The Arabian Nights ePUB ✓ The Arabian PDF or

The Arabian Nights ➧ [Ebook] ➢ The Arabian Nights By testing testing ➲ – Thomashillier.co.uk The Arabian Nights, un film de Chuck RussellThe Arabian Nights, un film de Chuck Russell Synopsis Ali Baba, jeune soldat, s allie Aladdin, son gnie et Sinbad pour sauver la princesse Sheherazade et so The Arabian Nights, un film de Chuck RussellThe Arabian Nights, un film de Chuck Russell Synopsis Ali Baba, jeune soldat, s allie Aladdin, son gnie et Sinbad pour sauver la princesse Sheherazade et son royaume de forces obscuresThe Arabian Nights A Companion IrwinThe Arabian Nights has become a synonym for the fabulous and the exotic Every child is familiar with the stories of Aladdin, The Arabian PDF or Sinbad the Sailor and Ali Baba Yet very few people, even specialists in oriential literature, have a clear idea of when the book was written or what exactly it is Far from being a batch of stories for children, The Arabian Nights contains hundreds of narratives ofOne Thousand and One Nights WikipediaThe Thousand and One Nights Summary, Themes, The Thousand and One Nights, also called The Arabian Nights, Arabic Alf laylah wa laylah, collection of largely Middle Eastern and Indian stories of uncertain date and authorship Its tales of Aladdin , Ali Baba , and Sindbad the Sailor have almost become part of Western folklore , though these were added to the collection only in the th century in European adaptations The Arabian Nights Candlelight Stories The Arabian Nights also known as TheArabian Nights have inspired writers the world over with the ancient power of story There are versions of these stories in many languages and they all convey the great sense of adventure, truth, fantastic imagination, justice, and faith embodied by the great civilizations that contributed stories and ideas to the collection The Arabian NightsPDF The Arabian Nights Tales ofNights, Free download or read online The Arabian Nights Tales ofNights, Volumepdf ePUB book The first edition of the novel was published in , and was written by Anonymous The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists ofpages and is available in Paperback format The main characters of this classics, fiction story are , Flipper Tales of The Arabian Nights Williams Le flipper Tales of The Arabian Nights de Willams emmne les joueurs danscontes des Mille et Une Nuits qui incluent un voyage autour de l ancienne ville de Bagdad, volant sur un tapis magique et luttant contre le gnie malfique Gadget principal du flipper une lampe magique que l on peut faire tourner avec la bille Il dispose aussi deaimants et peut faire disparaitre la billeArabian Knights TV SeriesIMDb With Paul Frees, Frank Gerstle, Shari Lewis, Jay North A fugitive Arabian prince fights his villainous usurper as the leader of a special team of adventures Ali of The Arabian Nights Crossword Clue, The Crossword Solver foundanswers to the Ali of The Arabian Nights crossword clue The Crossword Solver finds answers to American style crosswords, British style crosswords, general knowledge crosswords and cryptic crossword puzzles Enter the answer length or the answer pattern to get better results Click the answer to find similar crossword clues The Arabian Nights, Burton, Full Leather Easton Full Leather Easton Press Fine shelf appearance Very Good overall Light wear to Gilt Edge Like new silk end pages, bright and clean internally.


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10 thoughts on “The Arabian Nights

