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The Burning Forest ❰EPUB❯ ✺ The Burning Forest Author Nandini Sundar – Thomashillier.co.uk Starting from 2005 when a government sponsored vigilante movement Salwa Judum killed hundreds and drove thousands of villagers into camps to the present day when it is the most militarized area in the Starting from when a government sponsored vigilante movement Salwa Judum killed hundreds and drove thousands of villagers into camps to the present day when it is the most militarized area in the country the war in Bastar has taken a heavy toll on the people of Bastar the security forces the Maoists and human rights activistsThis book chronicles how the armed conflict between the government and the Maoists has devastated the lives of some of India's poorest most vulnerable citizens The fact that Bastar has some of India's biggest The Burning eBook ë mineral reserves has made the conflict even intense and also destroyed the ecology and culture of Bastar.


10 thoughts on “The Burning Forest

  1. A Man Called Ove A Man Called Ove says:

    This is an important yet biased book on Salwa Judum the Chhatisgarh state's counter insurgency movement against the Naxalites Dry repetitive yet worth readingLet me try and arrange my thoughts on this 1 From the Bollywood movie BabyIntelligence Chief Danny Collectively 24 officers shahid hue hainDefense Minister's secretary Log to marenge hi unka to kaam hainAnd intelligence officer Akshay Kumar gets up and slaps him The author reminded me of the bureaucrat who was slapped She totally de humanised the police CRPF and the villagers who became part of the counter insurgency forces That is the biggest shortcoming of this book for me And it is the reason why the book will be called a polemic 2 The biggest uestion in my mind When India has free and fair elections why stops the Naxalists from contesting them and managing their own affairs with executive and legislative power ? The author has no arguments to offer Infact the fact that Maoism believes in violently overthrowing liberal democracy is not mentioned at all Why should I choose Maoist sponsored violence over state sponsored violencecorruption ? Why should I choose an evil at all ?However it is true that crony capitalists in their greed have partnered with the state to rob the natural resources which belong to the society especially to the locals Regulation of mining and environment protection is non existent And in this age of statism masuerading as nationalism books such as these need to be read so that we can know the gravity of the problem Also I agree with the author that the state needs to adopt a humane approach


  2. Sai Kishore Sai Kishore says:

    I think the knowledge came to him at last — only at the very last But the wilderness had found him out early and had taken on him a terrible vengeance for the fantastic invasion I think it had whispered to him things about himself which he did not know things of which he had no conception till he took counsel with this great solitude — and the whisper had proved irresistibly fascinatingAnything approaching the change that came over his features I have never seen before and hope never to see again Oh I wasn’t touched I was fascinated It was as though a veil had been rent I saw on that ivory face the expression of somber pride of ruthless power of craven terror — of an intense and hopeless despair Did he live his life again in every detail of desire temptation and surrender during that supreme moment of complete knowledge? He cried in a whisper at some image at some vision — he cried out twice a cry that was no than a breath — ‘The horror The horror”― Joseph Conrad


  3. Akshay Akshay says:

    Ultimately this book is a lost opportunity for someone with significant on the ground knowledge to help put this complex social dynamic into a clear perspective – one that provides the pros and cons of all sides Instead this book just degenerates into a series of opinion pieces stacked with an overwhelming amount of information This book is uite literally just a documentation of events rather than an attempt to coherently present the truth on the ground The author even says as much in the Introduction There is a complete dearth of any discussion on the ideologies objectives and demands of the Maoists or the villagers In essence this book is all about the ‘What’ with little to no discussion on the ‘Why’ In addition the author’s bias and lack of ethics manifests throughout the book distorting the truth by highlighting select facts and misrepresenting original sources Yes we all can agree that the solution to an armed insurgency is not for the Government and security forces to kill the villagers with impunity But this book doesn’t go anywhere beyond that very narrow scopeRead full review on my blog


  4. Anish Anish says:

    The book is totally a biased one and only complaints of atrocities committed by the security forces and political parties on the so called innocent adivasi people It also accuses every elected government of using the materialistic resources and not developing the conditions of the tribal people Although the book is very well written and facts are well drawn from reputed sources it's biasness cannot be forgotten


