[Ebook] Henry IV, Part 1 By William Shakespeare – Thomashillier.co.uk

Henry IV, Part 1 This Play Introduces Shakespeare S Greatest Comedic Character, The Dissolute Knight Sir John Falstaff While King Henry S England Is Threatened By Rebellion, The King S Scapegrace Son Hal Haunts The Taverns Of London, His Companions A Crew Of Rogues And Thieves Let By Falstaff The Earl Of Northumberland And His Fiery Son Hotspur Scheme To Overthrow The Crown Can Hal Be Brought To A Sense Of Duty As Prince Of Wales Or Will The Influence Of Falstaff Prove Too Strong The Issue Is Decided When Hal, Hotspur, And Falstaff Come Together At The Climactic Battle Of Shrewsbury Hal Is Played By Jamie Glover And King Henry By Julian Glover Richard Griffiths Is Falstaff.


10 thoughts on “Henry IV, Part 1

  1. says:

    I have read this play many times, and although Shakespeare always shows me something new this reading gave me little insight and few surprises I was struck with two parallels, however one within the play itself, and one within Shakespeare s body of work First of all, I appreciated the subtle parallels between the Hotspur Glendower and the Hal Falstaff scenes Each young man spends much of his time needling a self important, older man who is such a windbag that the audience is almost automat I have read this play many times, and although Shakespeare always shows me something new this reading gave me little insight and few surprises I was struck with two parallels, however one within the play itself, and one within Shakespeare s body of work First of all, I appreciated the subtle parallels between the Hotspur Glendower and the Hal Falstaff scenes Each young man spends much of his time needling a self important, older man who is such a windbag that the audience is almost automatically on the young man s side Hotspur, whom we are inclined to respect because of his high spirits and his achievements as a warrior, is so easily irritated, and carries his own self regard so close to the surface, that his needling of Glendower although deserved seem pointless, rash and injudicious It may, in fact, prove fatal, since Glendower fails to come to Hotspur s aid when most needed a dereliction perhaps precipitated by the y...


  2. says:

    I really do not like Shakespeare I find him rather vulgar and his humor is not the kind that good jokes should be made of John Falstaff, in this play, was a fun and ridiculous character He was, perhaps, mean...


  3. says:

    King Henry IV, Part 1 Wars of the Roses, 2 , William ShakespeareHenry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written no later than 1597 It is the second play in Shakespeare s tetralogy dealing with the successive reigns of Richard II, Henry IV two plays, including Henry IV, Part 2 , and Henry V Henry ...


  4. says:

    How hard it must be to fight an enemy you admire how hard it must be to realise your enemy is a stronger, and perhapsworthy, man than your son, and how great it must be to realise that you are such a hypocritical fool, and that your son isthan you ever dreamed But first, you must lament your heir to your advisors, clearly a great move Yea, there thou mak st me sad and mak st me sin In envy that my Lord Northumberland Should be the father to so blest a son A son who is the theme of How hard it must be to fight an enemy you admire how hard it must be to realise your enemy is a stronger, and perhapsworthy, man than your son, and how great it must be to realise that you are such a hypocritical fool, and that your son isthan you ever dreamed But first, you must lament your heir to your advisors, clearly a great move Yea, there thou mak st me sad and mak st me sin In envy that my Lord Northumberland Should be the father to so blest a son A son who is the theme of honour s tongue, Amongst a grove the very straightest plant, Who is sweet Fortune s minion and her pride Whilst I, by looking on the praise of him See ...


  5. says:

    While William Shakespeare s Henry IV, Part 1 is a different experience than Richard II, it is a fantastic play The action picks up shortly after the conclusion of Richard II after Bolingbroke has deposed the now dead Richard and become King Henry It still has a serious side, but this play subverts the legitimacy of the monarchy by the ways it uses language It does this most effectively by its depiction of the heir to the throne, Prince Henry known as Hal and his debased and disgraced comp While William Shakespeare s Henry IV, Part 1 is a different experience than Richard II, it is a fantastic play The action picks up shortly after the conclusion of Richard II after Bolingbroke has deposed the now dead Richard and become King Henry It still has a serious side, but this play subverts the legitimacy of the monarchy by the ways it uses language It does this most effectively by its depiction of the heir to the throne, Prince Henry known as Hal and his debased and disgraced compatriot, Sir John Falstaff and the juxtaposition of their comic mocking with the se...