  1. Jan-Maat Jan-Maat says:

    As a child I had a small selection of tales from the Arabian nights in a hardback volume with a few gorgeous full colour plates From this a couple of stories stayed with me, a Sultan travelling in disguise meets a man who having learnt of the Sultan s weakness for baby cucumbers was intent on trying to fool him out of a fortune in exchange for them, the man although greedy is also garrulous, tells the Sultan in disguise his wicked plans enabling the Sultan to turn the tables on him and trick hi As a child I had a small selection of tales from the Arabian nights in a hardback volume with a few gorgeous full colour plates From this a couple of stories stayed with me, a Sultan travelling in disguise meets a man who having learnt of the Sultan s weakness for baby cucumbers was intent on trying to fool him out of a fortune in exchange for them, the man although greedy is also garrulous, tells the Sultan in disguise his wicked plans enabling the Sultan to turn the tables on him and trick him and eat the cucumbers view spoiler from which we learn that if one becomes a Sultan or Sultana it is of prime importance to always wander one s Sultanate in disguise to avoid being tricked and fooled by the greedy hide spoiler , then a story about the keys of Destiny view spoiler basically if a mysterious Sheikh turns up claiming to be your uncle and asking you to come into the desert and that your archery skills may come in handy and even if he saves your life he probably doesn t have your best interests at heart, so don t be surprised that if he gives you a palace that it leaks and is damp and cold even in Egypt hide spoiler , and a story about a Sultan of Egypt who had a beautiful wife, excellent children, but none less had depression, then one day a mysterious old man who had spent so many years on mountain tops growing wise than he no longer needed to wear clothes ie his beard and hair had grown so long that it was wound about him to form a dense coat wandered in to his palace and forced the Sultan to have an extremely unpleasant visionary experience which cures him of his depression view spoiler although possibly in the process leaving the Sultan conditioned with anxiety about Bathhouses and donkeys hide spoiler.So anyhow spotting a new translation in the Everyman series I determined to buy it inevitably those stories were not in it Apparently in the dim and distant past there were two story collections the Arabian Nights and the 1000 and one nights which at one stage merged like a dream of Italo Calvino indeed very much so as the stories became very popular in Europe through French translations, the translator spotting this, commissioned additional stories, or maybe just made up new ones to best match the taste of eighteenth century French readers This collection purports to get round this by drawing on medieval manuscripts, the translation preserves the frequent divisions into nights some of which are less than a page long This breaks up the flow of the stories, but provides the reader with the sense of frustration which was meant to be experienced in the framing story.As this version is truer to the manuscript tradition, some of thefamiliar tales are missing however those given here have a certain power from their rhythm and the sense of the inevitable, that element and the attitude towards sexual adventure reminded me very strongly of Boccaccio s Decameron Another attraction is the sense of falling through from one story to next, as in the middle of one story a character will begin to tell a story to another character which the narrative then takes up It is rather like If on a Winter s Night a Traveller and the effect is both disconcerting and exciting A constant moving between narratives and framing stories all insanely nested within each other only missing an internal narrator to begin telling the story of Scheherazade to achieve a M bius strip narrative and for the reader to disappear without trace


  2. Destiny Dawn Long Destiny Dawn Long says:

    This edition is a translation of the first 271 nights from the 1001 Nights cycle One of my favorite aspects of this work is the role of Shahrazad While many people discuss that she is telling the stories to save her own life, what people fail to recognize many times is that, really, she volunteers to be placed in the position in order to save her kingdom She s a great literary heroine saving the world through storytelling It also provides a great lens into a world that today is depicted i This edition is a translation of the first 271 nights from the 1001 Nights cycle One of my favorite aspects of this work is the role of Shahrazad While many people discuss that she is telling the stories to save her own life, what people fail to recognize many times is that, really, she volunteers to be placed in the position in order to save her kingdom She s a great literary heroine saving the world through storytelling It also provides a great lens into a world that today is depicted in US media as a wartorn hotbed for terrorist activity For me it was a reminder that Bagdhad used to be a beautiful, opulent city and cultural center Anyone with an interest in storytelling, folklore, or the culture of Persia and the Arabian world should check out this work Although I have no other translations for comparison, I think that this one is excellent I found it readable, but with important words and names left untranslated Also, Haddawy isn t afraid to describe sexual situations plainly, without overly poetic euphamisms


  3. Alex Alex says:

    What you thought was the Arabian Nights waslikely Richard Burton s bastardized, inflated 19th century adaptation, which was as much about Richard Burton and his weird ideas about sex as it was about Arabia Which is sortof neither here nor there there is no canonical version of Arabian Nights anyway It s just an umbrella term for, basically, all of the Middle East s favorite stories And if the version that heavily influenced guys like


