La Place de l’Étoile PDF/EPUB ☆ La Place ePUB



10 thoughts on “La Place de l’Étoile

  1. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    I couldn t quite believe this was a Patrick Modiano novel I had to keep checking the cover thinking there had been some sort of mistake La Place de l toile reads nothing like some of his later work, and could even be seen as a homage to the ranting and raving of Louis Ferdinand C line Could Patrick Modiano really be so blatantly offensive Well, he is here Maybe Michel Houellebecq learnt a thing or two from reading this The mood of melancholy and loneliness from something like In the Caf I couldn t quite believe this was a Patrick Modiano novel I had to keep checking the cover thinking there had been some sort of mistake La Place de l toile reads nothing like some of his later work, and could even be seen as a homage to the ranting and raving of Louis Ferdinand C line Could Patrick Modiano really be so blatantly offensive Well, he is here Maybe Michel Houellebecq learnt a thing or two from reading this The mood of melancholy and loneliness from something like In the Caf of Lost Youth is absolutely nowhere in sight here It s easy to see why he became the new modish and hip writer of the time in the late 60s, as Modiano abandons the well constructed values of the traditional novel and goes forof a free form, free spirited, frenetic kind of style And I have to say, I really liked it, even though there were times when I wondered just what the hell was going on It s like he took so much of France s 19th and 20th century history and literature, threw it all in a blender, with whatever else took his fancy, and turned the contents into a novel It s main focus might be France under occupation, but it s simply like no other WW2 novel I ve read at all It s a novel of collaborations, betrayals, Eva Braun, Dreyfus, bad faith, anti semitism, raucous behaviour, just to name a few things, all centred around the neurotic episodes of a Jew turned Nazi sympathizer called Raphael Schlemilovitch He is, like some of Nabokov s narrators, unreliable, brought onso by Modiano s really clever ending in Freud s Vienna consulting room


  2. Vicky "phenkos" Vicky "phenkos" says:

    4.5 stars.I was at once troubled and fascinated by this book Like Paris Nocturne, which I read recently, the narrative is disjointed and meanders around a small number of key themes, in this case, Jewishness, Frenchness, the German occupation of Paris, resistance, collaboration, self doubt and self hatred Nightmarish and compulsive, this is not a narrative that endorses heroic, black and white notions of good and evil resistance good, collaboration bad , but relentlessly explores what it woul 4.5 stars.I was at once troubled and fascinated by this book Like Paris Nocturne, which I read recently, the narrative is disjointed and meanders around a small number of key themes, in this case, Jewishness, Frenchness, the German occupation of Paris, resistance, collaboration, self doubt and self hatred Nightmarish and compulsive, this is not a narrative that endorses heroic, black and white notions of good and evil resistance good, collaboration bad , but relentlessly explores what it would have been like to have been a Jew in France in the fateful years between 1940 and 1945 To have been arrested by the Gestapo, taken to the notorious rue Lauriston where the Gestapo headquarters were, to have then been saved from Auschwitz by the skin of one s teeth with the help of Gestapo collaborationists Which is what happened to Modiano s father Perhaps the whole book is an extended meditation on what happened to that father inside rue Lauriston, an attempt to bring this evanescent experience into a now that the son wishes he could relive, yet cannot relive fully.The book opens in a kind of Marquis de Sade way not in the sense that there are orgies or sexual debauchery but in the sense that the narrator seems to be all too happy to shed his Jewish identity in exchange for another that of the anti Semite commentator who rubs shoulders with those who despise Jews and align themselves with the regime the p tainistes But there is no sense of loss in this exchange, it happens quite matter of factly, indeed the narrator seems peculiarly untouched by the drama of those around him The themes of collaboration and French supremacy dominate this part of the novel the narrator s closest friends are a French aristocrat and a former Jewish collaborationist who forged fake papers when the war was over.Internalised Jew hatred is an important theme throughout the book French intellectual life, the French aristocracy, everything French is glorified, and the narrator fantasises about being a boy from a good, provincial family, about to embark on a degree at the cole Normale Sup rieure But instead of staging the ultimate coming to consciousness, the Jew becoming aware of his identity and destiny, Modiano turns the tables on this whole way of thinking the young Jew becomes the last defender of staunch French tradition in the face of opposition and ridicule from his native French schoolmates He beats them up.At places, the book reminded of an old film starring Bruce Willis that some of you may have seen The film was called Twelve Monkeys and has the character played by Bruce Willis stuck in a kind of time loop Each time he thinks he s escaped the loop, the horrors come back and he finds himself trapped again That s precisely what happens in this book The main character escapes, takes on new identities, even travels to Israel after the war, only to find himself back at the hands of the Gestapo, en route to rue Lauriston, about to be tortured, shot at the back of the head with a bullet by people who are themselves Jews, collaborators of the SS.I read the book in one sitting it was that gripping But I wouldn t describe it as in any way enjoyable Towards the end I flicked though the pages as fast as I could, partly because I couldn t stop and partly because I wanted this to come to an end as soon as possible This book is certainly not for everyone But if you do decide to read it, be prepared for a novel experience where sterotypes and familiar tropes are left behind