  6. says:

    O, while you live, tell truth, and shame the DevilWilliam Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1Falstaff Yes, I knew who he was But until this year my exposure to Falstaff was mainly second hand, through books that spoke of him I hadn t touched any of Shakespeare s histories I m not counting Julius Caesar, etc., as a history and so was surprised at just how much I liked this character There are plays where the character and the play are equally matched Othello, Hamlet, etc , but there arO, while you live, tell truth, and shame the DevilWilliam Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1Falstaff Yes, I knew who he was But until this year my exposure to Falstaff was mainly second hand, through books that spoke of him I hadn t touched any of Shakespeare s histories I m not counting Julius Caesar, etc., as a history and so was surprised at just how much I liked this character There are plays where the character and the play are equally matched Othello, Hamlet, etc , but there are those plays where the character seems to float beyond the play Henry IV, Part I seems like one of those The play was great I enjoyed it But every time Falstaff arrived it seemed to jump up a level It was certainly not a play where Falstaff played a central role Obviously, Henry, Prince of Wales plays that part and he is fascinating himself but Falstaff just dervishes around the play making everything better B...


  7. says:

    After Richard II, this is the second episode of Shakespeare s major Histories the events that will lead up to the Wars of the Roses This play is not so much about Bolingbroke Henry IV, as it is the first of a vast trilogy on Prince Hal Henry V from Eastcheap to Azincourt The first part of Henry IV tells the events of the rebellion of the barons, following the lead of young Harry Percy, against the king they initially placed on the throne of England Simultaneously, it is also a captivating After Richard II, this is the second episode of Shakespeare s major Histories the events that will lead up to the Wars of the Roses This play is not so much about Bolingbroke Henry IV, as it is the first of a vast trilogy on Prince Hal Henry V from Eastcheap to Azincourt The first part of Henry IV tells the events of the rebellion of the barons, following the lead of young Harry Percy, against the king they initially placed on the throne of England Simultaneously, it is also a captivating and cheeky chiaroscuro on the low ranking people, the nobodies, living in a dodgy tavern, at the same time as the king and nobility It is, to my knowledge, the first time Shakespeare includes the commone...


  8. says:

    Still one of my most favorite histories, or at least part one of perhaps three Our favorite wastrel, Prince Henry, Hal to his friends, a drunkard, a thief, the bosom buddy of dear fat old Falstaff, hides his bright sun behind vile clouds so as to shine all the brighter when his day finally arrives.In here, of course, we establish the lout with a sharp mind and careful cunning, dissembling for all to see but careful of the long game When his his father sore needs his son s aid, Hal comes to Still one of my most favorite histories, or at least part one of perhaps three Our favorite wastrel, Prince Henry, Hal to his friends, a drunkard, a thief, the bosom buddy of dear fat old Falstaff, hides his bright sun behind vile clouds so as to shine all the brighter when his day finally arrives.In here, of course, we establish the lout with a sharp mind and careful cunning, dissembling for all to see but careful of the long game When his his father sore needs his son s aid, Hal comes to the rescue, throwing off all such base clouds, or as little as need be, to ensure both his father and the close court of his worthiness, and he does so with flying colors, killing the most worthy night in England, the poor Percy of the Hot Blood, and so restoring both his honor and his valor in both word and deed.This, of course, is just the prelude The foreshadowing The stage upon such things as t...


  9. says:

    Food for powder, food for powder They ll fill a pit as well as better. This is undoubtedly one of Shakespeare s strongest plays In tone and atmosphere it is farvaried and naturalistic than its predecessor, Richard II The scenes with Hal amid the low life of London are fetching, and do much to alleviate the stiff and stuffy courtly atmosphere of some of Shakespeare s histories The comedy also helps and this play contains some of Shakespeare s highest and lowest comedy, both of which a Food for powder, food for powder They ll fill a pit as well as better. This is undoubtedly one of Shakespeare s strongest plays In tone and atmosphere it is farvaried and naturalistic than its predecessor, Richard II The scenes with Hal amid the low life of London are fetchi...


  10. says:

    The second play about The Wars of the Roses and so massive in history, good ol Will had to make two parts about this particular king Henry IV was Henry Bolingbroke, the one who deposed the old king, Richard II Since then, he has not had a quiet reign There are still those who want Richard back funny, considering how many supported Henry because they were unsatisfied with Richard s way of doing things How did kings usually solve such a problem Right, with a crusade, what else But he face The second play about The Wars of the Roses and so massive in history, good ol Will had to make two parts about this particular king Henry IV was Henry Bolingbroke, the one who deposed the old king, Richard II Since then, he has not had a quiet reign There are still those who want Richard back funny, considering how many supported Henry because they were unsatisfied with Richard s way of doing things How did kings usually solve such a problem Right, with a crusade, what else But he faces such problems with Wales and Scotland that he can t go on the merry road and killing trip There is lots of intrigue from influential families such as the Percys and Henry s own so...


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