  4. Terry Terry says:

    Shahrazad turned to King Shahrayar and said, May I have your permission to tell a story He replied, Yes, and Shahrazad was very happy and said, Listen Of all of the world s story collections, surely The Arabian Nights has the best framing device the best fictional pretext by which to justify the telling of the other stories I mean the story of Shahrazad as this text transliterates her name , the daughter of the vizier to King Shahrayar Bitter over his first wife s betrayal, Shahrayar Shahrazad turned to King Shahrayar and said, May I have your permission to tell a story He replied, Yes, and Shahrazad was very happy and said, Listen Of all of the world s story collections, surely The Arabian Nights has the best framing device the best fictional pretext by which to justify the telling of the other stories I mean the story of Shahrazad as this text transliterates her name , the daughter of the vizier to King Shahrayar Bitter over his first wife s betrayal, Shahrayar decides that he will avenge himself on womankind by marrying a different woman every night and having her killed in the morning As the tally of victims rises, the vizier, who has been charged with procuring these wives from among the daughters of the kingdom s princes, becomesanddesperate until one day Shahrazad herself volunteers to marry the king and stubbornly refuses to be dissuaded by her father On the night of her nuptials, Shahrazad begins to tell Shahrayar a story to while away the hours until dawn when she will be killed When the sun rises before she can complete the tale, the king decides to spare her until the next night so that he can find out whether a demon kills the merchant against whom he has raised his sword And so begins the endless series of narrative delays and nesting of tales by which the storyteller manages to make herself indispensable to the tyrannical king and so too begins the tyrannical king s education in empathy as he listens to tales of justice and injustice, of fidelity and betrayal, of statecraft and misrule Some of the tales haveartistry than others Some are sentimental Some seem intended merely to titillate To my mind, no single tale lives up to the best of Chaucer, whose Canterbury Tales are roughly contemporary to these Still, the power of the Nights is cumulative in the way of good refrains Again and again, we are told, But morning overcame Shahrazad, and she lapsed into silence only to have the tale taken up again the next night These lapses and interruptions invest even the silliest tales with gravity, reminding us that all art is an appeal against our common death sentence, a plucky assertion of the meaningfulness of human experience against the overwhelming evidence that we are powerless and disposable What could possibly have motivated Shahrazad, the safest of all the kingdom s virgins, to put her body in the tyrant s bed One can only call it love, terrifying as it is to invoke that word love for the victims that led her to love their killer and to gamble her life on the humanity of his heart.Though a translator s note informs us that tradition has it Shahrazad bears Shahrayar three children and somewhere along the way earns enough trust to have her death sentence lifted, the tales where never finished by their original author whoever that may have been Later editors have felt free to add material, including many of the tales we most commonly associate with the Nights Sinbad the Sailor, Aladdin and the Magic Lamp, Ali Babba and the Forty Thieves Husain Haddawy leaves these out of his translation, following the editorial choices of Muhsin Mahdi, whose fourteenth century Syrian manuscript is the earliest one we have The fascinating history of the text and of its translation into Western languages is thoroughly documented in Haddawy s introduction convincingly enough to persuade me that I m in the hands of a good translator as I read


  5. Calzean Calzean says:

    There are stories within stories Wives who turn their husband lovers into animals who reap their revenge, remarry beautiful princesses who have fled a lecherous uncle who is really an evil spirit who is hiding from a witch who once was married to a Sultan who had many wives who all had affairs and many heads were cut off The one thing I found hard to understand was that some of the stories were often only a page or so SO how did this story telling last the whole night Methinks there wasThere are stories within stories Wives who turn their husband lovers into animals who reap their revenge, remarry beautiful princesses who have fled a lecherous uncle who is really an evil spirit who is hiding from a witch who once was married to a Sultan who had many wives who all had affairs and many heads were cut off The one thing I found hard to understand was that some of the stories were often only a page or so SO how did this story telling last the whole night Methinks there wasgoing on in this bed than was said


