Paperback ☆ Afrikalı Leo PDF ↠


Afrikalı Leo ❮KINDLE❯ ❆ Afrikalı Leo Author Amin Maalouf – Thomashillier.co.uk Afrikal Leo, ger ek bir ya am yk s nden kar lm d sel bir ya am yk s Bir berberin s nnet etti i, bir Papa n n vaftiz etti i Hasan ibn Muhammed el Vezzan ez Zeyyati, nam di er Giovanni Leone de Medici n Afrikal Leo, ger ek bir ya am yk s nden kar lm d sel bir ya am yk s Bir berberin s nnet etti i, bir Papa n n vaftiz etti i Hasan ibn Muhammed el Vezzan ez Zeyyati, nam di er Giovanni Leone de Medici nin, Leo Africanus yani Afrikal Leo nun z ya am yk s yazm olsayd yazaca gibi Amin Maalouf, bu ilk roman nda daha sonra Semerkant, Tanios Kayas , Do u nun Limanlar ve teki romanlar nda da yapaca gibi tarihle tarihten ola an st bir hal dokuyor Bir u an hal.


10 thoughts on “Afrikalı Leo

  1. Zahrah Awaleh Zahrah Awaleh says:

    Check this out Wherever you are , some will want to ask questions about your skin or your prayers Beware of gratifying their instincts, my son, beware of bending before the multitude Muslim, Jew or Christian, they must take you as you are, or lose you When men s minds seem narrow to you, tell yourself that the land of God is broad broad His hands and broad His heart Never hesitate to go far away, beyond all seas, all frontiers, all countries, all beliefs p.360 Now go and read it


