The Age of Bowie: How David Bowie Made a World of


The Age of Bowie: How David Bowie Made a World of Difference [Reading] ➿ The Age of Bowie: How David Bowie Made a World of Difference By Paul Morley – Thomashillier.co.uk Respected arts commentator Paul Morley, one of the team who curated the highly successful retrospective exhibition for the Victoria Albert Museum in London, David Bowie Is constructs the definitive st Respected arts commentator Paul Morley, of Bowie: MOBI ï one of the team who curated the highly successful retrospective exhibition for The Age PDF/EPUB ² the Victoria Albert Museum in London, David Bowie Is constructs the definitive story of Bowie that explores how Age of Bowie: Epub Ù he worked, played, aged, structured his ideas, invented the future and entered history as someone who could and would never be forgotten Morley will capture the greatest moments of Bowie s career from the recording studio with the likes of Brian Eno and Tony Visconti to iconic live performances from the s, s and s, as well as the various encounters and artistic relationships he developed with rock luminaries John Lennon, Lou Reed and Iggy Pop And of course, discuss in detail his much heralded, and critically acclaimed comeback with the release of Black Star just days before his shocking death in New York Morley will offer a startling biographical critique of David Bowie s legacy, showing how he never stayed still even when he withdrew from the spotlight, how he always knew his own worth, and released a dazzling plethora of mobile Bowies into the world with a bloody minded determination and a voluptuous imagination to create something amazing that was not there before This hardback book haspages and measuresxx cm.

    The Age of Bowie: How David Bowie Made a World of would never be forgotten Morley will capture the greatest moments of Bowie s career from the recording studio with the likes of Brian Eno and Tony Visconti to iconic live performances from the s, s and s, as well as the various encounters and artistic relationships he developed with rock luminaries John Lennon, Lou Reed and Iggy Pop And of course, discuss in detail his much heralded, and critically acclaimed comeback with the release of Black Star just days before his shocking death in New York Morley will offer a startling biographical critique of David Bowie s legacy, showing how he never stayed still even when he withdrew from the spotlight, how he always knew his own worth, and released a dazzling plethora of mobile Bowies into the world with a bloody minded determination and a voluptuous imagination to create something amazing that was not there before This hardback book haspages and measuresxx cm."/>
  • Paperback
  • 496 pages
  • The Age of Bowie: How David Bowie Made a World of Difference
  • Paul Morley
  • English
  • 03 January 2019
  • 1471148114

About the Author: Paul Morley

Paul Morley is an English of Bowie: MOBI ï journalist who wrote for the New Musical Express from to , The Age PDF/EPUB ² during one of its most successful periods, and has since written for a wide range of publications He Age of Bowie: Epub Ù has also has been a band manager and promoter, as well as a television presenter.



10 thoughts on “The Age of Bowie: How David Bowie Made a World of Difference

  1. James James says:

    According to Paul Morley, he chose to write the only sort of book that he could have written about Bowie part love letter, part biography, part autobiography, part theoretical framework for life He also chose to write the book in 10 weeks the idea being that this was around the same period of time that Bowie took to record some of his key 1970 s albums.This is a particularly challenging book to read as well as to reviewparticularly if, like Paul Morley, like me and like many of u According to Paul Morley, he chose to write the only sort of book that he could have written about Bowie part love letter, part biography, part autobiography, part theoretical framework for life He also chose to write the book in 10 weeks the idea being that this was around the same period of time that Bowie took to record some of his key 1970 s albums.This is a particularly challenging book to read as well as to reviewparticularly if, like Paul Morley, like me and like many of us, you are a huge fan of David Bowie.As a read, it is for the most part somewhat verbose and heavy going, it is very much a very personal and honest account of what Bowie means to Paul Morley, whilst also acknowledging that Bowie means so many very different things to so many very different people in so many very different ways it s almost written as a stream of consciousness.The book attempts to identify how Bowie changed not only himself but also how he changed the world around him and concentrates for the most part on perhaps his most influential, prolific and perhaps important period up to 1980.This is not the sort of book that you should read if A you are not a fan of BowieB you cannot appreciate the style in which Morley writes whilst I don t, many may find in pretentious and contrived in the extreme or C you are wanting to find out about Bowie, his life and work in the normal manner expected from a biography i.e in detail,often than not chronologically ordered and presented in an allegedly objective truth giving manner.As a big fan of David Bowie s work, as someone who was never lucky enough to see him perform live, but did have the privilege of seeing the fantastic David Bowie is exhibition at the VA in London in 2013 to which Morley was an artistic adviser and whilst not agreeing by any means with all of Morley s analyses which I guess is not the point I found the book very informative, fascinating, moving, challenging, satisfying, at times frustrating but ultimately definitely well worth reading Recommended if only for David Bowie fans