  6. Melanti Melanti says:

    These stories were so much funnier and bawdier than I was expecting I was expectingadventurous storiesakin to what I know of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves yet a large number of these stories featured rather licentious women It wasn t something I was expecting out of a set of stories being told by a woman to a man who was obsessed with the idea of unfaithful wives This particular edition is based off the core set of tales compiled by Muhsin Mahdi which reflect only the stori These stories were so much funnier and bawdier than I was expecting I was expectingadventurous storiesakin to what I know of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves yet a large number of these stories featured rather licentious women It wasn t something I was expecting out of a set of stories being told by a woman to a man who was obsessed with the idea of unfaithful wives This particular edition is based off the core set of tales compiled by Muhsin Mahdi which reflect only the stories that are contained in all known versions of the manuscript Incidentally, that means it does NOT contain some of thefamous stories that people think of when they think of 1,001 Arabian Nights. Haddawy has published a second volume of stories that contain these other tales that I do want to read someday I really enjoyed this particular translation and translation matters a great deal Burton the most common translation used seems to have elaborated a great deal Below I ve transcribed a couple of passages in several translations None of the passages are truly spoilers I just used the tags to make it a bit tidier.Passage 1 Haddawy view spoiler Well, my daughter Shahrazad, it happened that the farmer kept fifty hens and a rooster at home, and while he felt sad to depart his world and leave his children and relatives behind, pondering and about to reveal and utter his secret, he overheard a dog of his say something in the dog language to the rooster, who, beating and clapping his wings, had jumped on a hen and, finishing with her, jumped down and jumped on another The merchant heard and understood what the dog said in his own language to the rooster, Shameless, no good rooster Aren t you ashamed to do such a thing on a day like this The rooster asked, What is special about this day The dog replied, Don t you know that our master and friend is in mourning today His wife is demanding that he disclose his secret, and when he discloses it, he will surely die He is in this predicament, about to interpret to her the language of the animals, and all of us are mourning for him, while you clap your wings and get off one hen and jump on another Aren t you ashamed The merchant heard the rooster reply, You fool, you lunatic Our master and friend claims to be wise, but he is foolish for he has only one wife, yet he does not know how to manage her The dog asked, What should he do with her hide spoiler Burton view spoiler Now, Daughter Scheherazade, that merchant had in his outhouses some fifty hens under one cock, and whilst making ready to farewell his folk he heard one of his many farm dogs thus address in his own tongue the cock, who was flapping his wings and crowing lustily and jumping from one hen s back to another and treading all in turn, saying O Chanticleer How mean is thy wit and how shameless is thy conduct Be he disappointed who brought thee up Art thou not ashamed of thy doings on such a day as this And what, asked the rooster, hath occurred this day when the dog answered Dost thou not know that our master is this day making ready for his death His wife is resolved that he shall disclose the secret taught to him by Allah, and the moment he so doeth he shall surely die We dogs are all a mourning, but thou clappest thy wings and clarionest thy loudest and treadest hen after hen Is this an hour for pastime and pleasuring Art thou not ashamed of thyself Then by Allah, quoth the cock, is our master a lackwit and a man scanty of sense If he cannot manage matters with a single wife, his life is not worth prolonging Now I have some fifty dame partlets, and I please this and provoke that and starve one and stuff another, and through my good governance they are all well under my control This our master pretendeth to wit and wisdom, and she hath but one wife and yet knoweth not how to manage her Asked the dog, What then, O Cock, should the master do to will clear of his strait hide spoiler Lane view spoiler Now he had a cock, with fifty hens under him, and he had also a dog and he heard the dog call to the cock and reproach him, saying Art thou happy when our master is going to die The cock asked, How so and the dog related to him the story upon which the cock exclaimed By Allah our master has little sense I have fifty wives and I please this and provoke that while he has but one wife, and cannot manage this affair with her why does he not take some twigs of the mulberry tree, and enter her chamber, and beat her until she dies or repents hide spoiler Payne view spoiler Now he had a cock and fifty hens and a dog and he heard the latter say in his lingo to the cock, How mean is thy wit, O cock May he be disappointed who reared thee Our master is in extremity and thou clappest thy wings and crowest and fliest from one hen s back to another s God confound thee Is this a time for sport and diversion Art thou not ashamed of thyself And what ails our master, O dog asked the cock The dog told him what had happened and how the merchant s wife had importuned him, till he was about to tell her his secret and die, and the cock said, Then is our master little of wit and lacking in sense if he cannot manage his affairs with a single wife, his life is not worth prolonging See I have fifty wives I content this one and anger that, stint one and feed another, and through my good governance they are all under my control Now our master pretends to sense and accomplishments, and he has but one wife, and yet knows not how to manage her Quoth the dog, What, then, should our master do hide spoiler Lyons another recent translation view spoiler The merchant had