  2. Kelly Kelly says:

    Leo Africanus belongs to several very old traditions of storytelling It is epic, heroic, and, joins a long line of contemporary political commentaries hidden beneath a thin veil of time and space It is a tale based on the life of what we re almost sure is a real historical figure Leo Africanus or al Hassan ibn Muhammad al Wazan as his original name likely was, was a Muslim born in Granada about the time of the Reconquista His story begins with the voices of others, speaking to him, tellin Leo Africanus belongs to several very old traditions of storytelling It is epic, heroic, and, joins a long line of contemporary political commentaries hidden beneath a thin veil of time and space It is a tale based on the life of what we re almost sure is a real historical figure Leo Africanus or al Hassan ibn Muhammad al Wazan as his original name likely was, was a Muslim born in Granada about the time of the Reconquista His story begins with the voices of others, speaking to him, telling him who he is we follow his family into the large exile community of Granadans in Fez, Morroco, and then, slowly, follow Hasan himself as his story graduaally starts to become his own We re given a rich, wonderfully filled out picture of the Mediterranean and North Africa at the turn of the 16th century from Al Andalus to the Maghrib, from Timbuktu to the Sahara, downtown Cairo to wild independent mountain territories of Africa, Barbary pirate controlled port towns to Ottoman Constantinople, to Italy in the prime of the Renaissance This is the great strength of the book The reader is given a muchrounded picture of this era than is often typical in the West one that does not care what the hell Christopher thinks he can find in the West Indies, or the martial squabbles of Henry of England Maalouf is excellent at showing us a world balanced and mixed between East and West, where it was a very real possibility that a Sultan might rule in Rome, or the Castilians might decide to create an empire in North Africa Each little place visited has it s own proud history that matters very much and who are you over there to think that yours mattersHe does a wonderful job at showing us how absolutely meaningless any kind of border we create is, whether physical or mental What s great about Leo Hasan whoever he is at the moment is that he seems both the essence of his time, in the thick of each development, and yet an escapee from history, able to look like many different people, have many different names as with all exiles lit, this book is all about the names while remaining himself despite it all Maalouf s addition to the beatitudes isBlessed are the outsiders,a blessing that his main character is both tortured and exonerated by It is hard not to be moved by Maalouf s movingly expressed ultimate mission of tolerance and peace especially when we know that the 40 years of bloody, pointless, absurd conflict that Leo Africanus witnesses is a stand in for an ongoing contemporary conflict that has lastedthan 40 years now and shows no signs of stopping Despite being published in 1986, this book remains, sadly, as relevant today as the day it was published.However And it s a very unfortunate however I do have to detract some points for the technical construction of this novel It is an epic, as I said, and since it is trying to give us a history of 40 years of this area of the world, our main character is required to be in a lot of places and meet a lot of people We re never in one place for very long, which for one thing makes the story rather disjointed and underdeveloped, and for another a real person would need a miracle to make it happen And so he gets miracles Lots of them His progress is frankly ridiculously unbelievable It requires every other person he meets to take a special liking to him, and give him amazing gifts, money, opportunities that allow him to progress to the next unbelievable meeting he sees everyone from Raphael of Urbino and Pope Leo to the Ottoman Sultan, the pirate Barbarossa, and kings from lands near and far Unfortunately, our character is not at all developed one assumes due to time constraints in getting him all over Africa and Europe so we have no idea why he s so special, and nor are we given much of a reason to care We are supposed to like him, as he voices a number of modern approved political opinions, but the dispersal of these feels cheap And also, I just have to note, his character does a number of despicable things that are hard to forgive such as repeatedly abandoning his wives and children, and even, on one occasion, having sex with his wife on their wedding night despite the fact that she faints away that the prospect she s quite sheltered and religious When he s taken to task for this by one of his wives, we get some answer about how you just can t tie me down, baby , that s supposed to tie into his exile, rootless nature, but really just reads as a cheap excuse for him to get on with the next scene of his life, since Maalouf has said all he wants to say involving the particular storyline that woman is a part of There are one or two developed characters Hasan Leo s best friend Hurun, for example, one of his wives, and at one point his father who serves asof a representative sample, but it still works , but these are picked up and put down as our Hero needs them to continue on I love exile lit, don t get me wrong, but it is at it s most powerful where we believe that the main character is exiled from something this particular character doesn t seem to have much of a stake in anything he s able to abandon each thing as necessary and we rarely see him carry over any wounds from one book of his story to another It doesn t help that the story is told in a very impersonal tone, a tone that struck me as fairly unbelievable most of the time after all, the story is meant to be him writing down his life for his young son and only in the and here s the message, kids, interludes between the volumes of his story do we see any of that like the author himself sometimes forgets his format I didn t feel at all emotionally attached to this book, and I really wanted to It s just such a shame.This book should ve either been much longer, or found a way to give us it s messages without the Where s Waldo round Maalouf he had to write before he could make the kind of universal statements he wanted to make here In the end, I felt like I was being called to witness something when what I really wanted and what he gave us in those all too brief glimpses was to get to know someone who had witnessed, and survived


  3. Leo Africanus Leo Africanus says:

    So good, I changed my name by deed poll.


  4. Sue Sue says:

    Leo Africanus is a wonderfully realized, imaginary autobiography of one Hasan of Granada, driven from Spain along with his family at the time of the Inquisition From there his life was to follow the edges of the Mediterranean in a tale that covers the years from his birth in 1488 through the end of his writing in 1527 He lands in Fez with his family, travels to Timbuktu, Tunis, Constaninople and Cairo He is involved in education, in trade, suffers horribly and also has wonderful gains perso Leo Africanus is a wonderfully realized, imaginary autobiography of one Hasan of Granada, driven from Spain along with his family at the time of the Inquisition From there his life was to follow the edges of the Mediterranean in a tale that covers the years from his birth in 1488 through the end of his writing in 1527 He lands in Fez with his family, travels to Timbuktu, Tunis, Constaninople and Cairo He is involved in education, in trade, suffers horribly and also has wonderful gains personally and professionally.And then he is taken by pirates and shipped to Rome where he becomes a gift of the Pope, Pope Leo X Thus he becomes Leo Africanus of the title.And what a story Leo tells The history of the Mediterranean cultures of his time, it is all there to be seen through his eyes and experience Maalouf makes you feel that Hasan Leo lived, breathed as you or I There is one passage in particular that I want to add to the review Wherever you are, some will want to ask questions about your skin or your prayers Beware of gratifying their instincts, my son, beware of bending before the multitude Muslim, Jew or Christian, they must take you as you are, or lose you When men s minds seem narrow to you, tell yourself that the land of God is broad broad His hands and broad His heart Never hesitate to go far away, beyond all seas, all frontiers, all countries, all beliefs. p 360 I will keep this book on my shelf along side my copy of Samarkand and hopefully read them both again But first I will seek out other works by the author.Highly recommended 4.5


