Stranger in a Strange Land PDF ✓ a Strange Epub


  • Kindle Edition
  • Stranger in a Strange Land
  • John Safran
  • English
  • 01 May 2019

10 thoughts on “Stranger in a Strange Land

  1. Petra-X Petra-X says:

    Safran is a sort of antipodean Louis Theroux and Jon Ronson rolled into one butupfront, that s the Australian in him He shares their ability to actually get on with extremists whilst at the same time not pandering to them unlike the majority white people and their media who now call a bloody shovel a nice spade for doing a little gardening with That is, we, our liberal minded modern selves mustn t call out any but our own brothers and sisters for racist, religious or sexist speech and at Safran is a sort of antipodean Louis Theroux and Jon Ronson rolled into one butupfront, that s the Australian in him He shares their ability to actually get on with extremists whilst at the same time not pandering to them unlike the majority white people and their media who now call a bloody shovel a nice spade for doing a little gardening with That is, we, our liberal minded modern selves mustn t call out any but our own brothers and sisters for racist, religious or sexist speech and attitudes as respect of another religious or racial group is the way we go now It s part of their religion, part of their tradition we say, and we can t interfere with that no matter evil we know it really is Intolerance is the greatest sin there is these days, and we can t be seen to be committing that That s where Safran scores, he ignores political correctness and tells it how it is Safran is very sarcastic, totally lacking in subtlety but making up for it by being very witty and able to lighten his writing with laugh out loud jokes and hilarious situations where he is undercover He rarely lies about being Jewish but sometimes he has to, and sometimes he takes on other persona in order to join groups and see how they operate and what they really think and are planning.He s not cruel and he tries to understand and be sympathetic at least at the time he is with them to each group of extremists But none of them think they are extremists, they all think they are rational people who know the truth, hence the title, Depends what you mean by extremist


  2. Greg Greg says:

    I actually listened to this as an audiobook, which was a classic with Safran narrating.Safran s time spent going into the depths of Australia s far left and far right seems full of contradictions and tangles What I particularly found interesting The far right are actually quiet multicultural One is a Hanson supporter, yet has a wife who came over as a refugeewe like refugees, but only if they are hot Eurasians This is the most multicultural anti multicultural rally I have ever been to I actually listened to this as an audiobook, which was a classic with Safran narrating.Safran s time spent going into the depths of Australia s far left and far right seems full of contradictions and tangles What I particularly found interesting The far right are actually quiet multicultural One is a Hanson supporter, yet has a wife who came over as a refugeewe like refugees, but only if they are hot Eurasians This is the most multicultural anti multicultural rally I have ever been to The far right have quiet a mixed crowd of race and culture, such as the leader of Rise up Australia Danny Nalliah being a Sri Lankan born Christian, or many Aboriginal protesters against Islam immigration Makes for awkward scenes at a protest when white skinned far left protesters start calling brown skin protesters racist bigots Much easier to stereotype them all as drunk white skinned bogans which however do make up the majority it seems, or violent bikie groups which don t help the family friendly image they want to promote As for Nalliah, it seems he comes from a part of Sri Lanka where there is infighting between Christians and Muslims, so as a extremist Christian he naturally hates them A part of assimilating is leaving behind ethic grievances Maybe Nalliah is the one who isn t assimilating hahaha On bath far right and left rallies, leaders of both sides seem to have agendas that go way beyond your typical cultural protectionism and fighting racism The far left seemed to want to make advances to turn Australia into a Socialist state, while the far right have these ultra racist actual racism, not just culturism about white supremacy not breeding with inferior races etc A lot of people turn up to rallies because they like arguing their values on Facebook, however usually aren t that invested in any deeper ideological sense and clear out when people start physically fighting in the street Or, they are just there for a piss up and to cause trouble both sides Extremists Muslims told Safran they get told If you don t like it here, leave We would they reply, but we are on a bloody no fly list The left seem to be so committed to anti racist, anti oppressive agendas, that they conveniently turn a blind eye when a Muslim then makes a racist, homophobic or sexist statement Safran liked to call these things Tangles No one wanted to jump on this, as you know.we don t want to look anti Islam like those guys I remember this was a real tangle for a lecturer of mine, who identified as a feminist, and also believed in respecting culture and allowing them to practice that here When someones culture involved practices that were oppressing womenthat created a real tangle for her Overall it was a pretty fun read and insight into some of the extreme factions that are operating within communities Well, not sure how much they are actually operating as such Myself, like Safran I really like the tangles Left Right pigeon holing is for secondary school.Look forward to reading Murder is Mississippi


  3. Alec Ritchie Alec Ritchie says:

    Safran is a sarcasm dripping voice of reason in the convoluted world of Australian extremism, where someone like Pauline Hanson can swear with a straight face that she was never against asian immigration, and where Islamic caucasians read the Quran between bouts of World of Warcraft Many moments in this book had me actually laughing out loud, and my partner had to suffer so many of Safran s most clever jokes in bed late at night that she had to remind me that reading was an individual activ Safran is a sarcasm dripping voice of reason in the convoluted world of Australian extremism, where someone like Pauline Hanson can swear with a straight face that she was never against asian immigration, and where Islamic caucasians read the Quran between bouts of World of Warcraft Many moments in this book had me actually laughing out loud, and my partner had to suffer so many of Safran s most clever jokes in bed late at night that she had to remind me that reading was an individual activity Safran himself is a bit of a fringe character A modern liberal journalist who is not an atheist, and who appears to have a deep empathy for even the most deplorable of Australians One thing is for sure, whenever he releases a book, I ll be buying it


  4. Ellen Ellen says:

    Immensely quotable and utterly likeable, Safran is a joy to read This book balances contradiction with whimsy and paints a puzzling picture of extremism in Australia It s not what you ve been lead to believe


  5. Bec Bec says:

    I very much liked this actually laughed aloudthan twice 3 times in fact I thought it was going to go chapter 1 John meets the nazis, chapter 2 John meets the terrorists, but it s not like that, it s one hectic journey where he meets as many people as he can writes about it as it happened.He meets Blair from the UPF the united patriot front , who may or may not be a Jew hater He meets a half Jewess whose so sure he isn t she s joined the movement, that includes marching under the I very much liked this actually laughed aloudthan twice 3 times in fact I thought it was going to go chapter 1 John meets the nazis, chapter 2 John meets the terrorists, but it s not like that, it s one hectic journey where he meets as many people as he can writes about it as it happened.He meets Blair from the UPF the united patriot front , who may or may not be a Jew hater He meets a half Jewess whose so sure he isn t she s joined the movement, that includes marching under the Reclaim Australia, which is actually a coalition of racist groups Or nationalist groups, however you want to spin it He also meets Avi, a Jew who runs a gym and wants to teach Jews self defense Hamza, a Muslim who confesses to supporting ISIS is actually on a no fly list so he can t go join them Which is actually pretty scary, but John makes him out to be a buffoon That s how they all come across really, as lovable buffoons who don t really know what they are on about.For example, the organiser of the Cronulla riots with an Asian wife, the UPF supporters going back to a Muslim s house after a protest for the after party, a rabid white racist being from Lebanese descent There is a sense that they are all playing, it doesn t really harm anyone.The anarchists are really pissed off by John, that s funny John gets pissed off cause they try to explain there are 2 types of violence, structural non structural that s why it s ok to be racist toward a white person possibly bash one That s my take anyhow.Trump Pauline both got elected while John was writing this book, possibly the most worrying group is the Q society, another group John tries to infiltrate to find out the truth, are they in fact Jews You ll have to read the book to find that out, I have given far too much away, but it may in fact be Ralph who is on the no fly list.I will tell you the funniest part is when John realises he is in fact the sneaky Jew, playing off both sides In a world gone mad, John takes the piss while telling it how it is Laugh, then think Islamophobia white pride is gaining ground in this country the people pushing the message are normalising it while seeming like everyday blokes I wonder if John will keep in touch with any of his new mates