a cock and fifty hens, together with a dog, and he heard the dog abusing the cock and saying You may be cheerful but here is our master about to die When the cock asked why this was, the dog told him the whole story By God, exclaimed the cock, he must be weak in the head I have fifty wives and I keep them contented and at peace while he has only one but still can t keep her in order Why doesn t he get some mulberry twigs, take her into a room and beat her until she either dies or repents and doesn t ask again hide spoiler And here s a second, bawdier passage I ve got to say in the Burton translation especially fifteen assaults or courses in one night What a stud All the poems were cut out from the passages just due to length.Haddawy view spoiler When Sit al Husn heard his words, she laughed and said, By God, my little lord, you have made me happy and put my heart at ease Take me and hold me in your lap She had no trousers on, so Badr al Din also took off his trousers and, taking from his belt the purse containing the thousand dinars he had received from the Jew, he wrapped it in his trousers and laid them under the mattress Then taking off his turban, which he laid over the wrapping cloth on the seat, he remained only in his shirt and skullcap and stood hesitating O my love, you are keeping me waiting Quench my desire with your love and let me enjoy your loveliness Then she recited these verses removed poem here break here for dawn Badr al Din Hasan and Sit al Husn embrace, and he took her virginity and consummated the marriage Then she placed one arm under his neck and the other under his shoulder, and with neck on neck and cheek on cheek they went to sleep, as if they seemed to say removed poem here hide spoiler Burton view spoiler When the Lady of Beauty heard these words she smiled and rejoiced and laughed a pleasant laugh Then she whispered him, By the Lord thou hast quenched a fire which tortured me and now, by Allah, O my little dark haired darling, take me to thee and press me to thy bosom Then she began singing poem removed Then she stripped off her outer gear and she threw open her chemise from the neck downwards and showed her parts genital and all the rondure of her hips When Badr al Din saw the glorious sight his desires were roused, and he arose and doffed her clothes, and wrapping up in his bag trousers the purse of gold which he had taken from the Jew and which contained the thousand dinars, he laid it under the edge of the bedding Then he took off his turban and set it upon the settle atop of his other clothes, remaining in his skull cap and fine shirt of blue silk laced with gold Whereupon the Lady of Beauty drew him to her and he did likewise Then he took her to his embrace and set her legs round his waist and point blanked that cannon placed where it battereth down the bulwark of maidenhead and layeth it waste And he found her a pearl unpierced and unthridden and a filly by all men save himself unridden and he abated her virginity and had joyance of her youth in his virility and presently he withdrew sword from sheath and then returned to the fray right eath and when the battle and the siege had finished, some fifteen assaults he had furnished and she conceived by him that very night Then he laid his hand under her head and she did the same and they embraced and fell asleep in each other s arms, as a certain poet said of such lovers in these couplets removed poem here hide spoiler Lane This particular set of stories seems to be missing.Payne view spoiler When the Lady of Beauty heard this, she smiled and rejoiced and laughed softly Then she said to him, Thou hast quenched the fire of my heart, so, by Allah, take me and press me to thy bosom Now she was without clothes so she threw open the veil in which she was wrapped and showed her hidden charms At this sight, desire stirred in Bedreddin, and he rose and put off his clothes The purse of a thousand dinars he had received of the Jew he wrapped in his trousers and laid them under the mattress then took off his turban and hung it on the settle, remaining in a skull cap and shirt of fine silk, laced with gold With this arose the Lady of Beauty and drew him to her, and he did the like with her Then he took her to his embrace and pointing the engine that batters down the fortress of virginity, stormed the citadel and found her an unpierced pearl and a filly that none but he had ridden So he took her maidenhead and enjoyed her dower of youth nor did he stint to return to the assault till he had furnished fifteen courses, and she conceived by him Then he laid his hand under her head and she did the like, and they embraced and fell asleep in each other s arms, whilst the tongue of the case spoke the words of the poet removed poem here hide spoiler Lyons Modern translation view spoiler When Sitt al Husn heard this from Hasan, she smiled with joy and laughed gently By God, she said, you have quenched my fire so I ask you to take me and crush me to your breast.She was without any outer clothing and when she now raised her shift up to her neck, her private parts and her buttocks were revealed At this sight, Hasan s passion was roused, and getting up, he stripped off his clothes He took the purse of gold with the thousand dinars that he had got from the Jew and wrapped it in his trousers, placing it under the end of the mattress, and he took off his turban and set it on a chair, leaving him only wearing a fine shirt embroidered with gold At that, Sitt al Husn went up to him and drew him to her as he drew her to him He embraced her and placed her legs around his waist He then set the charge, fired the cannon and demolished the fortress He found his bride an unbored pearl and a mare that no one else had ridden, so he took her maidenhead and enjoyed her youth Then he withdrew from her and after a restorative pause, he returned fifteen times, as a result of which she conceived When he had finished, he put his hand beneath her head and she did the same to him, after which they embraced and fell asleep in each others arms This was as the poet has described removed poem here hide spoiler


