The Political Philosophy of Hobbes: Its Basis and Its

The Political Philosophy of Hobbes: Its Basis and Its Genesis [KINDLE] ✿ The Political Philosophy of Hobbes: Its Basis and Its Genesis ❃ Leo Strauss – Thomashillier.co.uk In this classic analysis, Leo Strauss pinpoints what is original and innovative in the political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes He argues that Hobbes s ideas arose not from tradition or science but from In this classic analysis, Leo Strauss Philosophy of PDF ✓ pinpoints what is original and innovative in the political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes He argues that Hobbes s ideas arose not from tradition or science but from his own deep knowledge and experience of human nature Tracing the development of Hobbes s moral doctrine from his early writings to his major work The Leviathan, Strauss explains contradictions in the body of Hobbes s work and discovers startling connections between Hobbes and the thought of Plato, Thucydides, The Political ePUB ½ Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Hegel.


10 thoughts on “The Political Philosophy of Hobbes: Its Basis and Its Genesis

  1. Luke Echo Luke Echo says:

    I didn t really embrace this Perhaps its because Strauss inaugurated a reading of Hobbes that has now become mainstream, it was was hard to see what was at stake for Strauss.


  2. Lucas Johnston Lucas Johnston says:

    Strauss does a great job highlighting not only the basis of Hobbes political philosophy, but also the genesis, or the progression of his ideas along the way While I think the book leans slightly towardsgenesis than basis, it is still an excellent read.Up until reading this, I had a vague knowledge of Hobbes but definitely not a strong suit of mine This book has done a fantastic job in, I feel, bringing meup to speed with the place of Hobbes in the canon Hobbes is often said to ha Strauss does a great job highlighting not only the basis of Hobbes political philosophy, but also the genesis, or the progression of his ideas along the way While I think the book leans slightly towardsgenesis than basis, it is still an excellent read.Up until reading this, I had a vague knowledge of Hobbes but definitely not a strong suit of mine This book has done a fantastic job in, I feel, bringing meup to speed with the place of Hobbes in the canon Hobbes is often said to have been the individual who began modern political philosophy While Strauss, in the preface, has some reservations about this classification in hindsight he thinks Machiavelli s Discourses may actually have began modern political philosophy the influence of Hobbes is certainly undeniable.Up until Hobbes, political philosophy had existence in an awkward tension between ideal theory assuming that individuals will abide by the correct principles and reality, wherein often times individuals do not abide by the correct principles This has its roots in Plato when Plato sets out his political philosophy in Republic, he notes that such a society may never be possible, thus the disconnect between what Reason dictates and what seems possible Hobbes, in the course of his thinking, problematizes this distinction he seeks an answer to how to remedy this gap because theory and practice While first turning to history to see how one can be informed about how to bring about good results, Hobbes eventually rejects ideal theories like Plato s in the first place Hobbes main contribution is the collapse of the theory practice distinction by seeking to ground his political philosophy in something practical.Hobbes views human nature as having two tenets a desire for superiority over another, and a fear of violent death The former he calls vanity, which is the root of evil, and the latter he calls Reason, which is the root of good and justice Beginning from Reason, Hobbes seeks to ground all of his political philosophy in human nature, or rather, human experience He sees the fear of violent death as common to all, and by grounding his political philosophy in this, he creates a politics that is justifiable to anyone, anywhere, and any time In essence, Hobbes creates the first sort of social contract theory because of our fear of violent death in the state of nature, we will give up anything except our own lives in order to ensure our safety.The form of the politics grounded in our fear of violent death also falls back on the aforementioned grounds vanity and Reason Since vanity is public, while Reason is private we seek to appear strong around other but when alone, are given the space to truly contemplate and consider the preferable form of government is a Monarchy The nature of a public, deliberative politics is grounded in vanity Since vanity is the root of evil, it follows that any sort of democracy is necessarily flawed Instead, we ought to opt for a politics that allows decisions to be made free of vanity by having one individual who is afforded the ability to deliberate and govern in private, hence the monarch.As well, it can be said that Hobbes revolutionized political philosophy by turning from a state centric approach such as that of Plato and Aristotle, who began with the creation of a State and laws and then worried about individuals to an individual centric approach, as Hobbes grounds his political philosophy in a feature of the individual, their fear of violent death So, Hobbes main contributions are problematizing the ideal nature of political philosophy, turning his focus from the state to the individual and grounding his theory in a single principle.I now turn, to criticisms of both Hobbes, as explained by Strauss, and Strauss generally It seems to me that, despite Hobbes grounding his political philosophy in only the fear of violent death, that we may demandWhile it surely is a minimum, necessary requirement that a politics ensures us safe from violent death, it seems that we also want to have, such as Rawls claims, the social bases of self respect If we care about death insofar as we value life, it seems that we also require from our politics the ability to make our life and its projects worthwhile As well, since we need not only the social bases of self respect to make our projects worthwhile, but also the ability to pursue them, it seems we also may require some sufficient level of material well being that allows us to attend to our life s projects This all comes from a viewing of death as not bad in itself, but as contingently bad, depending on whether we view our lives as worth living.Turning now to Strauss himself, it is incredibly annoying that he quotes, at length, from many works without translation Since I myself and not fluent in French, Latin, German or Greek, his mass quotations from authors in their native tongue seems unnecessary While I understand a general aversion to translation, it seems to me to be evenfoolish to assume the readers familiarity with several different languages As well, one other problematic element is the disparity between usage of terms in Hobbes time, and contemporary usage In the later chapters, Strauss talks about how Hobbes morality is bourgeois This usage is entirely unclear bourgeois in Hobbes time may have simply referred to a morality of a community, rather than a morality restricted to aristocrats He seems to, at points, mean it thus However, given Strauss is writing in the early 20th century, it could also mean bourgeois in a Marxist sense he could be claiming that Hobbes morality is a capitalistic, consumption based ethic, which he also seems to mean in places.Lastly, at times, Strauss seems to move too fast and use words that carry an incredible amount of baggage without explanation This lead to me being a bit disoriented at times, however, I m unsure if this is a flaw of me, as a reader, or Strauss, as writer.In sum, though, this book is an excellent historical and philosophical exposition of Hobbes political thought, and I would have a hard time not recommending it to anyone who is curious about Hobbes place in the canon


  3. Ryan Ryan says:

    The book quotes from latin repeatedly and at length, and it never translated a word of it Would have been a four with translations


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *