The Orange Grove ePUB ☆ The Orange ePUB ½


10 thoughts on “The Orange Grove

  1. Ina Cawl Ina Cawl says:

    Living in Somalia where it is tribal country where you have hundreds of people who you can claim they are your cousin and they are your shelter when everything around is crumblingAt one side being tribal it means you have cousins who will help you in marriagecousins who would help when disaster or death struck you family as they are your only social securitybut this model also has negative sides to it if you were unfortunately killed by people from other nation or tribe you can be sure that your tribe would eventually take revenge for you and those who will help you seek justice or revenge are your fellow cousins from your tribethis social model is the reason for my nation to go through 25 years of civil war where you don't know where this cycle of violence has started  but you sure it would continue for long timethis social model is also what made the America to be stuck fighting 17 years with tribesmen all way from Mali to Somalia to middle east to Afghanistan and it seems there is no end to this endless warhis is short which is almost 174 pages which explores the nature of terrorism and extremismhow young children are recruited to be killing machine and how religion can be corrupted and used to explain the horrific things humans can do to each otherthis novel starts with the twin who lives happily in their orange farm where suddenly a missile launched from the other side of the mountain struck the twin grand parents Amed and Aziz found their grandparents in the ruins of their house Their grandmother’s skull had been smashed in by a beam Their grandfather was lying in his bedroom his body shredded by the bomb that had come from the side of the mountain where every night the sun disappeared after that unfortunate incident the family is approached by three men who want to condole the family for their tragedy but also see if they are ready to take revenge of the people who launched that missile into their grandfather homebut before the one of the twins are chosen to be martyr or to carry out suicide attack they are visited by their older friend who is 15 and was about carrying suicide into the people from other side of the mountainhere comes Soulayed who is recruiting this children to their demise and here is how he is convincing Halim the twin older friend to not be sympathetic with the enemyYour softness weakens us and brings us shame Where is your anger? I do not hear it Listen to me Halim our enemies are dogs They are like us you think because their faces are faces of men That’s an illusion Look at them with the eyes of your ancestors and you’ll see what these faces are really made of They are made of our death In a single enemy face you can see our annihilation a thousand timeseventually hecrossed the frontier Soulayed told him how He passed through a secret tunnel Then he climbed onto a crowded bus At noon he blew himself up”this book tries to explain how people fall into terrorism hands and how they become radicalized and how even childhood is lost is corrupted when you are in a war To kill time they played at blowing themselves up in the orange grove Aziz had stolen an old belt from his father that they weighted with three tin cans full of sand They took turns wearing it slipping into the skin of a future martyr The orange trees also played war with them The trees became enemies endless rows of warriors poised to launch their explosive fruits at the slightest suspicious noise The boys worked their way between them crawling and scraping their knees eventually even after one the twins are selected to carry out the suicide operation and the death one the twin the book leaves us with this uestion He was asking himself the same uestions about evil It was too easy to accuse those who committed war crimes of being assassins or wild beasts Especially when those who judged them lived far from the circumstances that had provoked the conflicts whose origins were lost in the vortex of history What would he have done in a comparable situation? Would he like millions of other men have been capable of fighting for an idea a scrap of earth a border or even oil? Would he too have been conditioned to kill innocents women and children? it is uite amazing book to read especially if you are a Western who are baffled  and incapable of understanding why war in this region continues for so long


  2. Gumble& Gumble& says:

    This book was published by the UK small press Peirene Press “a boutiue publishing house with a traditional commitment to first class European literature in high uality translation” and whose style is described by the TLS as “Two hour books to be devoured in a single sitting; literary cinema for those fatigued by film”This book represents a slight variation on both of these themes firstly as a translation of a uebecois novel the author Larry Tremblay lives in Montreal and is the author of some 30 books although this is only his third novel; the translator Sheila Fischman has translated than 150 uebecois novels into English; secondly it is even shorter than the normal and in my case easily read on a 40 minute train journeyThe attached link gives a comprehensive summary of the plot of the novel and its key themes always being interested in new additions to the twins in literature genre particularly when such twins are identical and enjoying the deliberately country free and therefore figurative nature of the examination of civiltribal wars I felt strangely dissatisfied by the setting of the later dénouement of the earlier action in an acting classes play In particular I started this section hoping that it was a clever and deliberately self referential critiue of the pretensions of Western artists to believe that their artistic endeavours enabled them to fully emphasise with the reality of life in a war zone; but concluded it with the sense that this book itself was a classic example and celebration of that pretension


