems fair to spend money on boys alone. Also, what happens to girls when we start ignoring them and focusing on boys? I take issue with ignoring ANY one group. Another suggestion she offers up is creating more science and math camps and social organizations like Girl Scouts. Last time I checked, there are plenty of science and math camps for boys and a very largely respected and well-known organization for boys called Boy Scouts. She also offers her opinions on the problems with boys that teachers are responsible for. In fact, many times throughout the book, she can be found pointing the finger in the direction of teachers, new teachers especially. While she is careful to try and sugarcoat these accusations, it still leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
    As a journalist, I expected Tyre to be more objective and provide research to support her suggestions. Overall, am I convinced that there is a problem with boys? I am really not sure. I plan on reading more on the topic because Tyre’s style does not sit right with me. Tyre’s research has too many holes in my opinion and because of this, I am not convinced of most of what she says. If there is in deed trouble with boys, I hope to find more realistic ways to combat it in another book. Richard Whitmire’s, Why Boys Fail, may be a better fit for me.

  10. Natalie Natalie says:

    I'm absorbing as much as I can of this book but I think I'll buy it. I know our school system is great, our preschool is great, but I am going to try to make darn sure that my son isn't one of the tons of boys left behind in an increasingly test-oriented, sit-still-centric education system. It's not like Samantha's a sit still sort of kid anyway, so I might learn some valuable tips to help her even though she's not a boy :-)

    So far I think this is one of the most important books I've read as a parent.

    *****

    I hated sending this back to the library! I love how one idea was to have cops in uniform, guns and all, in the classroom reading to students to make reading seem more manly. Then the newsletter for my local school district came and there was a sheriff in uniform reading to students at the local elementary school. I don't think I need to worry about them being sensitive to boys at our school - they're already on the ball. But I now have extra tips to make sure that I teach Tom a love of reading like we have Sam (who just turned 4 and already reading 3 and 4 letter words!)

    **********
    My awesome sister gave me a copy of this for my birthday. Whooo-hooo!! Now I own it and can review it whenever necessary. Just having the book in my house makes me feel smarter ;-)

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