  6. Timothy Dymond Timothy Dymond says:

    You really can reverse park anything into your belief system is John Safran s early reaction to the ideological mixes and contortions he discovers in the Australian far right E.g Pastor Daniel Nalliah of the fundamentalist Christian Catch the Fire Ministry can devote entire sermons to praising Israel and Judaism, and denouncing anti semitism, and invite along Blair Cottrell of the United Patriots Front UPF a man who wants a picture of Hitler is every school classroom Not only are Pa You really can reverse park anything into your belief system is John Safran s early reaction to the ideological mixes and contortions he discovers in the Australian far right E.g Pastor Daniel Nalliah of the fundamentalist Christian Catch the Fire Ministry can devote entire sermons to praising Israel and Judaism, and denouncing anti semitism, and invite along Blair Cottrell of the United Patriots Front UPF a man who wants a picture of Hitler is every school classroom Not only are Pastor Daniel and Blair relaxed with other in church, they also share public platforms at Reclaim Australia rallies These rallies Safran observes attract diverse looking crowds with people of Asian and Indian migrant backgrounds Pastor Daniel is Sri Lankan Safran recalls from his days as a DJ for Triple J s Hottest 100 events that they would kill for Pastor Daniel s ethnically diverse crowd rather than the sea of white faces that would invariably turn up Safran s book is a discussion of the basic unreality of the No Room for Racism poster that was circulated as an early response to Reclaim Australia rallies A skinhead with a swastika inked on his noggin and a cool as fuck black dude are starring each other down Safran shows up to a Reclaim event and finds that first speaker on the back of the ute is a woman paying respect to the Wurundjeri people as the traditional owners of the land.The common thread running through the present far right politics is fear and hatred of Islam This unites the Pastor Daniels, the Cottrells and Safran discovers the Jewish members of the Q Society They all believe Western sometimes Judeo Christian Civilisation is being undermined by liberal multiculturalism opening the door to Islam although they have a dim view of actual existing Western Civilisation which is apparently so weak it can be threatened by Mosques being built in country towns and Halal food being sold in supermarkets Throughout the book Safran makes the case that the role of religion in shaping people s world views is not taken seriously enough in Australia particularly when dealing with the fluid and opportunistic nature of far right politics This is particularly a problem for organised anti racist politics such as the No Room for Racism groups Their insistence in framing the confrontation with Reclaim in the manner of their poster leaves them ideologically unprepared for the diverse reality of the far right Safran also criticises No Room for Racism s reluctance to acknowledge anti semitism as an issue in Australia, particularly if it comes from Muslims When he points out that No Room has ignored an incident in which a Muslim radical has assaulted a Rabbi he is told that, since it is interpersonal rather than structural violence, it is of no concern for the anti racism campaign Safran also talks to Hamza , a ISIS supporter who scorns the idea that Australian Muslims travel to the Middle East to fight for the group because they feel oppressed Let me count every single person I know who has left , he says None of them are unemployed None Not a single one Some of them were the most wealthiest of all This is a purely religious thing Safran s book is framed as a journey that takes him to meet various characters on the far right, and in that sense it is reportage with jokes rather than detailed analysis His personality is a major character as well so how much you like the book may come down to how much you take to the Safran style His take home message is that mainstream Australian culture, with its relatively secular outlook in which religion is confined to occasional observances, is unprepared to handle the devoutly religious mindset, which Safran describes as magical thinking, seeing patterns in the world, a sense that there are no coincidences, a determination that friends and strangers must be saved, karma and providence Safran proposes that it is magical thinkers rather than terrorists who cross borders and this is why Australian culture will change And bizarrely it is people who are claiming to defend Australian culture such as Pastor Daniel and Cottrell who are really un Australian in the religiosity and strange obsessions of their world views Two criticisms of Safran s book might be that he underplays the role of outright racism, and that he under appreciates the role religion has already played in Australian history and culture Blair Cottrell may be enough of a pragmatist to play nice with Pastor Daniel s multiethnic flock, but he clearly comes from the longstanding racist far right, as Safran himself discovers when he delves deeper into Cottrell s world view Religion also has a notable track record of intervening in Australian culture and life e.g the involvement of the Catholic Church in the split of Labor Party which had far reaching consequences for political history However Safran s overall point that the role of religion in far right movements is under appreciated is well made Anti racist responses that follow a cartoonish view of the world skin heads versus cool kids simply can t comprehend the appeal of these groups A materialist analysis of the far right, and of religious fundamentalism generally, misses the point that many people genuinely believe in their religious world views, and are prepared to act on them