  3. Roger Brunyate Roger Brunyate says:

    Hero of Hallucination La Place de l toilewas Modiano s first novel, but I would not recommend it first to the new reader It is brilliant, but with that particularly French brilliance of a young intellectual writing to astound older intellectuals, punching his card as a member of the closed circle, yet turning their sacred shibboleths to his own profane ends It is far removed in style from any of the other six short novels of his that I have read since Modiano won the Nobel Prize, books disti Hero of Hallucination La Place de l toilewas Modiano s first novel, but I would not recommend it first to the new reader It is brilliant, but with that particularly French brilliance of a young intellectual writing to astound older intellectuals, punching his card as a member of the closed circle, yet turning their sacred shibboleths to his own profane ends It is far removed in style from any of the other six short novels of his that I have read since Modiano won the Nobel Prize, books distinguished by their relative modesty and by action that takes place in dark Parisian corners reluctant to give up their secrets.Nothing dark about the Place de l toile, though, that hub of haute monde Paris standing proudly on its hill with the gleaming white Arc de Triomphe in the middle But Modiano is brilliant with titles, and this one has a sinister second meaning that the author explains in an epigraph In June 1942, a German officer approaches a young man and says to him Excuse me, sir, where is the Place de l toile The young man points to the left side of his breast.Alas, the pun is untranslatable, since nobody speaks of the Parisian landmark as the Place of the Star But there is also something splendidly defiant about the bitter joke if the young man is not Jewish, he is criticizing the German racial laws if he is, he risks his life This splendid defiance, so unlike the author s other novels, is the defining feature of this one.Modiano was born in 1945 His father, a Jew, survived the Occupation, it is thought by turning his underworld contacts to the service of the Gestapo The son s other novels mostly take the form of noirish investigations into mysteries that go back to the Occupation But there is nothing dark or mysterious about this one at all It is a cry of outrage hidden in a firework display of youthful exuberance It is a picaresque tale tossed on the wildest flights of the imagination It is a headlong carnival ride through geography and history, following the young narrator, Rapha l Schlemilovitch, Jew par excellence Now fabulously wealthy, then poor, then rich again, he finds success as author, soldier, alpinist, and lover, at one point becoming the bedmate of Eva Braun and Hitler s closest companion, his Official Jew Very little of it takes place in Paris, let alone the Place de l toile of the title, but Rapha l visits America, the Gironde, Vienna, and Tel Aviv, living in luxury hotels, kibbutzim, or cloistered abbeys The book is embroidered with so many names literary or historical real, fictional, or repurposed that a translation would require almost as many footnotes as text I can t claim to have picked upthan a small fraction of the references, but only to have read it for the sheer dizziness of the author s fantasy And I certainly cannot summarize the book half as well as Modiano himself, in the brief preface that I attempt to render here The narrator, Rapha l Schlemilovitch, is a hero of hallucination Around him, in delirious trajectories, a myriad lives which might be his own intersect on orbits of stirring fantasy A thousand contradictory identities whirl in a verbal mania where the Jew is sometimes king, sometimes martyr, hiding his tragedy with buffoonery So we see personages both real and fictional Maurice Sachs and Otto Abetz, L vy Vend me and the doctor Louis Ferdinand Bardamu, Brasillach and Drieu la Rochelle, Marcel Proust and the killers of the French Gestapo, Captain Dreyfus and the P tainist admirals, Freud, Rebecca, Hitler, Eva Braun, and countless others, like figures on a carousel spinning madly through space and time But the place of the star, the closed book, is inscribed at the exact centre of the capital of pain


  4. Jan Rice Jan Rice says:

    Send up a parody an act of imitation in order to ridicule someone or something or cut them down to size satire, burlesque, lampoon, caricature, mockery Simon Dentith s definition any cultural practice which provides a relatively polemical allusive imitation of another cultural production or practice pulled from the Wikipedia entry and Google online dictionaryThat s what this book is a send up on steroids It s Modiano s first book, published in 1968, when he was 23 He takes ever Send up a parody an act of imitation in order to ridicule someone or something or cut them down to size satire, burlesque, lampoon, caricature, mockery Simon Dentith s definition any cultural practice which provides a relatively polemical allusive imitation of another cultural production or practice pulled from the Wikipedia entry and Google online dictionaryThat s what this book is a send up on steroids It s Modiano s first book, published in 1968, when he was 23 He takes everything about French antisemitism and the Holocaust that people did not want to talk about and shoves it in their face His character Raphael Schlemilovitch son of a schlemiel embodies every imaginable cultural aspect of antisemitism with in your face manic glee Then, for good measure, at the end he does the same with the new state of Israel and its attitude toward European Jews, according to which Israelis are brave, strong, masculine warriors who deserve to survive and the European survivors are cowardly 90 p0und weaklings.Nothing is to remain hidden and festering The book is a rampage of cauterizing.The characters exist in a frenzy of kaleidoscopic shape shifting Even the person in which the book is told is in flux from I to he and even you At first, I was Wha what I started to catch on and go a little faster, which helped, but then, after 30 or so pages, I discovered the notes to the cultural references at the end I slowed down to look at them, and that was a problem I began to get bored I made it to p 61 and decided to speed up, damn the references, and that was the ticket The book is a fever dream and needs to be read as such I knew a lot of the references anyway, or at least general feelings Seems that s what I ve been reading up on for the last 10 or 12 years How many general American readers have read a biography of Heine and a novel by Edmond Fleg in recent years People don t like this book so much I saw the opinions of some of my friends Guess the later books are different this was the first, and he was not only discharging his rage but finding his voice sort of like Stephen King at the first of his Dark Tower series, which he started in college not that I m comparing King to Modiano.This is the second book in a row in which the author was born the same year I was, the other being Susan Jacoby, whose review I haven t gotten to yet When you read someone born the same year you know what was going on Modiano was over in France still, makes for ease of comparison and contrast He sure knew a lotthan I did at that age Here, in my life, the genteel silence persisted If it was being exploded, I didn t know Took me decades longer.Don t know how to rate Still a little shell shocked.I have the trilogy and have now made it through the first


  5. Anders Anders says:

    A bizarre, bitingly sarcastic look at what it means to be a French Jew, delivered with a kaleidoscopic array of cultural and historical inputs Most prominent among them are the German occupation, France s literary tradition and a series of Jewish role models that the main character alternately imitates fawningly and rejects in disgust Chronology and plot are cast aside altogether, as the hero Schlemilovitch acts the playboy billionaire, the Third Reich s top Jew, the lyc e bully, the sensiti A bizarre, bitingly sarcastic look at what it means to be a French Jew, delivered with a kaleidoscopic array of cultural and historical inputs Most prominent among them are the German occupation, France s literary tradition and a series of Jewish role models that the main character alternately imitates fawningly and rejects in disgust Chronology and plot are cast aside altogether, as the hero Schlemilovitch acts the playboy billionaire, the Third Reich s top Jew, the lyc e bully, the sensitive young writer and the white slaver in no particular order It s precisely the unconventional narrative style that makes this portrait of a wounded, alienated, and deeply split psyche so compelling, helped along by the author s wicked sense of humour


  6. John John says:

    A bizarre story A satire of the Nazi occupation Raphael Schlemilovitch is a young Jewish man who both loves and hates himself The Place of the Star is where the story partly takes place We really do not who Raphael is A Venezuelan heir to a fortune, a white slave trader or someone institutionalized for paranoid delusions The story is well written and mixes real people with his narrative I came away perplexed but perhaps reading the other two parts of the trilogy would help to understand w A bizarre story A satire of the Nazi occupation Raphael Schlemilovitch is a young Jewish man who both loves and hates himself The Place of the Star is where the story partly takes place We really do not who Raphael is A Venezuelan heir to a fortune, a white slave trader or someone institutionalized for paranoid delusions The story is well written and mixes real people with his narrative I came away perplexed but perhaps reading the other two parts of the trilogy would help to understand what the author is trying to say Parts of it are funny and I liked the quote When I hear the word culture, I reach for my truncheon What the story does through satire is lay bare the hypocrisy of occupied France


  7. Isabelle Isabelle says:

    This is one of the great books of my life, written by Patrick Modiano when he was barely 20, his first book This is a quest of identity through being Jewish, or actually not quite so Jewish The narrator Rafael goes through a hallucinatory journey within himself but also with the who s who of Jewish culture, Freud and Eva Braun, for instance I experienced this book like a punch in the stomach I felt so relieved that someone out there could put into words the sort of confusion I felt about bei This is one of the great books of my life, written by Patrick Modiano when he was barely 20, his first book This is a quest of identity through being Jewish, or actually not quite so Jewish The narrator Rafael goes through a hallucinatory journey within himself but also with the who s who of Jewish culture, Freud and Eva Braun, for instance I experienced this book like a punch in the stomach I felt so relieved that someone out there could put into words the sort of confusion I felt about being almost Jewish


  8. Rhys Rhys says:

    A brilliant but ultimately depressing novel that is a fantasia of frustrated revenge, self loathing and ironic bitterness concerned with the German occupation of France during WWII and the murderous treatment of the Jewish people and the desperate cynicism of the collaborators I have rarely read a novel filled with such barely controlled anger, but this anger is used as a motive force to embark on a wild flight of fantasy, part memoir, part grandiose daydream, part nightmare, which is by turns A brilliant but ultimately depressing novel that is a fantasia of frustrated revenge, self loathing and ironic bitterness concerned with the German occupation of France during WWII and the murderous treatment of the Jewish people and the desperate cynicism of the collaborators I have rarely read a novel filled with such barely controlled anger, but this anger is used as a motive force to embark on a wild flight of fantasy, part memoir, part grandiose daydream, part nightmare, which is by turns savage, masochistic, melancholy, fatalistic and rebellious This novel is a satire but one that owesto Celine who is mercilessly parodied throughout than to any humourist Certainly I will readModiano in the future, probably the next two volumes of the Occupation Trilogy , of which this is the first, but I need to pause for breath first.


  9. Jonathan Widell Jonathan Widell says:

    The book displays, and demands, a tremendous knowledge of historical events and persons which one may or may not look up somewhere if one is not fortunate enough to be already familiar with them A story of different Jews at different times in modern history under different circumstances and tied together with the psychoanalysis done under someone who is taken for Sigmund Freud Where is the aesthetics though At no point was the book an engrossing or even enjoyable experience.


  10. Kelsey Kelsey says:

    Prior to this, I had not read any books by Modiano I knew that he has a preoccupation with the Vichy past of France, and I was expecting a dark meditation on that period Instead, I was confronted with a strangely humorous though still dark text set decades after the war, following a young Jewish man and his fantasies, which include reimagining himself as a Nazi collaborator even as the lover of Eva Braun Schlemilovich inhabits anti Semitic stereotypes in a way that allows the author to la Prior to this, I had not read any books by Modiano I knew that he has a preoccupation with the Vichy past of France, and I was expecting a dark meditation on that period Instead, I was confronted with a strangely humorous though still dark text set decades after the war, following a young Jewish man and his fantasies, which include reimagining himself as a Nazi collaborator even as the lover of Eva Braun Schlemilovich inhabits anti Semitic stereotypes in a way that allows the author to lampoon them and confront the historical reality of French anti Semitism, something that at the time of publication was not widely acknowledged The Gaullist myth of a country full of Resistance fighters was easier to stomach, but Modiano gleefully tears down that fantasy The young protagonist also positions himself in relation to French intellectual history The book is especially a nod to Proust with themes like the idealized childhood, the passage of time, the fluidity of memory In some ways, this book brought to mind Michael Chabon s work, such as The Yiddish Policemen s Union Beautifully written and provocative, c est lire


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La Place de l’Étoile ❰Download❯ ➾ La Place de l’Étoile Author Patrick Modiano – Thomashillier.co.uk Au mois de juin , un officier allemand s avance vers un jeune homme et lui dit Pardon, monsieur, o se trouve la place de l Etoile Le jeune homme d signe le c t gauche de sa poitrine Au mois de juin , un officier allemand s avance vers un jeune homme et lui dit Pardon, monsieur, o se trouve la place de l Etoile Le jeune homme d signe le c t gauche de La Place ePUB ½ sa poitrine.