  3. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    35 Longlisted for the 2017 International Dublin formerly IMPAC literary award this is the fable like story of one family in the war torn Middle East and the way notions of justice and sacrifice drive them to make extreme choices Tamara and Zahed live with their twin sons nine year old Aziz and Ahmed alongside an orange grove planted by Zahed’s father Soulayed a militant elder from the next village describes it thusYour father Mounir worked his whole life on this arid soil It was desert here With God’s help your father worked a miracle Made oranges grow where there had been only sand and stonesWhen Mounir and his wife Shahina are killed in a bombing Soulayed stands among the ruins and counsels Zahed to seek revenge against their enemies by sending one of his sons to be a suicide bomber There’s no doubt Soulayed is manipulating this grief stricken family to his own ends but he isn’t solely to blame when their culture at large romanticizes martyrdomZahed makes his choice but Tamara won’t accept it In a clever reprise of the Genesis story of Jacob and Esau she helps the boys to make a switch right under their father’s nose The last third of the book like a coda zooms ahead 11 years to show us the surviving brother coming to the end of a four year theatre training program in Montreal He’s given a starring role in his teacher’s wartime play but the story line cuts a little too close to the bone and for the first time he tells a stranger the story of two brothers one who died and one who livedPeirene Press issues novellas in trios This is the second in the “East and West Looking Both Ways” series; I’ve also reviewed the first The Last Summer by Ricarda Huch Tremblay and Huch both tackle the theme of betrayal and the practice of choosing one person to die for the crimes of the many The Orange Grove has a simple style that edges towards flatness but is saved by the occasional striking metaphor eg “Minutes stretched out as if made of dough” A book about suicide bombing could easily turn mawkish but the restrained narration reins it in to create a tight and fairly engrossing tale of family ties and religious motivationsOriginally published with images on my blog Bookish Beck


  4. Kirsty Kirsty says:

    Prolific French Canadian author Larry Tremblay's The Orange Grove is number 23 upon the Peirene Press list published as part of 2017's series East and West It has been translated from its original French by Sheila Fischman and has sold over 25000 copies in Tremblay's native Canada Longlisted for the 2017 IMPAC award and the winner of eight others The Orange Grove looks at 'personal costs of war in the Middle East' and engages with 'themes of the family and grief in general' Meike Ziervogel founder of Peirene says of the novella 'This story made me cry It reminds us of our obligation to forgive ourselves as well as others' The Orange Grove focuses upon twin brothers Ahmed and Aziz who are living on their grandparents' orange grove in an unnamed Middle Eastern country When their grandparents are killed on their homestead in a bombing attack the boys 'become pawns in their country's civil war' leaving their parents with the devastating choice of which son they should save Soulayed an acuaintance of Ahmed and Amir's father takes the boys away from his family with their father's permission after saying just how important the small boys are to the war effort He tells them 'Do you see now what you've accomplished? You found a road to lead you to that strange town You're the only ones who've done it Others who've tried to do so were blown to smithereens by the mines In a few days one of you ill go back there You Aziz or you Ahmed Your father will decide And the one who is chosen will wear a belt of explosives He will go down to that strange town and make it disappear forever'The writing particularly that which deals with violent scenes and aftermaths is rather matter of fact; sometimes it is even rendered coldly and is almost entirely devoid of emotion This can be seen when the twins discover the mutilated bodies of their grandparents 'Their grandmother's skull had been smashed by a beam Their grandfather was lying in his bedroom his body ripped apart by the bomb that had come from the side of the mountain where every evening the sun disappeared' Much of the prose in fact is simplistic but sometimes deceptively so There are flickers of beauty at times with regard to descriptions Of the twins' mother Tamara for instance Tremblay writes 'Some nights the moon made her think of a fingernail impression in the flesh of the sky She liked these moments when she was alone before infinity' The novella's dialogue on the other hand is often rather profoundI was reminded of another of Peirene's publications Hamid Ismailov's The Dead Lake whilst reading The Orange Grove Whilst the novella undoubtedly tells an important story there is the same simplicity to it at times and the same kind of detachment I never felt as though I truly learnt much about the characters who people Tremblay's work which comes across almost like a contemporary fable The boys are both naive and knowing; an interesting contrast which I cannot help but think could have been made of Regardless The Orange Grove is a timely work which raises uestions about choice family religion society grief loss revenge and deception A lot is packed into the pages of this very human novella and the whole could easily be extended into a much longer novel Overall I found The Orange Grove an important read but ultimately a slightly underwhelming one


  5. Marina Marina says:

    Books 32 2019 This books to accomplish Tsundoku Books Challenge and OWLsReadathon 2019 34 of 5 stars I've got this books as recommendation when i visited Transit Santa as few weeks ago Since the theme is about displacement i'm really curious about two twins playing a kite but they have different fate lies beyond themThe story is makes me sad for sure but it is not really breaking my heart into pieces like i read The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns But I imagine if i became Aziz or Ahmed am I that Brave enough to accomplish the mission is? I hate war since it makes innocence people became victims and it is children why they have to participate in this tragic war?Thanks God Finally I can finished my Herbology subjects I hope I can't disappoint Professor Sprout OWLsReadathon 2019 Challenge Herbology Read a book with a plant on the cover


  6. Ayala Levinger Ayala Levinger says:

    I bought this book in a collection of 3 books that are about refugees in different places and time This was the first inthe collection I have read It was a good read Very emotional and heartbreaking story about a family with a twin 9 years old boys in times of a civil war I didn't read it in 2 hours one sirting like watching a movie because it is uite sad and I needed to take a break But after passing the half of it I read the second half in one sitting


  7. Ashley Ashley says:

    Rating 35It's pretty hard to summarize this book so I pretty much have the option of no spoilers or a big spoiler I'm going with no spoilers so this is going to sound pretty vague Amed and Aziz are twins who live in an unnamed war torn country They haven't really experienced a personal loss due to this war until their grandparents' house is bombed killing them both His parents dead their father is devastated and vulnerable and some men are willing to take advantage of that to help their father get his revengeI read this book for my book club otherwise I don't think I would've otherwise picked it up It's not my kind of novel but it was a short and powerful one At first I wasn't sure what I was reading or what the point of it was but it soon became evident Once you realize the extent of what's going on in this book you'll be shocked at both the actions and the reception Not really being touched by war myself being a teen in Canada with none of my family members having been in wars and not wanting to bring up the subject to my grandparents it was brutal to read the extent that these individuals go to because they feel it's the only way they can win I'm aware that I'm not really giving a lot of information but with the book being so short there's not a lot to talk about without revealing the big picture which I don't want to do The last 40 pages or so of the book is what really got to me and had me thinking That was definitely the highlight for meOverall this was a short and powerful book about war and the effects it has on normal families particularly the children It was shocking and heartbreaking and I can't say that it necessarily gave me any new information but it did give me a new perspective on war If this book sounds interesting to you then definitely give it a go It's pretty short so even if you end up not liking it you could probably blast through it anyway


  8. Alanna King Alanna King says:

    This little book just 157 pages is not for the faint of heart and is not a light read It spans the life of Amed who makes the horrible choice to swap places with his brother as a child rather than to suicide bomb a target in revenge for the death of his grandparents Sweeping across continents and across time periods in Amed's life this book feels like an epic journey of a tortured soul He is constantly visited by the ghosts of his past and they stir Amed to flee rather than deal with his crisis of conscience Not until the ending does Tremblay provide a Deus ex Machina in the form of a tortured play where Amed can finally bare all in a giant cathartic finale I read this book as part of the Ontario Library Association's White Pine program The translation is awkward feeling and the ending is too abrupt and yet I would put this book in the canon alongside Elie Wiesel Night for the way it has perfectly captured the zeitgeist of our war torn era and the human migration that is a result of it Small but mighty The Orange Grove spoke to me on many levels In the secondary school classroom it would ignite all sorts of entry level conversation on difficult topics


  9. Wahyu Novian Wahyu Novian says:

    He was asking himself the same uestions about evil It was too easy to accuse those who commited war crimes of being assassins or wild beasts Espescially when thise who judged them lived far from the circumstances that had provoked the conflicts whose origins were lost in the vortex of history What would he have done in a comparable situation? Would he like millions of other men have beena capable of fighting for an idea a scrap of earth a border or even oil? Would he too have been conditioned to kill innocents women and children?Started by a bomb strikes an orange grove one of the twin suddenly was choosen to carry a suicide bomb in revenge for the death of their grandparents This hearbreaking tale showed how awful the war is How children can be easily manipulated for the sake of adults how family can be easily destroyed how it is beyond reason human can do horrific things to an innocent mind I still cannot decide whether I like the ending or not But maybe it has important meaning about another side of the war and such As Peirene Press said on the reason they published this book “Since the dawn of civilization we have justified war by claiming that we are creating a better future for our children And yet don’t we run the risk of laying a curse on future generations?” PS I don't understand why people can be so cruel writing the fate of a twin like this yes I' still mad at you jkrowling Ofcourse I'm still intrigued by it 😔


  10. Izza Izza says:

    425 stars | The writing is as beautiful as the story is heartbreaking There are things in life I'll just never be able to understand


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The Orange Grove ❮Ebook❯ ➧ The Orange Grove Author Larry Tremblay – Thomashillier.co.uk War takes no prisoners It involves everyone even childrenTwin brothers Amed and Aziz live in the peaceful shade of their family’s orange grove But when a bomb kills the boys’ grandparents they bec War takes no prisoners It involves everyone even childrenTwin brothers Amed and Aziz live in the peaceful shade of their family’s orange grove But when a bomb kills the boys’ grandparents they become pawns in their country’s civil war Blood demands blood and at the command of a local militant group either Ahmed or Aziz must strap on a belt of explosives and make the ultimate sacrifice Years later the surviving twin works as an actor in wintry Montreal A theatre The Orange ePUB ½ director gives him a role that forces the young man to reconsider his decisions Will Ahmed – or is it Aziz – release himself from the pastWhy Peirene chose to publish this book'This story made me cry Since the dawn of civilisation we have justified war by claiming that we are creating a better future for our children And yet don’t we run the risk of laying a curse on future generations This story reminds us of our obligation to forgive – ourselves as well as others' Meike Ziervogel.

  • Paperback
  • 160 pages
  • The Orange Grove
  • Larry Tremblay
  • English
  • 13 July 2016

About the Author: Larry Tremblay

Larry Tremblay is a writer director actor and specialist in Kathakali an elaborate dance theatre form which he has studied on numerous trips to India He has published than twenty books as a playwright poet novelist and essayist and he is one of uebec’s most produced and translated playwrights his plays have been translated into twelve languages.