  5. Kavita Kavita says:

    Joannes Leo Africanus alias al Hasan ibn Muhammad al Wazzan al Fasi whew, that name is longer than mine was a 16th century traveller, diplomat, and geographer, whose works became quickly famous and for a long time, were a source of information in Europe about the Islamic kingdoms to the East and Africa Both European and African, Christian and Muslim, Leo was a fascinating man with a fascinating life He s a subject not many have tackled before, so full kudos to Amin Maalouf for taking it on Joannes Leo Africanus alias al Hasan ibn Muhammad al Wazzan al Fasi whew, that name is longer than mine was a 16th century traveller, diplomat, and geographer, whose works became quickly famous and for a long time, were a source of information in Europe about the Islamic kingdoms to the East and Africa Both European and African, Christian and Muslim, Leo was a fascinating man with a fascinating life He s a subject not many have tackled before, so full kudos to Amin Maalouf for taking it on Leo Africanus is written in four parts Granada, Fez, Cairo, and Rome, the four homes of Leo From his birth till the Sack of Rome, covering a period of around 40 years, Maalouf follows Leo from city to city, country to country, continent to continent It s a history rich narrative that really focuseson the tumultuous events of the 16th century than on Leo It s evocatively done, and you get a very good sense of not just how these events panned out, but also daily life in Muslim and Christian lands of the time Maalouf s research is extensive and he has a pretty good understanding of his historical subjects But as not much is known about Leo, beyond what he himself had written in his works, the author had to fill in the blanks He indulges in literary licence to a large extent while doing this The plot regarding his sister s ordeals appear to be all made up, and serveas a way to express how certain things operated than to take forward Leo s story I haven t been able to find out that Harun Pasha existed at all There were many such instances in this book, and they were designed to give arounded understanding of life then.So despite all the amazing things in this book, it lacks one major component emotion Leo keeps travelling on and on, and his relationships with places appearevocative than those with people around him The man runs through multiple wives moving from one to the other with remarkable ease Though the book is written as a note to his son, Leo simply doesn t appear to have much of a relationship with his children either The part covering his childhood was better in this respect, but as he grew up, these relationships faded away from the picture.I think this might have worked so much better in a different format, similar to Elena Ferrante s Neapolitan Novels With multiple books, Leo might actually have got some character development, and the missing pieces suitably filled Nevertheless, this is a very good book and I would highly recommend it to anyone


  6. Laura Laura says:

    Although the premise of this book based on the travels of the actual Leo Africanus was what drew me to it, it really suffered from a disjointed plot Leo s travels are what makes him unique he is one of the few historical figures who demonstrated the blend of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian faiths around the fall of Granada Yet the reader gets almost no sense of the society in which he fits His numerous travels seem to have no connection to one another and the characters around him suffer fro Although the premise of this book based on the travels of the actual Leo Africanus was what drew me to it, it really suffered from a disjointed plot Leo s travels are what makes him unique he is one of the few historical figures who demonstrated the blend of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian faiths around the fall of Granada Yet the reader gets almost no sense of the society in which he fits His numerous travels seem to have no connection to one another and the characters around him suffer from a serious case of being two dimensional I kept reading to try and see what I was missing, figuring it was me who just wasn t getting into the story enough or not paying enough attention Well, having finished it, I realized that it wasn t my fault as a reader, there simply just wasn t enough of a plot to hold the book together Which is a crime, as the travels of this man could certainly have filledthan the scant 300 pages of the book Leo Africanus life is one of the most perfect out of history to be turned into historical fiction and it s upsetting that it was botched so badly


  7. Ms.pegasus Ms.pegasus says:

    Reading Amin Maalouf s book is a bit like viewing McArthur s Universal Corrective Map of the World In that map, north is at the bottom and south at the top In addition Asia and the Pacific Ocean are in the center It s a jarring inversion of perspective In the world history class I took in college, the key figures were Ferdinand and Isabella, Charles V, and Martin Luther The overarching theme was the rise of the nation state Maalouf s narrative is through Muslim eyes His protagonist is a c Reading Amin Maalouf s book is a bit like viewing McArthur s Universal Corrective Map of the World In that map, north is at the bottom and south at the top In addition Asia and the Pacific Ocean are in the center It s a jarring inversion of perspective In the world history class I took in college, the key figures were Ferdinand and Isabella, Charles V, and Martin Luther The overarching theme was the rise of the nation state Maalouf s narrative is through Muslim eyes His protagonist is a cosmopolitan polyglot, a self described citizen of nowhere and everywhere, born in 1494 as Hasan ibn Muhammad al Wazzan In his world political boundaries blur and change with alarming rapidity In his world the salient entities are enclaves of displaced refugees Jews, Conversos, Granadans, Circassians, Berbers, Arabs, and Genoans and the trade routes connecting Mediterranean ports and cities threading the passes of the Atlas Mountains, the oases of the Sahara, and the centers of the Songhai Empire in west Africa covering present day Mali and Ghana Maalouf offers no maps in this book Perhaps that is intentional In this world locales like Sijilmassa, Ouarzazate door of the desert , Tabalbala, and the Taghaza salt mines are as familiar as Timbuktu, Fez, Cairo and Rome A map would only serve to reinforce our preconceptions about the importance and continuity of these places when the narrative is a succession of accelerating discontinuities Actual polities had blurred boundaries determined by the fortunes of warfare and the purses of warlords, constantly struggling to pay their armies This was the world of Hasan ibn Muhammad al Wazzan, Hasan the Granadan, baptized by Pope Leo X as Jean Leon de Medici, and now known by his pen name Leo Africanus.The book is written in the guise of a memoir addressed to Guiseppe born in Rome or Yusuf if the Arabic version is preferred, Hasan s son It is divided into four sections The Book of Granada 1489 1494 , The Book of Fez 1495 1513 , The Book of Cairo 1513 1519 , and the Book of Rome 1519 1527 Within each section, the chapters are labeled by year according to the Muslim lunar calendar Despite this straight forward chronological progression, the historical events are disorienting Few western readers will be familiar with the key actors in Hasan s life How many of you are familiar with Boabdil Muhammad XII, exiled Sultan of Granada , Muhammad the Portuguese Mohammed al Burtuqali, Sultan of Fez , Al Ashraf Tumanbay Tumanbay II, the last Sultan of Cairo , or Salim the Grim Salim I, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Suleiman the Magnificent may strike afamiliar chord, but possibly only in the context of his defeat at the gates of Vienna in 1529 Yet, each of these men had a distinct personality and political agenda that affected the course of history.My cursory reading of the first two sections caused me some initial confusion Many of the events pre date Hasan s birth others occur during his early childhood He tells the story through the vantage point of his mother Salma, his father Muhammed, and his maternal uncle Khali, and the first person point of view is not spoken in his own voice His voice assumes the narration as he reaches adolescence He develops friendships with two unlikely boys as a student, the clever Harun the Ferret, and the enigmatic Ahmad the Lame One He encounters and represses his first sexual stirrings with his half sister Mariam He is estranged from his father and only develops sympathy for his predicament far into his adult years These domestic travails are folded into Hasan s observations in a caravan where he accompanies his maternal uncle Khali However, Maalouf avoids the exoticism of a travelogue, although he does relate some fantastical stories gleaned from some of the people they encounter Instead, Maalouf s novel derives much of its flavor from Hasan s shrewd observations He describes Ferdinand s advance after taking possession of the AlhambraA major war unfolded, which the Muslims could not win, but