The King's Gambit Epub ´ The King's Kindle -


The King's Gambit [PDF / Epub] ★ The King's Gambit Author John Maddox Roberts – Thomashillier.co.uk In this Edgar Award nominated mystery, John Maddox Roberts takes readers back to a Rome filled with violence and evil Vicious gangs ruled the streets of Crassus and Pompey, routinely preying on plebei In this Edgar Award nominated mystery, John Maddox Roberts takes readers back to a Rome filled with violence and evil Vicious gangs ruled the streets of Crassus and Pompey, routinely preying on plebeian and patrician The King's Kindle - alike So the garroting of a lowly ex slave and the disembowelment of a foreign merchant in the dangerous Subura district seemed of little consequence to the Roman hierarchy But Decius Caecilius Metellus the Younger, high born commander of the local vigiles, was determined to investigate Despite official apathy, brazen bribes and sinister threats, Decius uncovers a world of corruption at the highest levels of his government that threatens to destroy him and the government he serves Set inBC.

    Free Unlimited eBook merchant in the dangerous Subura district seemed of little consequence to the Roman hierarchy But Decius Caecilius Metellus the Younger, high born commander of the local vigiles, was determined to investigate Despite official apathy, brazen bribes and sinister threats, Decius uncovers a world of corruption at the highest levels of his government that threatens to destroy him and the government he serves Set inBC."/>
  • Paperback
  • 274 pages
  • The King's Gambit
  • John Maddox Roberts
  • English
  • 03 November 2017
  • 0312277059

About the Author: John Maddox Roberts

aka Mark RamsayJohn Maddox Roberts is the author of numerous works of science fiction and fantasy, in addition to his successful historical SPQR mystery series The first two books in the series have recently been The King's Kindle - re released in trade paperback He lives in New Mexico with his wife.



10 thoughts on “The King's Gambit

  1. Jim Fonseca Jim Fonseca says:

    A revision of an earlier review A great novel rich in historical detail about Rome, especially the complexities of politics and how people rose to power We also learn a lot about daily life in Rome meals, customs, slavery.We also learn a lot about crime and street thugs in ancient Rome Many people are murdered at this time in Rome, buy it only matters to the authorities if it is someone of social significance It wasn t always safe to go out in the streets at night despite the supposedly tig A revision of an earlier review A great novel rich in historical detail about Rome, especially the complexities of politics and how people rose to power We also learn a lot about daily life in Rome meals, customs, slavery.We also learn a lot about crime and street thugs in ancient Rome Many people are murdered at this time in Rome, buy it only matters to the authorities if it is someone of social significance It wasn t always safe to go out in the streets at night despite the supposedly tight control of the city by the Roman legions.And we have a murder mystery This is the first in a series of SPQR books by Roberts But a good companion book to this one by another author is Pompeii A Novel by Robert Harris which focuseson Roman architecture and hydraulic engineering aqueducts.top image by Amelie Veaux on redditmedia.comlower image from alamy.com ERGTNX

  2. Georgina Ortiz Georgina Ortiz says:

    I read this book while taking a break from Steven Saylor s Roma Sub Rosa series Because I only had two Roma Sub Rosa books left to read, I was scouting for another series set in Ancient Rome can t get enough of this genre I saw Roberts SPQR while surfing the Net, bought the first book in the series, and read it after finishing Saylor s A Mist of Prophecies.I wasn t disappointed.While the Roma Sub Rosa series can be described as fast paced I practically gobbled up every exhilarating book in I read this book while taking a break from Steven Saylor s Roma Sub Rosa series Because I only had two Roma Sub Rosa books left to read, I was scouting for another series set in Ancient Rome can t get enough of this genre I saw Roberts SPQR while surfing the Net, bought the first book in the series, and read it after finishing Saylor s A Mist of Prophecies.I wasn t disappointed.While the Roma Sub Rosa series can be described as fast paced I practically gobbled up every exhilarating book in the series , SPQR allowed you to savor every page morsel by interesting, well written morsel I want to compare Roma Sub Rosa s Gordianus with SPQR s Decius, but this is supposed to be a review of The King s Gambit Besides, that would be unfair because they are both wonderful protagonists I loved the book it painted Ancient Rome vividly and wonderfully Many of the characters that I encountered in Saylor s books, such as Caesar, Pompey, and the Clodians, I also encountered here Roma Sub Rosa and SPQR were both set in the late Roman Republic It was interesting to take a look at them from another author s perspective e.g Titus Annius Milo here was farlikable than in Roma Sub Rosa I kinda panicked while reading the last few pages of the book because I thought it was going to wrap up flatly, but there was a touching surprise at the end All I can say is, SPQR lessens the pain of having to end Roma Sub Rosa

