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Psmith, Journalist ➪ Psmith, Journalist Read ➲ Author P.G. Wodehouse – Thomashillier.co.uk The story begins with Psmith accompanying his fellow Cambridge student Mike to New York on a cricketing tour Through high spirits and force of personality, Psmith takes charge of a minor periodical, a The story begins with Psmith accompanying his fellow Cambridge student Mike to New York on a cricketing tour Through high spirits and force of personality, Psmith takes charge of a minor periodical, and becomes imbroiled in a scandal involving slum landlords, boxers and gangsters the story displays a strong social conscience, rare in Wodehouse s generally light harted works Psmith, Journalist was first released in the UK as a serial in the magazine The Captain inIt was then published, in substantially rewritten form, under the title The Prince and Betty by WJWatt and Co New York on February ,The original text of Psmith, Journalist was finally published in book form in the UK on September by Adam Charles Black, London.


10 thoughts on “Psmith, Journalist

  1. Pramod Nair Pramod Nair says:

    Psmith, Journalist by P.G Wodehouse, which was published in the book form in 1915, is the third book in a series featuring the adventures of Psmith , one of the best loved characters in the Wodehousian world Following the true form of narration, plot and character development that is signature of Wodehouse, Psmith, Journalist is a novel that can charm the reader with its merry adventure and hilarious situations Rupert Psmith or Ronald Eustace Psmith the P, which according to him is silent Psmith, Journalist by P.G Wodehouse, which was published in the book form in 1915, is the third book in a series featuring the adventures of Psmith , one of the best loved characters in the Wodehousian world Following the true form of narration, plot and character development that is signature of Wodehouse, Psmith, Journalist is a novel that can charm the reader with its merry adventure and hilarious situations Rupert Psmith or Ronald Eustace Psmith the P, which according to him is silent as in pshrimpis a dandy, silver tongued monocle wearing gentleman, who often gets embroiled in the most silly and hilarious state of affairs His ability to disentangle himself from such situations by confusing his opponents through conversations makes him a fascinating character.In Psmith, Journalist , we find Psmith accompanying Mike Jackson his close friend, sidekick and a cricket player to New York on a cricketing tour When Mike is busy with his cricket matches, Psmith find New York, a quiet, self respecting town like London, which makes him pretty bored But in the Wodehousian world things are never boring, so a chance encounter that he has with Billy Windsor , the acting editor of the magazine Cosy Moments , changes things upside down for Psmith In the familiar Wodehousian fashion things start to go quiet chaotic after this meeting resulting in incredibly humorous circumstances that can make the reader chuckle in delight Attempts by Psmith and Billy to address some social issues through the magazine results in a flurry of intertwined incidents involving gangsters, rival gangsters and crooked politicians leading to hilariously complex happenings that only Wodehouse can come up with The way in which a supremely self confident Psmith handle each of these situations with his comical dialogs and a touch of eccentricity keeps the excitement level pretty high throughout the book.Along with some of the best instances of the sharp wit, Wodehouse also paints the sights and sounds of New York from the early 1900s with great clarity through his narratives in Psmith, Journalist Altogether a funny, lightweight book perfect for relaxed reading