  7. Declan Melia Declan Melia says:

    I remember reading some thinker define art as being the sole medium that amplifies life s complexities, whereas everything else is in a rush to oversimplify everything If that s the case, Safran is an artist I ve always considered him an underrated thinker, in all things he delights in the complexities What he likes to call tangles In this case it s race politics, which, to the chagrin of both sides are constantly being misrepresented as far simpler than they actually are Safran is a curi I remember reading some thinker define art as being the sole medium that amplifies life s complexities, whereas everything else is in a rush to oversimplify everything If that s the case, Safran is an artist I ve always considered him an underrated thinker, in all things he delights in the complexities What he likes to call tangles In this case it s race politics, which, to the chagrin of both sides are constantly being misrepresented as far simpler than they actually are Safran is a curious sort of writer I remember him saying on his radio show that when he began writing that he was unable or unwilling to find a unique authorial voice and so very directly lifted his voice from an American pulp novelist he admired at the time It kind of shows, He uses the blunt, direct phrasing of crime writing but uses his own distinct vocabulary and sarcasm, what I m sure he wouldn t mind me calling his schtick.To be a little critical The nature of Safran s contention means that this became repetitive towards the second half Safran explores divergent concepts and situations but reaches the same conclusions This doesn t mean the conclusions are wrong, it just means there might not be muchinsight to gleam from the last hundred pages that we didn t gleam in the first There is something of a storyline, Safran starts to see disconcerting transformations in himself while exploring his subject, but this aspect of the book just felt a little rushed, as if it was coupled on at the last moment This was entertaining and informative The aggregate of the subject matter and the author also made it completely original No other author would have explored this subject in such a way Some of the reportage dismayed me and some of it I found hopeful Safran proves the poverty of partisanship The world is simply so complicated that by subscribing too rigidly to political ideologies any side will eventually run into contradictions, false logic or be forced to augment the truth He also exposes Australia for what we are, an inconsistent, confused nation hellbent on defining ourselves by what we are not, since we sure as hell don t understand what we are


  8. John John says:

    Laugh out loud funny if bleak irony and sass is your cup of tea A very different picture of the hard left and right than I expected Well worth a read.


  9. Keen Keen says:

    This is an interesting book, by a guy who has done a lot of interesting work He returns to many of the themes that he has previously explored, in some of his TV shows in his native Australia, such as Race Relations and John Safran Vs God Set primarily in and around Melbourne, Safran also ventures out to sleepy Mildura and Bendigo in country Victoria, in pursuit of his quarry He also ends up as far afield as Sydney and Perth trying to make sense of philosophies, agendas and political belie This is an interesting book, by a guy who has done a lot of interesting work He returns to many of the themes that he has previously explored, in some of his TV shows in his native Australia, such as Race Relations and John Safran Vs God Set primarily in and around Melbourne, Safran also ventures out to sleepy Mildura and Bendigo in country Victoria, in pursuit of his quarry He also ends up as far afield as Sydney and Perth trying to make sense of philosophies, agendas and political beliefs of various extreme groups within Australia.He is good at highlighting the many contradictions of the Abrahamic faiths, including his own, showing the deep intolerance and accepted cruelty that lies in their texts He talks to many leaders from a number of so called extreme right groups and finds that many have Asian partners and even children with them, which raises many provocative questions.Although Safran limits his book to the relatively parochial realms of Australia, he does suggest at the possible global implications and repercussions, and at the end he tags on Trump coming into power and clumsily tries to connect this to his book, as if this was somehow directly a result of his findings It doesn t really work at all Also, the structure is sometimes loose to the point of occasionally losing its way, as you wonder where he is going next I found the ending pretty poor as it had no real summary, reflection or conclusions of what he found I was left confused and frustrated I felt he could have dug deeper and he really should have produced a proper ending.Overall this is an enjoyable though flawed read, some knowledge of Australian culture and politics certainly helps, but it s no barrier to enjoying it Safran shows that rarely are concepts of race and religion as simple as black and white or right and wrong Instead he reveals the many complex contradictions and back stories that make up these identities and that rarely if ever should any of these people, concepts and faiths be dismissed at first sight


  10. Leticia Supple Leticia Supple says:

    Like many people in my generation, I became a fan of Safran when he was in Race Around the World on ABC TV here in Australia, back in the 1990s It was his first TV appearance, and no doubt as a result of his sometimes extreme stunts staying illegally overnight in a Japanese subway train station, breaking into Disneyland, taking peyote on camera, etc etc , he cemented himself in Aussie culture He s been somewhere in the media ever since.It s perhaps surprising, then, that this is the first boo Like many people in my generation, I became a fan of Safran when he was in Race Around the World on ABC TV here in Australia, back in the 1990s It was his first TV appearance, and no doubt as a result of his sometimes extreme stunts staying illegally overnight in a Japanese subway train station, breaking into Disneyland, taking peyote on camera, etc etc , he cemented himself in Aussie culture He s been somewhere in the media ever since.It s perhaps surprising, then, that this is the first book of his that I ve read That s not because of a diminished fandom Rather, it s because after he started exploring questions about the nature of God, My interest in his output diminished That and the fact that I got rid of my TV in my early 20s and haven t looked back except when I realise how much of today s culture is baked in the telly s glow But this this caught my eye.As an extremist himself, and as someone who feels the fear and does things anyway, I was curious to see what kind of snapshot Safran captured with his work.A snapshot is truly what it is It s an interesting exploration of how Australia s extremism became so confusing About how we have minorities discriminating against other minorities, and that they don t see it About how ethnicity and culture are not the same thing About how religion creates some really fucked up perspectives the world About how Safran s quirky little interests in the entanglement of ideas in society became mainstream Fast.Interestingly, the curious, exploratory John in the beginning of the narrative faded away, and disappeared in much the same way as the subject became harder to pin down The closer he got to the subject, thediffuse it became, and thedifficult it was to discern which extreme view was which Those who were initially so vehement seemed to lose interest even in their own causes people stopped paying attention once it became actually political.The book itself seemed to peter out towards the end, and if I were less interested in cogitating, it would be a deflating read.The work leaves us withquestions than it answers It leaves us wondering, what are the limits of extremity, in a political sense What happens if we are merely curious, but in our curiosity accumulate artefacts that make us look like extremists What is the Australian way, really How should we react to events in the world, when we are such a long way away, so isolated, and getting everything through the filters of the Internet, our biases, and the media How rogue can you really go in Australia, when as soon as political parties form and people can vote for the extreme views, the edges fray and disappear It s an amusing read in parts, yet only because Safran is so self deprecating I rather formed the view that this came from a discomfort about the topic itself, in the end as though a concern about the validity of his work and perhaps even his own independence as a journalist potentially at risk when exploring these kinds of things dampened how much piss you can really take.Eventually, extremity becomes the common view.It was a good read, and I recommend it If you re an essayist or a writer yourself, you ll also get a whole lot of insight into how the work was crafted, too Perhaps an unintentional side view for those who can see it, but it is one that I really appreciated


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Stranger in a Strange Land[Read] ➫ Stranger in a Strange Land By John Safran – Thomashillier.co.uk John Safran takes on the hottest topics in contemporary Australia his home turf in ways than one race, Islam and extremism In classic Safran style, he s diving headfirst into the world of Australian e John Safran takes on the hottest a Strange Epub Û topics in contemporary Australia his home turf in ways than one race, Islam and extremism In classic Safran style, he s diving headfirst into the world of Australian extremism, from local ISIS supporters to Reclaim Australia to the tinnie terrorists The stories here are extraordinary larger than life, and alarmingly insightful And of course there ll be Safran s presence to make everything even exciting In the tradition of Jon Ronson and Louis Theroux, Stranger in Stranger in ePUB ½ a Strange Land is an innovative, compelling and unique look at Australia today.


About the Author: John Safran

Is a well known author, some a Strange Epub Û of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Stranger in a Strange Land book, this is one of the most wanted John Safran author readers around the world.