  3. Natasa Natasa says:

    The story itself is simple and could be written in a few pages but it is the complexities of Roman society, the culture, language, social issues and politics that make these stories rich in detail with characters that are interesting, sympathetic, scandalous, and very human.

  4. Ozymandias Ozymandias says:

    I ve been disappointed with several of the Roman mysteries on offer and found myself looking back fondly on the old SPQR and Falcoseries I remembered these books as standouts and was curious how tainted my memory was by nostalgia I ve learned a lot about the ancient world since reading these books and I wondered whether my affection for these books would be reduced by the number of liberties taken.I m pleased to say that the books are as good as I remember, although this of course was never th I ve been disappointed with several of the Roman mysteries on offer and found myself looking back fondly on the old SPQR and Falcoseries I remembered these books as standouts and was curious how tainted my memory was by nostalgia I ve learned a lot about the ancient world since reading these books and I wondered whether my affection for these books would be reduced by the number of liberties taken.I m pleased to say that the books are as good as I remember, although this of course was never the best of them Decius is such a fun character to spend time with Principled but not pushy, clever but not a showoff, dilettantish but not excessively so Decius makes a great viewpoint character He s also a great narrator for his witty and cynical remarks I ve suspected him of many things, but never of innocence Moralists loved to rant about decadent Baiae It sent people flocking there Comments like this are what keep you reading when all else fails.The accuracy, as expected of historical murder mysteries, is spotty, although better than most The chief anachronisms come from the attitudes people have No Roman would have cared so much about the murder of people he didn t know, certainly not if they were only freedmen and foreigners And the idea of taking on the most powerful men in the state for the sake of duty is fairly unbelievable as well But the depiction of political activity and Roman governance is strong Roberts gets how thelimited Roman government worked and all the petty feuding and infighting There are plenty of interesting social tidbits here as well.I m pleased to say I still like this series Decius is just plain fun, the mystery is suitably complicated although immediately jumping to the top seems so typically rushed for a debut novel , and the world is well realized As I recall, the series gets even better in later books as some new characters are introduced and Decius climbs higher up the cursus honorem.Plot 5 Perhaps a bit rushed and lopsided Characters 8 Fun and engaging Accuracy 8 Attitudes wrong, facts mainly right

  5. Kathy Davie Kathy Davie says:

    First in the SPQR historical mystery series revolving around Decius Caecilius Metellus and his interest in snooping, LOL.My TakeRoberts is using a first person narration, and it s odd to hear him tell us what s happening now AND of various characters futures at the same time Useful, but odd It does, however, contribute to my feeling of being hit over the head As though I m not bright enough to pick up on the clues.That bit when Roberts introduces the forensics aspect of it with Asklepiodes a First in the SPQR historical mystery series revolving around Decius Caecilius Metellus and his interest in snooping, LOL.My TakeRoberts is using a first person narration, and it s odd to hear him tell us what s happening now AND of various characters futures at the same time Useful, but odd It does, however, contribute to my feeling of being hit over the head As though I m not bright enough to pick up on the clues.That bit when Roberts introduces the forensics aspect of it with Asklepiodes and his wounds study helped that feeling along Definitely an eye rolling moment The overt patriotism Decius proclaims is very admirable, but it has a juvenile feel to it It doesn t help that Decius stumbles over so many clues that should have had him questioning events and people much earlier in the story.Roberts does spend a lot of time informing us of the history of wars and Roman politics I m assuming it s to ensure we have a background against which we can follow along with the clues I just wish it didn t feel quite so much as if he were telling us Decius consultation with Cicero, however, was very well done in providing us with background information but disguised as advice.Like Steven Saylor in Roman Blood , Roberts also relays Roman customs of daily and religious life There sof an emphasis in this one on the military service required of Roman men, and a tremendous importance on putting on the toga when paying calls or anytime you want to impress people I m also grateful for our current religious practices I d hate to be so beholden to omens and portents There s a very useful explanation of the difference between plebeians and patricians Hmm, Roberts has made me curious about Spartacus All I know is about the movie and that he had been a slave Now I want to knowI m learning street level politics from Macro And you re learning Senate level politics from me, I said You re right And so far, it looks just like the street It s been an interesting blend of books I ve been reading lately, and it s set me to thinking about life before radio, television, and the Internet When people had to entertain themselves They learned to play instruments, memorize poems and plays, hold dances, perform in theatricals As much as I love my TV and Internet, I do wish we had a bitof the community involvement Yes, and then my second thought, but don t make me participate Oh, brother, I m such a hypocrite It s obvious from the start that Decius isn t expected to dothan sign off on the investigation It s also obvious that he s a conservative thinker.LOL, I did like how Sergius Paulus got around the matter of the disbursement of his estate and slaves I m having a hard time warming up to this I like the characters they re certainly colorful but there s a feeling of detachment, a coldness to this And I find I m getting confused between Saylor s Roma Sub Rosa and Roberts SPQR I like Saylor s taleit s warmer and pulls me in with the characters as opposed to viewing them and I ll likely read Saylor s series first.The StoryA fire at Paramedes warehouse and a series of murders creates a stir of interest around Metellus the Younger And it soon becomes obvious that he s expected to stamp this case closed The CharactersDecius Caecilius Metellus the Younger is serving as a commissioner for the Commission of Twenty six and has discovered he has a flair for snooping Burrus is an old soldier and part of Decius required entourage Cato is one of his slaves, the janitor or doorkeeper.Decius Caecilius Metellus the Elder, a.k.a., Cut Nose, served under General Marius and is now an Urban Praetor he ll stand for Consul in two years The Caecilii Metelli are a plebeian nobility with the only real negative that they are not qualified for certain priesthoods young Decius sees this as a plus Aunt Caecilia, the Vestal, was now the Virgo Maxima, the head of the college and of the Temple of the Vestals The Metellis patron is Quintus Hortensius Hortalus his character also appears in Steven Saylor s Roma Sub Rosa series.Publius Claudis Pulcher is a young hothead and planning to change his patrician status and become a Clodius instead Claudia is his much brighter sister with plans of her own Chrysis is her maid Prince Tigranes of Armenia is on the run from his father, King Tigranes the Elder Caius Julius Caesar seems to have shed his propensity for debauchery and debt to pursue a career in politics On the side of the Populares, no less He s currently married to Cornelia, a daughter of Cinna Decius says that he is the most brilliantly cold blooded schemer General Marcus Licinius Crassus is one of the richest and a Consul of Rome along with Pompey And Roberts repeats the rumors of Crassus habit of being the first at a fire Sergius Paulus is a freedman, but one of the richest men in Rome Pepi is the slave who sleeps across his bedroom door Marcus Ager was another freeman who used to fight under the name of Sinistrus Paramedes is an Asian Greek from Antioch, and the pirates representative in Rome Zabbai is a silk merchant Hasdrubal sells cloth in Ostia.Macro is a gang boss with political connections, including being a client of Hortensius Titus Annius Milo is a former rower who now works for Macro I suspect he ll be a regular in the cast A good thing, if so, as I do like him.General Lucius Licinius Lucullus is battling Mithridates, Rome s most current enemy, and is under fire in Rome Tribune Gnaeus Quintilius Carbo brings news of the war and Decius gives him warning.Lucius Satilius runs the gladiator school, Ludus Satilius Asklepiodes is the physician who has done a study of wounds.The cautious Rutilius is Commissioner for the Trans Tiber district Optimius is Commissioner in charge of the Aventine, Palatine, and Caelian districts Junius is the Senate freedman who acts as secretary Quintus Curius is an extraordinarily dissipated young Senator Cicero is here as is Tiro, his secretary slave Lucius Sergius Catilina.The Forum had been a mass of temples, market stalls, fortune teller s booths, speakers platforms, a place for men to idle, etc The CoverThe cover is gorgeous with a man s surprised face done in a Roman style mosaic, blood pooling along his jawline and banded top and bottom with marble The title is a chess move and I m not sure if it s Roberts play on King s Gambit being the first in a series or if it refers to Decius move within this story

  6. Dana Stabenow Dana Stabenow says:

    You must understand, whoever you are, that in those days Rome, mistress of half the world, was a place as savage as a village of Nile pygmies. Thus providing employment for our narrator, one Decius Caecilius Metellus, young commander of what passes for local law enforcement in his district of the city of the seven hills, circa 70BC As John Maddox Roberts The King s Gambit begins, someone is committing arson and garroting manumitted gladiators and rich freedmen in Rome In a plot that moves fro You must understand, whoever you are, that in those days Rome, mistress of half the world, was a place as savage as a village of Nile pygmies. Thus providing employment for our narrator, one Decius Caecilius Metellus, young commander of what passes for local law enforcement in his district of the city of the seven hills, circa 70BC As John Maddox Roberts The King s Gambit begins, someone is committing arson and garroting manumitted gladiators and rich freedmen in Rome In a plot that moves from simple murder to outright treason and threatens his own life, Decius investigation takes him into a Senator s sister s bed, to a brushing acquaintance with pirates those same pirates who betrayed Spartacus, and here we find out why all the way up to the Senate, including its two Consuls, Marcus Licinius Crassus and Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus Yes, that Crassus and that Pompey One of the most enjoyable things about this series which now numbers thirteen is the cameo appearances by characters right out of the history books, like Gaius Julius Caesar yes, that Caesar , as in The new calendar was one of Caesar s better ideas At least, he called it his calendar It was Cleopatra s court astronomer, Sosigenes, who actually created it, and in truth it was Caesar s own neglect of his duties when he was Pontifex Maximus that got the old calendar into such dreadful shape in the first place That s something you won t find in the histories written later by his lackeys Ouch But Decius gives the devil his due, too, as here Hortalus gave very florid speeches, in what was known as the Asiatic style He wrote the same waySuch writing reads very strangely now, since Caesar s bald and unornamented yet elegant style revolutionized Latin prose Between them, Caesar s books and Cicero s speeches utterly changed the language as it was taught in my youth.The period detail is great, too, as when Decius goes to Ostia to interview a witness From each shop front and storehouse came the fragrances of the whole Mediterranean world Incense and spices were stored here, and rare, fragrant woods The odors of fresh sawn cedar from the Levant and pulverized pepper from even farther east mingled with those of frankincense from Egypt and oranges from Spain It smelled like Empire.Decius is an engaging character, not the ambitious social climber you d expect from a young Roman on his way up, but a good man whose motivation to solve these crimes, as he confesses to his vestal virgin aunt, comes from not wanting to see innocent slaves crucified in lieu of the actual murderer Yet another true detail of soon to be imperial Rome that will make you glad you re enjoying this story in a comfortable chair in your living room two thousand years later, and not living through it yourself

  7. Estelle Estelle says:

    Maybe I wasn t in the right mood, or maybe it just wasn t very good I don t know I just didn t care much for it I ll stick to Marcus Didius Falco, he s a muchentertaining protagonist.