  2. Glenn Russell Glenn Russell says:

    Cliff Dwellers by George Bellows The unchallenged master of English prose, P G Wodehouse often shows a fair working knowledge of Marxist theory So proclaims Christopher Hitchens in his essay, Marx s Journalism, The Grub Street Years, where specific references are made to Wodehouse s Psmith, Journalist This essay by the unchallenged modern master of the English snarl prompted me to seek out Psmith, Journalist, the novel containing the beloved British author s strongest social commentary Ps Cliff Dwellers by George Bellows The unchallenged master of English prose, P G Wodehouse often shows a fair working knowledge of Marxist theory So proclaims Christopher Hitchens in his essay, Marx s Journalism, The Grub Street Years, where specific references are made to Wodehouse s Psmith, Journalist This essay by the unchallenged modern master of the English snarl prompted me to seek out Psmith, Journalist, the novel containing the beloved British author s strongest social commentary Psmith, Journalist Eton College gentility meets American mauling mauling of civility, mauling of one s rivals, mauling of the King s English The novel s humor sparkles on each and every page The prime reason for the book s humor is all in the contrast assuming the role of a New York City magazine editor, Psmith, Eton and Cambridge man, an unflappable gent withthan a touch of Reginald like wit and eccentricity reading the novel I was frequently reminded of Saki s delightful aristocratic aesthete , maintains his manner and speech when dealing with such as gangsters and boxers as if conversing with his Cambridge chums over tea and crumpets As by way of example, here s Psmith outlining his vision to Billy Windsor, acting editor of Cozy Moments, a small magazine devoted to providing family entertainment Assuredly, said Psmith And now to decide upon our main scheme You, of course, are the editor, and my suggestions are merely suggestions, subject to your approval But, briefly, my idea is that Cosy Moments should become red hot stuff I could wish its tone to be such that the public will wonder why we do not print it on asbestos We must chronicle all the live events of the day, murders, fires, and the like in a manner which will make our readers spines thrill Above all, we must be the guardians of the People s rights We must be a search light, showing up the dark spot in the souls of those who would endeavour in any way to do the PEOPLE in the eye We must detect the wrong doer, and deliver him such a series of resentful buffs that he will abandon his little games and become a model citizen The details of the campaign we must think out after, but I fancy that, if we follow those main lines, we shall produce a bright, readable little sheet which will in a measure make this city sit up and take notice Are you with me, Comrade Windsor Notice Psmith addresses Billy Windsor as Comrade In high minded socialist, Marxist spirit during his New York sojourn, Psmith calls all his interlocutors Comrade Shortly after Psmith convinces Billy Windsor to join him in striking out on a new vision for Cozy Moments the current editor in chief, Mr Wilberfloss, is off in the mountains for ten weeks , Psmith encounters abominable Lower East Side tenement buildings on Pleasant Street ah, the irony of the name, P G Wodehouse It was indeed a repellent neighbourhood in which they had arrived The New York slum stands in a class of its own It is unique The height of the houses and the narrowness of the streets seem to condense its unpleasantness All the smells and noises, which are many and varied, are penned up in a sort of canyon, and gain in vehemence from the fact The masses of dirty clothes hanging from the fire escapes increase the depression Nowhere in the city does one realise so fully the disadvantages of a lack of space New York, being an island, has had no room to spread It is a town of human sardines In the poorer quarters the congestion is unbelievable Now our British gent has his star cause bring this wretched squalor to the public s attention so as to force the tenement owner to provide sanitary, livable housing for these poor men, women and children And that s exactly what Psmith and Billy Windsor do The next issues of Cozy Moments cause a stir the circulation skyrockets Predictably, the unnamed, unknown landlord hires thugs and gangsters to force Cozy Moments to discontinue its relentless slam How do Psmith and Billy respond A battle cry for the integrity of journalism Cozy Moments cannot not be muzzled Thus we have the tale s lively framework which leads to a number of hilarious scenes not the least of which is Psmith and Billy at a boxing match where our Eton man offers many piquant observations, such as It seems to me, Comrade Windsor, he said, that this merry meeting looks like doing Comrade Brady no good I should not be surprised at any moment to see his head bounce off on to the floor In a similar vein, by way of his third person narrator, P G Wodehouse s excitement watching the boxing match reaches a high pitch The Cyclone now became stillcyclonic He had a left arm which seemed to open out in joints like a telescope Several times when the Kid appeared well out of distance there was a thud as a brown glove ripped in over his guard and jerked his head back But always he kept boring in, delivering an occasional right to the body with the pleased smile of an infant destroying a Noah s Ark with a tack hammer Despite these efforts, however, he was plainly getting all the worst of it Energetic Mr Wolmann, relying on his long left, was putting in three blows to his one When the gong sounded, ending the first round, the house was practically solid for the Cyclone Whoops and yells rose from everywhere The building rang with shouts of, Oh, you Al Readers of the novel will enjoy many similar descriptions What a rousing tale If anybody has the misguided notion P G Wodehouse restricted himself to stories about characters like Jeeves and Wooster, Psmith, Journalist will be an eye opener Closing note American artist George Bellows two paintings included here are from the same time period as Psmith, Journalist As a matter of fact, these two painting could very well have been illustrations for P G s novel The Knockout by George BellowsBritish author P G Wodehouse, 1881 1975 I am Psmith, said the old Etonian reverently There is a preliminary P before the name This, however, is silent Like the tomb Compare such words as ptarmigan, psalm, and phthisis P.G Wodehouse, Psmith, Journalist