  2. Lucy Banks Lucy Banks says:

    At first, I wasn t so sure about this biography It seemed too focused on the author, not enough on Bowie himself.However, once it got going, it was great A really novel take on the biography format, almost veering into fiction in places, which might not be for everyone, but I personally thought it worked very well Did I learn anything new No However, I enjoyed it immensely, and in places, it made me view David Bowie in a new light I very much enjoyed it.

  3. Nigeyb Nigeyb says:

    Long time Morley admirers, and I am most definitely one, will know what to expect, this is a characteristically impressionistic biography in which he lucidly and provocatively discusses his relationship with the illusion that is David Bowie Which is your David Bowie This stunning biography will help you to make your mind up The Age of Bowie is not a conventional biography, but who wants another one of those I ve probably readthan most and, whilst it s always a good story, a rote chro Long time Morley admirers, and I am most definitely one, will know what to expect, this is a characteristically impressionistic biography in which he lucidly and provocatively discusses his relationship with the illusion that is David Bowie Which is your David Bowie This stunning biography will help you to make your mind up The Age of Bowie is not a conventional biography, but who wants another one of those I ve probably readthan most and, whilst it s always a good story, a rote chronological biography will never get to the essence of Bowie or the multifarious versions of David Bowie, as Morley has it and it is here that this refreshing and absorbing biography is so successful Morley has always been an original thinker who makes thrilling cultural connections and which, for music obsessives like me, is a joy to read You can also have your cake and eat it becauseat the end of a book about him there is only one way through his lifePaul Morley runs through each year s headline highlight.Paul Morley is both a passionate Bowie fan, and an expert, which is a winning combination Morley s meandering, confused thoughts about being asked to comment on news programmes in the aftermath of Bowie s death are worth the price of admission on their own Paul Morley was also an artistic advisor to the David Bowie Is exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum from back in 2013, and which, in late 2016, continues to tour the world I had very mixed feelings about that exhibition but there was no denying the attention to detail and rigour that went into it If anything I would have preferred an evenradical biography, one that playedfast and loose with chronology, and which brought in yetcontext and Morley s own musings on his subject The early sections dealing with Bowie s childhood and the pre fame 1960s felt a bit too conventional and, whisper it, maybe even a bit laboured That said, there are still enough of Morley s unique insights to make it worthwhile and, stay with it, because The Age of Bowie really picks up when Paul Morley gets to the 1970s or, to be exact,David Bowie s 1970s in 140 scenes featuring certain deletions, omissions and oversights .Paul Morley once again side steps the chronological approach at the end of the 1970s for afree form narrative, in which he rightly considers Bowie s work and influence in a very different context, and how it was often Bowie s extra curricular activities, collaborations, acting and other non musical work, that showed him at his most relevant and creative Bowie s albums afterLet s Danceand before Black Tie White Noise were, ahem, patchy and Morley barely mentions these albums Paul Morley has some inventive musings on the rationale for the awful Tin Machine how, if I remember right, it presages a post rock age of mediocrity where noise and empty gestures are what s coming down the line Nice try Paul Really though, what was Bowie thinking In conclusion, Paul Morley gets to the essence of Bowie farskilfully than a rote chronological biography could ever hope to achieve Paul Morley has surely written the only possible new Bowie biography anyone could want or need in 2016 and if you like Paul Morley s writing, and or you re a hardcore David Bowie fan, then I confidently predict you will love this biography That said, I have seen some very negative reviews of this biography, so proceed with caution but, for me, Bowie and Morley is a match made in heaven I loved it and look forward to reading it all over again

  4. Bettie Bettie says:

    BOTWhttp www.bbc.co.uk programmes b07m58f9Description Paul Morley was thirteen when he first heard the music of David Bowie, played late at night by DJ John Peel Before long, Bowie was taking the 1970s by storm and changing the face of pop music with his Ziggy Stardust tour, and Morley was a dedicated schoolboy fan Many years later, Morley would be an artistic advisor for the V A s acclaimed Bowie exhibition, David Bowie is , which was still attracting huge visitor numbers around the worl BOTWhttp www.bbc.co.uk programmes b07m58f9Description Paul Morley was thirteen when he first heard the music of David Bowie, played late at night by DJ John Peel Before long, Bowie was taking the 1970s by storm and changing the face of pop music with his Ziggy Stardust tour, and Morley was a dedicated schoolboy fan Many years later, Morley would be an artistic advisor for the VA s acclaimed Bowie exhibition, David Bowie is , which was still attracting huge visitor numbers around the world when Bowie died at the beginning of this year.Now, Morley has published his personal account of the life, musical influence and cultural impact of his teenage hero, exploring Bowie s constant reinvention of himself and his music over a period of five extraordinarily innovative decades Episode 1 5 Becoming Bowie In this first episode Morley describes how when he first heard Bowie s music his world suddenly became something else , and explores Bowie s childhood and his early attempts to make his name Major Tom Morley describes Bowie s move from support act to novelty hit, from acoustic whimsy tocomplex composition, and his immersion in the music, culture and artistic excitement of 1960s London Ziggy Plays Guitar Morley remembers the excitement of first seeing Bowie in concert as the Ziggy Stardust tour cut through the country trailed by headlines The Berlin Years After the fast and furious years of the late sixties and early seventies, Bowie moves to Berlin, where his music, and his life, changes once again.Shape shifters As he embraces new technology and takes on roles beyond the simply musical, Bowie steps back from the limelight until he emerges at the end of his life to stun the musical world with his final album

  5. Debra Komar Debra Komar says:

    Despite the cover photo and title, this book has NOTHING to do with David Bowie This book is about Paul Morley, who is clearly in love with his own voice and believes in using 150 words when one would do Think I m kidding Consider the following sentence He is a romantically irrational, already acutely self reflexive 23 year old, loftily rehearsing creative genius, as horny as Lucifer, a gawky manic electric obsessed with the provocative joys of juxtaposition, naturally attracted to excess an Despite the cover photo and title, this book has NOTHING to do with David Bowie This book is about Paul Morley, who is clearly in love with his own voice and believes in using 150 words when one would do Think I m kidding Consider the following sentence He is a romantically irrational, already acutely self reflexive 23 year old, loftily rehearsing creative genius, as horny as Lucifer, a gawky manic electric obsessed with the provocative joys of juxtaposition, naturally attracted to excess and outrage, anxious he might be accused of some mental infirmity, blatantly relishing the alleged thin line between mental illness and artistic creativity, between mere eccentricity and absolute delirium, understanding the instabilities of the categories of male and female, preoccupied with his own physical sensations and the tortured history of his own soul, helplessly infatuated with the highfalutin, keen on acknowledging and addressing a strange world that is not exactly reassuring, intensely fascinated by the apocalyptic, mortality and religious ecstasy, dazzled by the mongrel interconnection between human destinies, crazily ambitious to rise above mediocrity, sincerely believing that art can transform the world, beginning to follow the voice of his nature and impulses which wildly oppose prevailing laws, rules and conventions, struggling to work out how to sonically represent constantly coalescing internal perceptions and his belief, using pop music, that time is a living thing only made sense of by death One sentence, hundreds of words with absolutely no point And that is this book just an author vomiting words while saying nothing Now imagine 405 pages of this pretentious, overwrought, overwritten word vomit Simply an appalling book

  6. Laura Laura says:

    From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Paul Morley was thirteen when he first heard the music of David Bowie, played late at night by DJ John Peel Before long, Bowie was taking the 1970s by storm and changing the face of pop music with his Ziggy Stardust tour, and Morley was a dedicated schoolboy fan Many years later, Morley would be an artistic advisor for the V A s acclaimed Bowie exhibition, David Bowie is , which was still attracting huge visitor numbers around the world when Bowie died at t From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Paul Morley was thirteen when he first heard the music of David Bowie, played late at night by DJ John Peel Before long, Bowie was taking the 1970s by storm and changing the face of pop music with his Ziggy Stardust tour, and Morley was a dedicated schoolboy fan Many years later, Morley would be an artistic advisor for the VA s acclaimed Bowie exhibition, David Bowie is , which was still attracting huge visitor numbers around the world when Bowie died at the beginning of this year.Now, Morley has published his personal account of the life, musical influence and cultural impact of his teenage hero, exploring Bowie s constant reinvention of himself and his music over a period of five extraordinarily innovative decades.1 5 Becoming BowieIn this first episode Morley describes how when he first heard Bowie s music his world suddenly became something else , and explores Bowie s childhood and his early attempts to make his name.2 5 Major TomMorley describes Bowie s move from support act to novelty hit, from acoustic whimsy tocomplex composition, and his immersion in the music, culture and artistic excitement of 1960s London.3 5 Ziggy Plays GuitarMorley remembers the excitement of first seeing Bowie in concert as the Ziggy Stardust tour cut through the country trailed by headlines.4 5 The Berlin YearsAfter the fast and furious years of the late sixties and early seventies, Bowie moves to Berlin, where his music, and his life, changes once again.5 5 Shape shifterAs he embraces new technology and takes on roles beyond the simply musical, Bowie steps back from the limelight until he emerges at the end of his life to stun the musical world with his final album.Abridged and produced by Sara Davies.http www.bbc.co.uk programmes b07mm4c1

  7. Tobin Elliott Tobin Elliott says:

    I m beginning to believe it s too much to ask for someone to write a decent, coherent Bowie biography This is the second one I ve suffered through, and I don t believe I have the wherewithal to try it a third time.Is there some interesting information to be gleaned from this book Yes, but my god you have to wade through massive piles of shit, of self indulgent writing, of unending author speculation, to find it Morley never met a list he didn t like His David Bowie is lists that ran abo I m beginning to believe it s too much to ask for someone to write a decent, coherent Bowie biography This is the second one I ve suffered through, and I don t believe I have the wherewithal to try it a third time.Is there some interesting information to be gleaned from this book Yes, but my god you have to wade through massive piles of shit, of self indulgent writing, of unending author speculation, to find it Morley never met a list he didn t like His David Bowie is lists that ran about 20 25 items in the first part of the book, and serve only as filler His between X and Y comparisons His pathetic Bowie albums as astrology Am I a Low with a Ziggy Stardust rising Or a Black Tie White Noise with a Let s Dance rising.Morely overwrites, taking a significant chunk of the book s opening to beat Bowie s death to death, the takes the next three quarters of the book to get us through the mid Sixties to the end of the Seventies, then a ridiculously few yet somehow still overwritten pages to blast through the Eighties, Nineties, and right up to Blackstar and around to his death again.So, my suggestion is, stay away from this crap, and stay away from Wendy Leigh s abominable Bowie bio as well There s got to be something better out there

  8. Jo Coleman Jo Coleman says:

    Surprisingly, most of this book was actually about David Bowie, and very interesting on his early and late career, but I bloody love Paul Morley so I really enjoyed the chapters which were him writing about himself writing about David Bowie The combination of his melancholy inquisitiveness and David Bowie s restless invention was exactly what I wanted to read right now Sadly, The Laughing Gnome gets dissed again though will I ever find a rock critic who agrees that it is a towering work o Surprisingly, most of this book was actually about David Bowie, and very interesting on his early and late career, but I bloody love Paul Morley so I really enjoyed the chapters which were him writing about himself writing about David Bowie The combination of his melancholy inquisitiveness and David Bowie s restless invention was exactly what I wanted to read right now Sadly, The Laughing Gnome gets dissed again though will I ever find a rock critic who agrees that it is a towering work of greatness

  9. Chris Serafimov Chris Serafimov says:

    The Age of Bowie is not a tragic book, in any sense Paul Morley s style feels too snobish and pretentious though The first half of the book describing Bowie s pre fame life felt too long and boring at times The second part of the book documenting the times between 1970 and 1980 was okay ish, it was entertaining but contained nothing new The last part of the book documenting his post 1980 career felt too short and not detailed enough Overall, Paul Morley is an author that s not everyone s The Age of Bowie is not a tragic book, in any sense Paul Morley s style feels too snobish and pretentious though The first half of the book describing Bowie s pre fame life felt too long and boring at times The second part of the book documenting the times between 1970 and 1980 was okay ish, it was entertaining but contained nothing new The last part of the book documenting his post 1980 career felt too short and not detailed enough Overall, Paul Morley is an author that s not everyone s cup of tea, I guess Apart from that, I learned nothing new from the book and have read far better books on Bowie s art

  10. Wanda Wanda says:

    30 JUL 2016 a recommendation through Bettie Many thanks Listen here fantastic listen to Many Thanks, Bettie, this is was SUPER 30 JUL 2016 a recommendation through Bettie Many thanks Listen here fantastic listen to Many Thanks, Bettie, this is was SUPER

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