  8. Ken Ken says:

    The following is about the series as a whole, to most of which I give 5 stars I actually liked the later ones better than this one, the first, which was certainly good.I m an amateur Latinist with scholarly training, and have long had a particular interest in the late Roman Republic, the period of this series I m astonished at how well Roberts gets into the minds of the Romans, into the details of their lives, into events and the politics and other factors behind those events I find them much The following is about the series as a whole, to most of which I give 5 stars I actually liked the later ones better than this one, the first, which was certainly good.I m an amateur Latinist with scholarly training, and have long had a particular interest in the late Roman Republic, the period of this series I m astonished at how well Roberts gets into the minds of the Romans, into the details of their lives, into events and the politics and other factors behind those events I find them muchtrue to life than the other Roman series Saylor, Davis, which I nonetheless liked This is the real Rome, not Hollywood Rome, or the Rome of second rate teachers and innumerable hack historians As far as large scale events, their causes, and implications are concerned, you can just about read these books as history Where the history is subject to interpretation, Roberts is among the most perceptive interpreters In fact, never mind the just about Many historians have been less adequate and less and balanced.Even the historical characters seem astonishingly real, and true to history and to the personae they have left in literature Roberts makes even the shadowy Pompey into a lifelike character as has no other historian I ve read I haven t read Gelzer on P , a character who would have done exactly what the historical Pompey did One notable exception and virtually the only significant departure from known fact that I ve detected is the character of Milo Roberts Milo is plausible enough He s a bit larger than life, but this was a setting like Elizabethan England and the early American West that generated many people who actually were larger than life normally gets The real Milo did what Roberts Milo did in this series, as far as the historical record shows But I ve never seen any indication that Milo was ever a free rower, or that his origins were in the street The historical Milo was from the local nobility of a town outside of Rome, though he was certainly a gang leader and political agitator in Rome, and nothing much else If I recall correctly, in later books, Roberts reconciles Milo s background with the historical record as far as possible without deviating from the account given in the earlier books I would guess that Roberts Milo makes for much better fiction than the real one would have, and again, this is the only departure from history that I ve detected, and one which does not entail any other departures.The historical accuracy comes with no tradeoff in entertainment value, however Roberts is a fiction writer first and foremost Characterization, color, action, plot, and puzzle all make for a first rate read

  9. Jean Jean says:

    I have read a few books on ancient Rome recently and came across this Edgar nominated mysteries by John Maddox Roberts He is a new author to me but I understand he is a well known Sci Fi writer The book takes place in about 70 B.C.E and follows Decius Caecilius Metellus the younger, who is a patrician and former soldier how is now a low ranking official in the commission of Twenty Six sort of policeman The garroting of a manumitted gladiator, a foreign merchant and a wealthy freedman all i I have read a few books on ancient Rome recently and came across this Edgar nominated mysteries by John Maddox Roberts He is a new author to me but I understand he is a well known Sci Fi writer The book takes place in about 70 B.C.E and follows Decius Caecilius Metellus the younger, who is a patrician and former soldier how is now a low ranking official in the commission of Twenty Six sort of policeman The garroting of a manumitted gladiator, a foreign merchant and a wealthy freedman all in a short time in his district has Decius investigation the murders He uncovers a conspiracy by Publius Claudius Putcher Roberts is using a first person narration Robert does spend a lot of time in forming us of the history of wars and Roman politics of the time The author also relays Roman customs of daily life and religious life into the story Decius s consultation with Cicero was well done in providing background information but disguised as advice Lots of famous people in the book such as, Cicero, Pompey and Crassus as the dual consuls, Roman General Lucullus commander in Asia, and also Prince Tigranes of Armenia, brings history to life The story provides a murder mystery along with a bit of history of ancient Roman and information into the daily life of a Roman Makes for a fun read with a bit of education along the way I read this as an audio book Simon Vance did his usual excellent job narrating the book

  10. John John says:

    If you ve read the Falco series, this one ishard boiled, less snarky although, Decimus isn t bad with apt commentary Technology hadn t changed that much in the century between the series, so day to day life remained pretty similar Pirates feature in this story, which I don t recall much in Falco s travels, with one exception and that I recallas smuggling I m a fan of the sidekick Milo, as well as being drawn by John Lee s narration.

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