  3. Antonomasia Antonomasia says:

    I m not one of those who automatically turn to Wodehouse for comfort reading But I needed to finish some book, and Psmith, Journalist was the first one I came to which fitted these criteria I would feel like I d achieved something by reading it It s on the BBC 2019 Novels that Shaped Our World list Having read it, I d guess it was a teenage favourite of a panellist, because it s harder to imagine loving this story if reading it first time in middle age Yet it also seemed relatively inc I m not one of those who automatically turn to Wodehouse for comfort reading But I needed to finish some book, and Psmith, Journalist was the first one I came to which fitted these criteria I would feel like I d achieved something by reading it It s on the BBC 2019 Novels that Shaped Our World list Having read it, I d guess it was a teenage favourite of a panellist, because it s harder to imagine loving this story if reading it first time in middle age Yet it also seemed relatively inconsequential, and I wouldn t feel I had to think deeply about it and pore over every word People don t talk about it much, apart from that BBC list, and only 3 GR friends have even shelved it It was written and set at a time when people were used to serious infectious disease published 1915 short It passed the time amicably enough, but I found a lot of it very silly, and not in the best way The wrong sort of fantasy An ambitious reporter in maybe his mid twenties, stuck working for a magazine not unlike the People s Friend, befriends a couple of rich foreign 20 year olds he meets in a bar and lets one of them turn the magazine into an investigative journalism and sports outlet This would all sound a lot of fun if you were reading it aged 14 or something I d guess whichever BBC panellists loved it discovered it as teenagers , but if you re twice Psmith s age and reading this for the first time, it s less believable than a bunch of wizards, elves and talking animals The Noo Yawk gangsters speech looks to me, a 21st century Britlike a mixture of Chicago and the way African American speech used to be written by white writers 100 years ago Generally, the Americans are all stereotypes and I imagined them as Hanna Barbera cartoons I m not sure whether it would help or hinder enjoyment of the novel to havebackground knowledge than merely having seen the film Gangs of New York 18 years ago but I d love to know what someone who knew a lot about these gangs thought of Psmith, Journalist Psmith perhaps it stands out because no other character talks like him has that jovial, ornate unintentional pomposity now found mostly in middle aged geek goth men who wear Terry Pratchett hats with long coats, were into real ale long before it was fashionable, and are serious about Linux or swords, or sometimes both I often quite like these people however when they appear in fiction it is usually as figures of fun I suppose I can t quite place Psmith I don t understand how he s supposed to seem to his contemporaries and he feels incongruous now I preferred him in Leave It to Psmith where, being slightly older and an assistant to elder characters, he seemed less ridiculous Old Etonians winging it with their harebrained schemes Psmith is one have become less of a fun subject for quite a lot of people in Britain over the last few years There is something a little too frustratingly easy in the way Psmith solves a big problem by being very rich and buying his way out of it The structure is odd sometimes There isn t a detailed scene about preparing the crucial new first issue, the nerves as it goes to press, its reception etc, as you would expect from a story about journalism It often feels unclear how much time has elapsed, and there isn t enough info about what is in subsequent issues of the mag It feels as if it was a draft where the author had thought he d go back and write those bits later because he didn t feel inspired on the first couple of goes.On the plus side It is curious and interesting to see Wodehouse writing about social issues namely slum landlords, corruption in local politics and the police albeit in the USA and Psmith stands up against other characters who denigrate others based on ethnic stereotypes This is back when Italian Americans, Irish Americans etc were still ethnic There are a few historically revealing details, such as the urban gangsters mostly being stunted inevitably one imagines the Ant Hill Mob , whilst guys from the midwest are strapping and healthy.However the cartoonish nature of many of the characters, who feltpredictable and less rounded than Wodehouse s usual array of English gentry, takes away from all this a little It is kind of Famous Five do journalism , with grown up level crime stakes That may sound good or bad, and I think it soundsfun in retrospect than it was to read at the time It is all very genial and wraps up nicely all s well that ends well, as so many readers want from Wodehouse.This could have been a lot worse and I am still happy to have read it But I am concludingandthat the only Wodehouse I really enjoy is the Blandings series read reviewed late March 2020


  4. Dan Schwent Dan Schwent says:

    I d start a paper just to get Psmith working on it.


  5. Hákon Gunnarsson Hákon Gunnarsson says:

    Actually he doesn t become a journalist in this book, but he does get involved with the running of a paper with the delightful name, Cozy Moments Psmith with a silent P is not my favorite Wodehouse character, but he certainly isn t the worst of them either He has a certain elegance.The story is in the usual Wodehouse style The whole thing is slightly redicilous, but funny I keep coming back to Wodehouse for a reason It is not that reinvented anything in literature, it s that he could turn Actually he doesn t become a journalist in this book, but he does get involved with the running of a paper with the delightful name, Cozy Moments Psmith with a silent P is not my favorite Wodehouse character, but he certainly isn t the worst of them either He has a certain elegance.The story is in the usual Wodehouse style The whole thing is slightly redicilous, but funny I keep coming back to Wodehouse for a reason It is not that reinvented anything in literature, it s that he could turn out a funny situations, a funny story, memorable characters, and this book has that For some reason, his humor doesn t age badly, like some humorous stories from that time I can t see that at least, and I can t really explain why either Who cares anyway It s enough for me that he makes me smile He isn t political in his stories, but this one borders on it While Psmith is at Cozy Moments the paper goes after a slum lord and shows the corruption that lurks around him It s one of the rare occasions where Wodehouse shows that aspect in his stories Anyway, not the best Wodehouse, but still funny


  6. Leslie Leslie says:

    4.5 Psuke Bariah did a very good narration of this 3rd book in the Psmith series In this one, Psmith s friend Mike is on the fringes of the story Mike s cricket team has come to the U.S and Psmith has accompanied him but is at rather loose ends in New York City while Mike is away playing He befriends a young newspaper man and gets interested in journalism While Psmith is his typical self, this entry in the series hasobvious social commentary than most Wodehouse books and less sillines 4.5 Psuke Bariah did a very good narration of this 3rd book in the Psmith series In this one, Psmith s friend Mike is on the fringes of the story Mike s cricket team has come to the U.S and Psmith has accompanied him but is at rather loose ends in New York City while Mike is away playing He befriends a young newspaper man and gets interested in journalism While Psmith is his typical self, this entry in the series hasobvious social commentary than most Wodehouse books and less silliness I find it a bit sad that many of the problems described in this book still exist over 100 years later gangs, slums, corruption


  7. Chris Chris says:

    This is Wodehouse s third Psmith book, published in the US in 1912 and the UK in 1915, and thus Wodehouse s 18th published novel However, it was written in 1909, after his very first visit to America, which lasted from April 25th to May 20th 1904, and allowed him a glimpse of New York street gangs and the boxing scene Into this turn of the century New York he inserts, somewhat improbably, his then best comic creation, the loquacious, audacious, monocle wearing Psmith, a kind of foppish adventu This is Wodehouse s third Psmith book, published in the US in 1912 and the UK in 1915, and thus Wodehouse s 18th published novel However, it was written in 1909, after his very first visit to America, which lasted from April 25th to May 20th 1904, and allowed him a glimpse of New York street gangs and the boxing scene Into this turn of the century New York he inserts, somewhat improbably, his then best comic creation, the loquacious, audacious, monocle wearing Psmith, a kind of foppish adventurer a strange character which really doesn t fit any preexisting literary or social stereotype Psmith really is a strange literary figure, given to prolonged displays of elocution and keen observation in potentially dangerous situations, as though merely continuing to talk and perplex aggressors will get him out of the situation This is early Wodehouse which lacks the brilliant playfulness with language which he was to develop within a few years and hone for the rest of his career, but there are entertaining glimpses of an incipient master becoming aware of his powers to tweak the language to such piquant and endearing effect which Wodehouse was known and loved for Well worth it for Psmith fans and Wodehouse completists.In case you re wondering, the Psmith series is Mike serialized and published 1909 Psmith in the City serialized 1909, published 1910 Psmith, Journalist serialized 1909, published 1912 US, 1915 UK Leave it to Psmith serialized 1923, published 1923 UK, 1924 US


  8. Melissa Melissa says:

    The cry goes round Cambridge It s the Gangs of New York by Wodehouse I fear that you have allowed constant communication with the conscienceless commercialism of this worldly city to undermine your moral sense It is useless to dangle rich bribes before our eyes Cosy Moments cannot be muzzled From the hills of Maine to the Everglades of Florida, from Sandy Hook to San Francisco, from Portland Oregon, to Melonsquashville, Tennessee, one sentence is in every man s mouth And what is tha The cry goes round Cambridge It s the Gangs of New York by Wodehouse I fear that you have allowed constant communication with the conscienceless commercialism of this worldly city to undermine your moral sense It is useless to dangle rich bribes before our eyes Cosy Moments cannot be muzzled From the hills of Maine to the Everglades of Florida, from Sandy Hook to San Francisco, from Portland Oregon, to Melonsquashville, Tennessee, one sentence is in every man s mouth And what is that sentence I give you three guesses You give it up It is this Cosy Moments cannot be muzzled


  9. Harish Challapalli Harish Challapalli says:

    Not a great book This book has lesser humor quotient when compared with the other two in the series At times, i felt very miserable and blindly skipped few pages till i find a new chapter But Psmith, as always, a graceful character has enlighted the plot with his wit and charm The narraation was very dull Til the entry of psmith, i checked many times, if i am reading Psmith series or something else Very pathetic opening This is a bad work from Mr Wodehouse A fan like me, never expe Not a great book This book has lesser humor quotient when compared with the other two in the series At times, i felt very miserable and blindly skipped few pages till i find a new chapter But Psmith, as always, a graceful character has enlighted the plot with his wit and charm The narraation was very dull Til the entry of psmith, i checked many times, if i am reading Psmith series or something else Very pathetic opening This is a bad work from Mr Wodehouse A fan like me, never expect such messy work from him I hope the next and last part of the series would be better


  10. Meave Meave says:

    Cosy Moments cannot be muzzled Could you dream up aridiculously, wonderfully assonant name for a muckraking paper than Cosy Moments I d give it five stars for being about journalism and doing away with the cricket, except dear Wodehouse replaces the pages and pages of wickets with pages and pages of authentic New York street tough dialect, which is really awful, and tosses in a spoonful of racism for relish Boo It s no Thank You, Jeeves, but that one really stands alone.


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