  7. Craig Craig says:

    Very entertaining and clever in the set up and framing of the stories Some very funny and others devilishly wry, with only a one that just did not pull me in I noticed two main themes among many others 1 Men are constructed as the focus for most of the stories yes, I know that Shahrazad is bold and takes a huge risk and a few female witches rear their crafty heads Their pride and arrogance in their positions of power pretty much are the set up for the stories and 2 The value of the stor Very entertaining and clever in the set up and framing of the stories Some very funny and others devilishly wry, with only a one that just did not pull me in I noticed two main themes among many others 1 Men are constructed as the focus for most of the stories yes, I know that Shahrazad is bold and takes a huge risk and a few female witches rear their crafty heads Their pride and arrogance in their positions of power pretty much are the set up for the stories and 2 The value of the story itself Throughout the matroyshka like path of stories, several characters are allowed to tell their tale often to save their skins as well Will probably come back to these for another fun adventure


  8. Shelly Leyden Shelly Leyden says:

    Clever girl Yep, Shahrazad is rightfully reclaimed as a feminist heroine But, arghhh The framing story here is just so hideous, I can hardly stand it OMG, insomnia much To save the local virgin grrrl population from a murderous misogynist gone mental, she must stay up with this bloodthirsty, tantrum y nightmare, wracking her brains to amuse him all night, every night for like 2.5 years and bearing him three kids in the process just cos he s outraged over getting cheated on a widdle Clever girl Yep, Shahrazad is rightfully reclaimed as a feminist heroine But, arghhh The framing story here is just so hideous, I can hardly stand it OMG, insomnia much To save the local virgin grrrl population from a murderous misogynist gone mental, she must stay up with this bloodthirsty, tantrum y nightmare, wracking her brains to amuse him all night, every night for like 2.5 years and bearing him three kids in the process just cos he s outraged over getting cheated on a widdle bit, big fat f cking crybaby I d ve given him something to cry about, let me tell you Gone insane in the membrane and slit his woman hating throat, homes For real, get between me and my sleep and you d best watch your back But this amazing woman s got the gift of gab, no doubt about it Her timing is impeccable, and her cliffhangers are on point She fascinates that bad boy like a boss, spinning crazy, interconnected tales filled with trix that are definitely not for kids You don t often expect to encounter sexy reward or punishment name that genitalia games in fairytales, do you Welp, these tales defy expectation, ok Because Shahrazad damn well knew her audience The tales are fascinated with physical beauty and bodily pleasures of all descriptions Tables filled with rich repasts Yards and yards of opulent fabrics Costume changes and negligees of every color, dripping with gems Sex and lust and infidelities galore Ditto swooning love at first sight, replete with poetry and song and of course, sneaking around Because naturally, such love is forbidden Sometimes by the all too familiar jealous man, but sometimes by a literal demon People are constantly taking forbidden actions, breaking harsh rules, missing truly deadly deadlines, and generally toying with fiery fate We get hidden doors to fantastical palace chambers underground, tantalizing secrets, and secret identities And once you know what you shouldn t, see what you oughtn t, or do what you mustn t Eye gouging, hand chopping, or various mortal slicing to follow Beatings and maimings and dismemberments abound there s even a bit of dead body humor a la Weekend at Bernie s Rags to riches to rags, again and again and again There ain t no party like an Arabian Nights part cuz an Arabian Nights party don t stop But somehow, at last it does Shahrazad s whip smart words tame her husband s sickening sword when that prick finally gets it that he freaking loves her And would be sad if she were dead Or at least bummed to be raising three kids alone Asshole I Just don t know how our girl stomachs him is all Anyway I read all the tales in translation at least I think I did TBH, they ran together after a time And yes, they are amazing, but also Repetitive and somehow flat Hanan al Shaykh feels the same, and this lady knows what she s talking about Now I need to read her One Thousand and One Nights A Retelling, where she curates and enhances just 19 tales plus the framing story and I ve little doubt she gets what I want out of the bargain Uh huh, I like to read the source, but now that I know what I didn t Wish I d begun my journey with this clever girl as my guide


  9. Edith Edith says:

    In the Arabian Nights, the portrayal of women appear to be either the faithless temptress wives with many wiles, or resourceful individuals who make their way such as in business investments or managing their inheritance households as well as sexual escapades without men controlling their affairs The two types are not necessarily exclusive.From a modern point of view, the stories are quite misogynist, many a times featuring men lamenting their women s perfidy while they themselves were picki In the Arabian Nights, the portrayal of women appear to be either the faithless temptress wives with many wiles, or resourceful individuals who make their way such as in business investments or managing their inheritance households as well as sexual escapades without men controlling their affairs The two types are not necessarily exclusive.From a modern point of view, the stories are quite misogynist, many a times featuring men lamenting their women s perfidy while they themselves were picking up the nth concubine , and some stories and verses appear to elevate honor killing The entire framework for the stories that of Sheherezade stopping the king s killing rampage of new brides begins on the premise that the previous queen and concubines had betrayed the king Interestingly, Sheherezade herself, a resourceful and courageous woman, would appear to belong to the latter category of women in the Nights, who tamed the king.Other times, the portrayal of the danger of feminine wiles is based on the notion that women are demanding and dangerously temperamental, which led men astray Several stories feature men who lost limbs because they resorted to petty crimes such as theft to buy gifts for the women A few stories even had the well born lady demanding the man s thumbs cut off for not washing his hands after eating ragout before he touched her, just like a commoner random The Arabian Nights seem to recognize that women are willful creatures, with needs, emotions, and appetites of their own and the resources to bypass patriarchal restrictions placed upon them It isn t surprising that there have been attempts in the region throughout history to control women, how they dress, and when could they leave the home so not to get into mischief In a sense, it s possible that it shows that men bear a grudging fear of women, of their minds and their charms.The Nights are full of cautionary tales of men driven to debt, and becoming maimed or killed, from stealing an illicit glance at an unveiled woman Kings, viziers, and merchants alike fall at the feet of strong willed, difficult women Perhaps that s why the region has historically been insecure and afraid of women, because they know women have the ability to run society without needing men if given the opportunity Misogynist as it may sound, this view may be higher than the casual disdain for women and mockery of their minds depicted in western thoughts of yore


  10. Sarah Sarah says:

    First and foremost, I think it s important for me to say that I read the Haddawy translation, which is vastly different from the Burton translation which has become the end all, be all version Basically, this means less padding, less historical inaccuracy and racism, and less of what everyone is used to As I am a sucker for reading a book as close to the original as humanly possible, the Haddawy translation was just the one for me The Arabian Nights has a very interesting set up, very much li First and foremost, I think it s important for me to say that I read the Haddawy translation, which is vastly different from the Burton translation which has become the end all, be all version Basically, this means less padding, less historical inaccuracy and racism, and less of what everyone is used to As I am a sucker for reading a book as close to the original as humanly possible, the Haddawy translation was just the one for me The Arabian Nights has a very interesting set up, very much like The Decameron There s the frame story explaining how Shahrazad even came to be in a situation where she needs to tell a story every night, then there are the stories themselves And to compare to The Decameron yet again, since there are so many stories, some of them are really cool and some of them are somewhat mediocre Since there are a large amount, it s just bound to happen, and it happened to this author exactly how it happened to Boccaccio Though this translation of the novel doesn t actually contain the most famous additions such as the tale of Aladdin or Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, there is still quite a bit of fun to be had in The Arabian Nights The majority of the stories are very bawdy in nature with plenty of sex and violence but mostly sex to go around sometimes I was shocked at how explicit it could be However, the style of writing is distinct enough that I was intrigued by just about anything I came across, even if it was a bit of a hard pill to swallow at some point I was a little disappointed to find that this translation did not contain as much content as I expected, but perhaps this is because my expectation that there would be 1001 stories comes from thefamous yetinaccurate translation Therefore, I think I did have a good time with The Arabian Nights, even if it was a little explicit for my tastes


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