  5. Kaśyap Kaśyap says:

    A very well written and informative book on the Maoist insurgency in Bastar Nandini Sundar is an anthropologist who is well versed in the history of Bastar and she bases this narrative in the historical and economic roots of the conflict Shows the violence that is being perpetrated by the statemilitants and the big industries against the Adivasis way of life and their aspirations A bit repetitive but an important book if you want to understand the nature of the civil war and the displacement of populations in central India


  6. Ronit Konch Ronit Konch says:

    Extremely informative and heart wrenching book written from the perspective of the tribal communities of Bastar Gives particularly detailed information about the Salwa Judum and how it was utilized by the state to clear the grounds for big businesses to operate in the region Puts the blame of the whole insurgency on the inability of the state to provide the tribals with their basic needs Though she does not support Maoist violence but sympathizes with their need to do something to halt the exploitation of the local populace They have come to see that unless they resort to violence the government does not pay any attention to the problems afflicting them Points out how police stations vie with each other to declare themselves Maoist inflicted to get funds for armament As for the argument that development cannot happen as long as the Maoists are there she shows how in the adjoining regions without Maoists presence things are not much better in terms of administration Also shows the conflict between the indigenous tribals and the recent urban North Indian migrants who have lived there for a few decades now and consider themselves as belonging there and are the most vociferous supporters of anti Maoist campaigns


  7. Sridhar Sridhar says:

    Naxalism vs Democracy Salwa Judum vs Human Rights Police vs SPO Political judiciary vs Adivasi rightsNandini is an accomplished human rights writer Her book is based on her various field trips in the interiors of DantewadaBastarUsoor and numerous dialogues with the local communities While the debate is not new for those who are interested to read about Adivasi rights particularly Salwa Judum movement of 2005 The Burning Forest provides a detailed on ground view of the happenings The injustice helplessness and the tragedy of human lifeAt times the book does seem a bit repetitive and into far minute details like an FIR report or a personal diary of the author


  8. Kushal Kushal says:

    Very informational but a bit too wrapped up in repetitive minutiae Explores the view from the ground level in great detail but not enough from higher up


  9. Abhishek Kanna Abhishek Kanna says:

    The Burning Forest is one of the most urgent books and we all should read it It is filled with intensive research and depicts what is it like to be a tribal in Bastar But the book can be very easily be said to be representing the lives of any tribal or aboriginal population living in a mineral rich land be it the story of tribals in Africa who are consumed by the trade of blood diamonds or the tribals in our own country IndiaExtremely informative and heart wrenching book written from the perspective of the tribal communities of Bastar Gives particularly detailed information about the Salwa Judum and how it was utilized by the state to clear the grounds for big businesses to operate in the region They suffer from the hands of the state the corporates and the naxals Nandita the author has been working on tribal issues for decades now and was a part of the fact finding committee constituted by the Supreme Court to probe the excessive use of state power to oppress tribals This is a story of villages being burnt it's people being killed it's women being raped and kids who are handed guns to kill their own Puts the blame of the whole insurgency on the inability of the state to provide the tribals with their basic needs Though she does not support Maoist violence but sympathizes with their need to do something to halt the exploitation of the local populaceNandini Sundar is an anthropologist who is well versed in the history of Bastar and she bases this narrative in the historical and economic roots of the conflict It's an important book if you want to understand the nature of the civil war and the displacement of populations in central India


  10. Vijay Upadhyay Vijay Upadhyay says:

    The Burning Forest is one of the most urgent books and we all should read it It is filled with intensive research and depicts what is it like to be a tribal in Bastar But the book can be very easily be said to be representing the lives of any tribal or aboriginal population living in a mineral rich land be it the story of tribals in Africa who are consumed by the trade of blood diamonds or the tribals in our own country IndiaThey suffer from the hands of the state the corporates and the naxals Nandita the author has been working on tribal issues for decades now and was a part of the fact finding committee constituted by the Supreme Court to probe the excessive use of state power to oppress tribals This is a story of villages being burnt it's people being killed it's women being raped and kids who are handed guns to kill their own This is a testimony of Bastar though it's peopleThe only drawback of this book is as the life of every person and these are real people in this goes through similar phases as each one of them has seen the same fire and blood that it feels repetitive at times But then I think this repetition of pain is necessary for us to realise what they go through everyday and how we watch of this in impunity how we turn a blind eye to our fellow citizen to our fellow humans like an ostrich who buries its head in the sand and thinks that nothing is happening But having said that I think this book narrates such an important story that giving it anything less than 5 star is criminal


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