which, if they could not have avoided, they could at least have delayed It was to last ten years and end in the most ignominious manner possible In addition, it was accompanied by a bloody and demoralizing civil war, so often the fate of kingdoms on their way to extinctionp.18 He reflects on the intellectual decline precipitated by civil warAnd then came the drying up of the Spirit and of the pen To defend themselves against the ideas and customs of the Franks, men turned Tradition into a citadel in which they shut themselves up Granada could only produce imitators without talent or boldnessp.37 Maalouf displays his gift for storytelling through the voices of his characters Hasan s father Muhammed describes the unease during Boabdil s reignOn this autumn day, the yellowing leaves weresecurely attached to the trees than the notables of Granada to their monarch The city was divided as it had been for years, between the peace party and the war party, neither of which called upon the sultanp.24 Maalouf imbues Hasan with a quiet but steady moral compass Despite his political instincts which favor an Ottoman victory that would free Granada from Spanish dominion, he warns his hosts in Cairo of an impending Ottoman attack in order to secure the lives of his Circassian wife and her son Bayezid, a descendant of the Ottoman royal lineage.In Rome he is able to reconcile his Islamic beliefs with those of his Christian hosts, finding common though uncomfortable ground with even his student Hans, an enthusiastic proponent of Martin Luther Later, Pope Clement VII probes his religious beliefsWould not religion have been the best of all ways of life for a man of learning and education like yourselfHasan respondsTo speak of religion in the Holy Father s presence is like speaking of one s fianc e in her father s presencePressed, he continuesIf the head of the Church was not listening to me, I would say that religion teaches men humility, but that it has none itself I would say that all religions have produced both saints and murderers, with an equally good conscience That in the life of this city, there are the Clement years and the Adrian the preceding pope, an intolerant zealot and former inquisitor years, between which religion does not allow you to choose.Muslims learn that the best of men is the most useful to mankind but in spite of such words, they sometimes honour false zealotsthan real benefactorsp.329 For Maalouf, humility is the foundation of religion.This was not an easy book to read I spent a great deal of time looking up the historical characters and events in order to gain some context His prose iscontemplative than dramatic Even an episode about his new bride Fatima elicitsintellectual mirth than outright laughter Nevertheless, this is an important book written by an author who has thought deeply about the way we view history and our responsibility to a humanistic outlook.NOTES is an interesting examination of the perspective of an upside down map.http pen international.org news in an interview with the author, conducted in 2014http authorscalendar.info maalouf.htm provides a succinct profile of the author


  8. Wanda Wanda says:

    6 MAR 2016 Asma connected me to another book about Leo Many thanks, Asma Trickster Travels SEP 2016 5 star fabulous Reading about Leo s adventures reminded me a bit of Walter Mitty could Leo really have been in all these places, met all these people, and experienced all he wrote about Or, perhaps, he built upon others stories and experiences Either way, the reading and writing are breathtaking 6 MAR 2016 Asma connected me to another book about Leo Many thanks, Asma Trickster Travels SEP 2016 5 star fabulous Reading about Leo s adventures reminded me a bit of Walter Mitty could Leo really have been in all these places, met all these people, and experienced all he wrote about Or, perhaps, he built upon others stories and experiences Either way, the reading and writing are breathtaking


  9. Mounir Mounir says:

    Beautiful, imaginative, enjoyable to read.


  10. Lia Lia says:

    Overall, this one was a good reading experience except for when Leo started to talk about his relationship with his lovers In different format of story telling what he was revealing probablyacceptable, but in this book, the intended reader supposed to be his Son I could not believe peoples in Leo s life time revealing so much about their intimate relationship to their son, however close the father and son bond was.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *