Wed Wabbit Kindle ↠ Hardcover


10 thoughts on “Wed Wabbit

  1. Karina Karina says:

    Joyously anarchic, wildly inventive and will make you laugh like a demented loon, forget that this is a children s book and just dive in and read it Imagine if Alice had met the Teletubbies, in a Monty Python show reimagining Chitty Chitty Bang Banggot that This is a bit like that, but weirder, funnier and withheart.I love, love, love this.


  2. Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks) Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks) says:

    NOTE I m really close to a milestone on my Instagram 3,000 followers and would love to reach it www.instagram.com alicetiedthebookish This is a MG novel that I honestly struggled to put down It was so bizarre, yet so adventurous with an unique story line Wed Wabbit follows young Fidge, who after having a severely bad week ends up in a world alongside a couple of talking toys and her cousin Graham To escape and return back to Earth s present day, they must rescue Fidge s younger sister NOTE I m really close to a milestone on my Instagram 3,000 followers and would love to reach it www.instagram.com alicetiedthebookish This is a MG novel that I honestly struggled to put down It was so bizarre, yet so adventurous with an unique story line Wed Wabbit follows young Fidge, who after having a severely bad week ends up in a world alongside a couple of talking toys and her cousin Graham To escape and return back to Earth s present day, they must rescue Fidge s younger sister Minnie s toy named after the story title who has gone rogue and choes amok with 3,000 Wimbley Woos, all different colours running around and only speaking in rhymes The pacing was quick, I did struggle with character connection at times but not too often I loved the world building If you are looking for a story with a strange concept, this is it


  3. Gemma Gemma says:

    I m really glad I finally got round to reading this book Its fun and hilariously funny I really do recommend it.


  4. Sarah Churchill Sarah Churchill says:

    A fun middlegrade with a young theme butadvanced language writing style, it s hard to place the target market for this Having said that it would make a great story for bedtime reading, parent and child time together It has all the classic traits of a well loved children s story traumatic event leaves enemy kids in an unknown land trying to get home There are lessons learned, friends made and lots of growth all round It s fun and whimsy, but still felt somehow lost and out of place A fun middlegrade with a young theme butadvanced language writing style, it s hard to place the target market for this Having said that it would make a great story for bedtime reading, parent and child time together It has all the classic traits of a well loved children s story traumatic event leaves enemy kids in an unknown land trying to get home There are lessons learned, friends made and lots of growth all round It s fun and whimsy, but still felt somehow lost and out of place I m not even sure that makes sense if you haven t read it I enjoyed it, but I felt like it could have been


  5. Ruth Ruth says:

    Perfect Wed Wabbit is perfect in so many ways It is about a young girl Fidge short for Iphigenia whose sister Minnie short for Minerva is injured in an accident Her mum needs to be with Minnie in the hospital, so Fidge has to stay at her aunt and uncle s house The problem is that she can t stand her difficult younger cousin, Graham.Minnie, although not physically present for the majority of the time, dominates the story She insists that Fidge repeatedly must read to her from her favour Perfect Wed Wabbit is perfect in so many ways It is about a young girl Fidge short for Iphigenia whose sister Minnie short for Minerva is injured in an accident Her mum needs to be with Minnie in the hospital, so Fidge has to stay at her aunt and uncle s house The problem is that she can t stand her difficult younger cousin, Graham.Minnie, although not physically present for the majority of the time, dominates the story She insists that Fidge repeatedly must read to her from her favourite book The Land of Wimbley Woos The Wimbley Woos are all a different colour signifying their traits and they speak in rhyme all the time Fidge hates the book obviously Minnie also has a favourite toy, a rabbit, which she must have with her constantly.Fidge s troubles begin during a thunder storm when she falls into the land of the Wimbley Woos All seems perfect at first, until Graham also arrives along with his transitional object Dr Carrot It appears that a cruel dictator has overthrown Wimbley Land Fidge and Graham need to join forces to help save the Wimbley Woos from an uncertain fate I particularly loved the way the book actually reads it is perfect for reading out loud The toy characters are vividly real and help the action along Dr Carrot and Ella the Elephant almost act as parents to Fidge and Graham, providing calm and thoughtful advice My favourite of course is Wed Wabbit, who shouts and cannot pronounce his r s, which makes for many moments of hilarity WESTLE THEM TO THE DUNGEONS AND TOMOWWOW THEY WILL FACE THE TEWWIBLE WEALITY OF THE PUNISHMENTS WOOM This book is a must for adults and children, and whilst incredibly funny, also carries a deep message about how differences must be embraced and celebrated In places, it did move me to tears I highly recommend that you read this book, I am certain it will be a modern classic.5 stars


  6. Mathew Mathew says:

    Ever since Fidge s father had died, she had not really been the same She helped out around the housethan she used to but something that settling in her which needed tackling Her little sister, Minnie, was becoming annoying and there was just something about her relationship with her mum that was distancing Worse, Fidge constantly had to read the same book about the painfully annyoing Wimbleys to her sister every night and make do with her sister s favourite toy watching her all the time Ever since Fidge s father had died, she had not really been the same She helped out around the housethan she used to but something that settling in her which needed tackling Her little sister, Minnie, was becoming annoying and there was just something about her relationship with her mum that was distancing Worse, Fidge constantly had to read the same book about the painfully annyoing Wimbleys to her sister every night and make do with her sister s favourite toy watching her all the time Wed Wabbit So when two fateful accident happens which ultimately throw Fidge into an alternate world crafted by her younger sister s imaginings, she must confront her inner demons and find her route back to who she used to be Funny and wise, Wed Wabbit exceeded my expectations There is an essence of Henson s Labyrinth in here but with a different cast one who externalises this struggle that Fidge is going through in order to try to understand her place in a family with no dad So very well done


  7. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    Well that s crazy In a great way Kinda like the movie Labyrinth but less artistic andfunny I know some kids will love it but theliteral minded might not Parents will likely appreciate the messages I esp love the message that love hugs are great healers, even of bullies Well that s crazy In a great way Kinda like the movie Labyrinth but less artistic andfunny I know some kids will love it but theliteral minded might not Parents will likely appreciate the messages I esp love the message that love hugs are great healers, even of bullies


  8. Eleanor Eleanor says:

    It was such an ordinary evening, but every detail of it would matter every detail would become vital.Lissa Evans had my heart with Old Baggage, a novel for adults about a suffragist s attempt to impart meaning to her life after the battle for the vote has been won, which came out in 2018 Seeing that Wed Wabbit was released just a year before that only increases my sense of admiration How talented do you have to be to produce not only a heartwarming, unsentimental, brilliantly angry and comple It was such an ordinary evening, but every detail of it would matter every detail would become vital.Lissa Evans had my heart with Old Baggage, a novel for adults about a suffragist s attempt to impart meaning to her life after the battle for the vote has been won, which came out in 2018 Seeing that Wed Wabbit was released just a year before that only increases my sense of admiration How talented do you have to be to produce not only a heartwarming, unsentimental, brilliantly angry and complex adult novel, but also a heartwarming, unsentimental, brilliantly angry and cacklingly hilarious children s novel, within the space of two years Pretty bloody talented.Our heroine is ten and a half year old Fidge her mother named her Iphigenia, and her little sister Minerva her father acquiesced on the condition that he be allowed to give the children unfussy nicknames, so they are Fidge and Minnie She and Minnie live with their mum Their dad, a firefighter, died of cancer or a similar terminal illness a little over a year ago, a fact with which Fidge is struggling she hasn t let anyone hug her since then Minnie, age four, is going through something of an obsessive stage her favourite animal is a stuffed red velvet lapine to whom she lispingly refers as Wed Wabbit , and her favourite book, which Fidge is obliged to read over and over again, is a nauseatingly cheery and reductive story entitled The Land of Wimbley Woos The first picture showed a group of happy looking Wimblies Each was a different colour, but they were all shaped like dustbins with large round eyes and short arms and legs, and they radiated a sort of idiotic jollity Fidge turned the page and continued reading in a bored, rapid mutterYellow are timid, Blue are strong, Grey are wise and rarely wrong Green are daring, Pink give cuddles, Orange are silly and get in muddles Purple Wimblies understand The past and future of our landWead it pwoply, with expwession, commanded Minnie.Fidge is a tough cookie, but she is looking forward, with heartbreaking intensity, to an impending outdoor activities holiday On a last minute shopping trip into town the day before, her mum s slowness combined with Minnie s need for the latest Wimbley Woos book causes them to be too late to buy the flippers that Fidge so desperately wants Mutinous with resentment, she kicks Minnie s beloved Wed Wabbit intending only to take out her frustration directly into traffic Minnie runs out after him, and well, no, it s a children s book But she is hospitalized, and Fidge now wracked with guilt sent to stay overnight with her Uncle Simon, Auntie Ruth, and cousin Graham Graham is hopeless, apparently terrified of everything and overprotected by his parents but convinced of his own superior intellect, large and pale, like a plant that has been heavily watered but kept in the dark While Fidge is there, there s a thunderstorm, and something extremely odd happens In Evans s own, deliberately hand wavey explanation, Fact when Fidge had thrown all Minnie s toys down the stairs at Graham s house, the thing that had happened next the huge soundless static explosion must have somehow churned them together, and who knew what mightYes Fidge, and Graham, and all of Minnie s toys including a pink and purple elephant named Ella and a bright pink diamant mobile phone that makes a very annoying sound when it rings , and Graham s transitional object a plastic promotional carrot from a supermarket, which his rather dippy parents are hoping will serve as a locus for all of his fears and help him cope with change , are in The Land of the Wimbley Woos And not just in a generic sense, either they are, specifically, in Minnie s copy, and therefore in Minnie s version of Wimbley Land The Purple Wimblies, upon all of which she has drawn moustaches in felt tip in her copy of the book, are moustachioed here Muchproblematic, though, is the fact that Wed Wabbit is also in the book and here, in what is clearly some corner of Minnie s fearful and confused psyche, he is extremely powerful In fact, he has overthrown the Wimbley King who doesn t mind, mostly because his greatest ambition is to be left alone , and established himself as a vast literally everything is bigger in Wimbley Land, so Wed Wabbit is about twenty feet tall and terrifying dictator.Well, terrifying to the Wimbley Woos, anyway When Graham and Fidge first meet this tyrannical incarnation of Wed Wabbit, the inherent ridiculousness of the situation brings them together for the first time WIMBLEY LAND HAS BEEN WUN IN A WEGWETTABLE WAY, BUT NOW THE TIME OF WECKONING HAS COME,WEQUIWING A BWEAK FWOM THE PAST AND A CWACK DOWN ON TWEATS AND WELAXATION IT WILL TAKE AN EXTWEMELY STWONG STWUGGLE TO WIGHT THESE WONGS AND I Graham let out a huge snort, and Fidge found she couldn t hold back any longer and they were suddenly both yelping with helpless, uncontrollable laughter Graham doubled up, Fidge with tears actually running down her cheeks Wed Wabbit speaks in 62 point all caps In order to depose Wed Wabbit, Fidge and Graham plus Ella, the carrot who demands to be referred to as Dr Carrot , despite Graham pointing out that the DR printed on her base stands for Douglas Retail , the name of the shop where the vegetable promotion was occurring , a plucky Pink Wimbly and a somewhat long winded Grey Wimbly must bring all the Wimblies together to take out the Blues, who serve as castle guards.Honestly, I m nearly 1000 words into the review and we ve just about sorted the meat of the plot Wed Wabbit pretty much defies description in that regard, but in the best possible way It is an intensely weird premise and there is no point in pretending it is not but then, Evans knows, and is entirely uninterested in, its level of weirdness The mechanism by which Fidge, Graham and the toys get into Minnie s book much less get out again is never explained and hardly dwelt upon Wed Wabbit isn t about believable world building it s about using the structure of a quest narrative free Wimbley Land from tyranny to intelligently parallel an arc of internal emotional development Both Fidge and Graham need to let go of something that is holding them captive Fidge, her refusal to give or receive hugs which here are metonyms for affection and the vulnerability that comes with being demonstrative , and Graham, his terror of everything and his belief in the superiority of intellect above pragmatism or kindness Both of them, in other words, have their own Wed Wabbits lurking in their hearts.For the most part this is fairly subtly done at least, I imagine a ten year old wouldn t necessarily twig There is one moment, I think, where Evans slightly overplays it But why asked Graham What does he get out of it OK, so he s the boss and the whole country s terrified of him, and everyone rushes about obeying his orders, but he s stuck in the castle, he never gets out, he never does anything or talks to anyone or has any fun or He suddenly became aware that Dr Carrot was looking at him in a significant wayWhathe asked defensively You re not trying to say that s like me, are you Why, yes, yes indeed.Fidge s turn, when it comes, is better managed having done what they believe necessary to defeat Wed Wabbit, she realizes one final thing is in order, and reluctantly hugs him Instantly, he shrinks, colour returns to Wimbley Land amongst other things, he has been draining everything to white , and good governance is restored Not, mind you, by the re installation of the Wimbley King The Oldest and Wisest of the Grey Wimblies, who has by now learned the art of brevity, is elected ruler in his stead Fidge and Graham s personal quests, though a hook to hang the rest of the book from, are not really the funny bits Those are mostly to do with the Wimblies, who can only communicate in the singsong rhyme scheme of their book, and whose self conceptions are entirely based around the assumption that each color Wimbly is only good at one thing This is, in fact, key to the strategy that ends up overthrowing Wed Wabbit, but I won t spoil everything for you The rhyming provides almost infinite opportunities for wit, and Evans takes full advantage of them The Wimbley King s apathy, for instance, is delightfully articulated by the fact that he frequently can t be bothered to think of end rhymes Sorry, I didn t hear your question This muesli s rather good Bim bestion When Wimbley Land is freed, it s not just from Wed Wabbit, but from the shackles of trochaic tetrameter A Pink Wimbly thanks Fidge in the structure of a limerick But it s us who can t thank you enough We know that your journey s been rough For such a brave fight Your talents were right You re clever and stubborn and tough It wasn t just me, said Fidge A Purple with green blotches clapped Graham on the back One straw is so weak, it bellowed But take and weave a handful Such strength together That didn t rhyme, said Fidge Blank verse, said Ella I think, actually, it s a haiku The strength of Wed Wabbit, therefore, isn t necessarily in its plot even though describing it takes ages and sounds quite mad, it s in the service of a not so unusual story, about how to find strength at moments when you feel weak, about how to make friends and move through fear Where it shines is in its complete dedication to being batshit, its ability to convince us that yes, of course, a four year old s idea of a terrible dungeon would indeed include squashy bananas and warm milk with a skin on it, because those are the things she hates That s what makes it, not just a good children s book, but a good book, like Pixar doesn t just make good movies for kids but good movies in general In fact, I d quite like to see Pixar adapt this


  9. Eleanor (bookishcourtier) Eleanor (bookishcourtier) says:

    2018 CARNEGIE LONGLIST BOOK 10 20 Let s face it, I never thought I would love this book However, I did not expect to be so intensely irritated by a book that I wanted to throw it against a wall and start pounding my head on the ground Literally the moment I finished this I took big gulps of relieved breaths because I was so glad to get out That irritation has literally masked my whole opinion of this book and I could literally not rate it higher, even if I wanted to Looking past the horrib 2018 CARNEGIE LONGLIST BOOK 10 20 Let s face it, I never thought I would love this book However, I did not expect to be so intensely irritated by a book that I wanted to throw it against a wall and start pounding my head on the ground Literally the moment I finished this I took big gulps of relieved breaths because I was so glad to get out That irritation has literally masked my whole opinion of this book and I could literally not rate it higher, even if I wanted to Looking past the horrible cover they need to change that, it isn t very appealing , this book is about a girl called Fidge who has an annoying younger sister who reads this book called the Land of the Wimbley Woos She also has lots of toys, inclduing a purple elephant and a wed wabbit When the younger sister is involved in a car accident, Fidge has to go and stay with her horrible cousin, Graham, and ends up getting stuck in a world which is a weird combination of her sister s favourite book, her cuddley toys, with Wed Wabbit as an evil dictator In this world, there are colourful dustbin shaped creatures called wimbleys and and I just can t do it any As you have probably noticed, this book is complete and utter nonsense I hated it The world was babyish and so sillyBut Eleanor,you say,this is a children s book It s supposed to be like thatAh no, no, no, no, no, no, here is my problem It was written well enough for older kids BUT I feel like older kids would have lost patience with this just like me, and younger children would not be able to read it I feel like this is one of those books which is aimed at critics who will then praise it for children I think some authors need to think about what audience they are aiming at, and when writing children s books, we need to think about what children will really enjoy I cannot rate this any higher, for reasons that you have read already, but there were SOME things that I would have liked about it had it not been set in the most annoying world ever I liked some of the things Ella said, they were funny but positive, and I kind of liked how Graham became nicer But it was just against such a nonsense and annoying background that all the good things just sort ofpaled Which is sad, because there were some elements buried in here that I think people would enjoy So, despite the good reviews, this was a no from me I just don t like to read about creatures that can t pronounce their w and I cannot deal with talking dustbins This didn t really have an audience who would fully appreciate it either the writing style was too complex for really young children who would like the genre, I think And I just don t know why anyone would want to read about something this intensely annoying


  10. Fred Fred says:

    Wed Wabbit by Lisa Evans has been shortlisted alongside seven other books for the 2018 Carnegie Medal I have already written reviews of Rook and Beyond the Bright Sea, two other nominees The Carnegie is a literary prize based in the UK which focuses on recently published fiction for children and teenagers Even though this is not an age range I read at, I read and review this shortlist every year with others and then put my reviews up on Goodreads.I must say, throughout my group, Wed Wabbit w Wed Wabbit by Lisa Evans has been shortlisted alongside seven other books for the 2018 Carnegie Medal I have already written reviews of Rook and Beyond the Bright Sea, two other nominees The Carnegie is a literary prize based in the UK which focuses on recently published fiction for children and teenagers Even though this is not an age range I read at, I read and review this shortlist every year with others and then put my reviews up on Goodreads.I must say, throughout my group, Wed Wabbit was the one which everyone seemed to dread, due to a few people having reviewed it and slated it, to the point where it is almost being treated as either the book to get over and done with or as the book to just avoid Amusingly, it has quite an infamous reputation throughout the group as being a bit dire.Having now read this book myself within a day in as much of an unbiased way as possible, I am pleased to say that I am not COMPLETELY secured in that camp of devoted haters I gave the book 2.5 out of 5 stars for what it is worth I have recently found that my ratings on Goodreads don t really mean anything given that it is such an arbitrary system But regardless of that, I think the amount of negative hype surrounding this book is a little bit of a disservice towards it and it certainly does have some merit to it.Certainly, prior to reading it, there were lots of things about this book that did not appeal to me and were still not appealing to me during the reading experience However, something that I did VERY much like about this book was that it had lots of little acknowledgements to The Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, two books I like a lot It definitely is quite a UNIQUE adaptation of those two books but they are definitely there For me, this was a blend between those two books simply with the target age reduced enormously This book follows a girl named Fidge and her younger sister Minnie Minnie is very attached to all her toy rabbits, the favourite of which is called Wed Wabbit , and she constantly asks Fidge to read aloud all her pop up picture books based on these toys the books focus on the Wimbley Woos who live in Wimbley Land under the rule of Wed Wabbit The family are due to go on holiday and the morning before their departure, Minnie gets run over by a car and is swiftly sent to hospital Fidge descends into a severe depressionbut then when she goes down into the cellar of her aunt s house in order to get Minnie s toys from that place, she loses consciousnessand then wakes up in Wimbley Land , the home to the Wimbly Woos, ruled by the fearsome Wed Wabbit Very similar in this way to The Wizard of Oz travelling to a faraway land which resembles elements of the real world If you are planning to read this book, one has to prepare to overlook the quite bizarre plot I even felt a bit ridiculous explaining it then, let alone reading it and look instead at the wider subtext and themes Something that I really appreciated about this was the following Fidge feels very guilty about what has happened to her sister because she kicked Minnie s toy, Wed Wabbit, into the road and that is why Minnie ran out in front of a car Therefore, in Fidge s extreme decline and self anguish, she suddenly ends up in her sister s world because she thinks that she has potentially killed her sister, her mind completely immerses her in a world her sister used to love By doing so, she can potentially find or help her sister again One of the people in my reviewing group said that the hidden subtext was this instead of genuinely travelling to another world, Fidge is in fact having a nervous breakdown due to feeling guilty and heavily missing her sister This book is very much open to different interpretations as to whether or not Wimbley Woo land is real or not, a connection with Alice in Wonderland Therefore, part of this story is about acceptance after Fidge is initially very sceptical towards Minnie s toys and stories, she eventually learns to accept them and happily go along with them for the sake of her sister Due to how her not doing this led to Minnie s accident, followed by how crucial Minnie s information was to her when she was in Wimbley Land, this moral lesson is very present by the end of the book.Another recurring theme is moving on and growing up again, both The Wizard of Oz and Alice s Adventures in Wonderland have similar themes Fidge grows up by moving away from her scepticism and moody nature towards Minnie s stories Minnie however also grows up a lot in this story Towards the end of the book, Fidge asks Minnie oh where s Wed Wabbit and she replies saying that he was staying behind today in the bedroom to tidy up Fidge just smiles and thinks that happens, things change , which shows both how she has matured AND how children mature naturally and we only need to accept that.So I really appreciated all of the above references to other literature, lots of subtext, and the openness to different interpretation.However, I would not recommend this book to EVERYBODY Counter intuitively, I wouldn t actually recommend this book to somebody of my reading tastes I would not pick this book up in a bookshop and I don t regret having that attitude, despite the positive stuff I have said about it.The reason for all of this is because the target audience is very young it is a book written for, I would say, people between the ages of 9 13 I completely understand why it is on the Carnegie Shortlist and, unlike many other people I know, I would not be sad at all if this won However, in comparison with other Carnegie nominees, it is for a very young age group Rook, for example, I would recommend to people of 13 years The Hate U Give is a really intense read and the polar opposite of Wed Wabbit In comparison, therefore, with other books on the same shortlist, it is surprisingly for a much younger audience However, I would not dismiss this book If you know a young person who would enjoy this book, I would recommend it It is really interesting in terms of the messages behind it and it is quite a fun book for a young person to read There is also quite a lot of problem solving in it, just in case you are into that A book I would not slate in the slightest.Overall, for young people, it gets a thumbs up


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Wed Wabbit [Epub] ➚ Wed Wabbit Author Lissa Evans – Thomashillier.co.uk You re called Fidge and you re nearly eleven You ve been hurled into a strange world You have three companions two are unbelievably weird and the third is your awful cousin GrahamYou have to solve a s You re called Fidge and you re nearly eleven You ve been hurled into a strange world You have three companions two are unbelievably weird and the third is your awful cousin GrahamYou have to solve a series of nearly impossible cluesYou need to deal with a cruel dictator and three thousand Wimbley Woos yes, you read that sentence correctly And the whole situation the whole, entire thing is your faultWed Wabbit is an adventure story about friendship, danger and the terror of never being able to get back home again.

    Free Unlimited eBook cluesYou need to deal with a cruel dictator and three thousand Wimbley Woos yes, you read that sentence correctly And the whole situation the whole, entire thing is your faultWed Wabbit is an adventure story about friendship, danger and the terror of never being able to get back home again."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 243 pages
  • Wed Wabbit
  • Lissa Evans
  • English
  • 15 August 2019
  • 1910989436

About the Author: Lissa Evans

After a brief career in medicine, and an even briefer one in stand up, Lissa Evans became a comedy producer, first in radio and then in television Her first novel, Spencer s List, was published in , and since then she has written threebooks for adults two of them longlisted for the Orange Baileys Prize and two for children the first of them shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal Her two most recent books for adults were set in London during the Second World War one of them, Their Finest Hour and a Half has now been made into a film entitled Their Finest , starring Gemma Arterton, Sam Claflin and Bill Nighy.