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The Librarian at Play [Download] ➾ The Librarian at Play By Edmund Lester Pearson – Thomashillier.co.uk The Librarian At Play, By Edmund Lester Pearson Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive We are republishing The Librarian at Play, By Edmund Lester Pearson Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

  • Kindle Edition
  • 114 pages
  • The Librarian at Play
  • Edmund Lester Pearson
  • English
  • 16 September 2018

About the Author: Edmund Lester Pearson

Edmund Lester Pearson was an American librarian and author He was a writer of the true crime literary genre He is best known for his account of the notorious Lizzie Borden murder case wikipedia.



10 thoughts on “The Librarian at Play

  1. Debbie Zapata Debbie Zapata says:

    Edmund Lester Pearson was a librarian and author From 1906 to 1920 he wrote a column for a Boston newspaper, which is where these fourteen essays and sketches came from I do hope Project Gutenberg publishes his two other collected library column titles someday because these were hilarious I also would be interested in reading the books he wrote on true crime Supposedly he is most famous for his essay about Lizzie Borden at least that is what Wiki says.But back to The Librarian At Play Usua Edmund Lester Pearson was a librarian and author From 1906 to 1920 he wrote a column for a Boston newspaper, which is where these fourteen essays and sketches came from I do hope Project Gutenberg publishes his two other collected library column titles someday because these were hilarious I also would be interested in reading the books he wrote on true crime Supposedly he is most famous for his essay about Lizzie Borden at least that is what Wiki says.But back to The Librarian At Play Usually in a book like this there are a few duds, but I enjoyed each and every offering, from The Gardener s Guide what will our hero the librarian do with his exciting new book and all those packets of seeds to A Literary Meet Olympic Games for literary characters a fencing match between Cyrano de Bergerac and D Artagnan a football game with Achilles as captain on one side and Hamlet on the other Hamlet was constantly fretting whether to punt or not to punt There were two related pieces about collectors One man had a literary zoo, with many of the animals mentioned in certain books There were a number of tigers, including, of course, the ill natured Shere Khan The one in the second cage, said my guide, is one of those hunted by Mr Isaacs, when he was after a tiger skin to present to Miss Westonhaugh But perhaps the most interesting of all was one which, so Mr Gooch told me, had been confined in a cage beside a lady s apartment, to await the opening of a door by a young man But Mr Gooch was unable to tell me whether the man opened the door of the Lady or the Tiger.In the other collector piece, Mr Gooch s brother makes fun of the literary zoo, but shows our narrator around his own armory, which has many of the weapons mentioned in certain books He had the rapier which had belonged to Laertes careful, there is still poison on the tip and the crossbow used by the Ancient Mariner to kill the albatross, among many other items.There were a few pieces with similar themes showing how hectic the front desk of a library can get, and one that must be every librarian s dream Called Their Just Reward, it showed what could happen to those patrons who abuse their library books, or those people who buy books by the yard just to have a pretty display in a room Our narrator was on a tour of Bad Book User Hell, it seems I liked best the punishment for a person who borrows books from anyone and never returns them As we passed them I shuddered to see that they were all engaged in filing catalogue cards in alphabetical order. Surely the prospect of 25 to 30 years in Card Catalogue Purgatory would help inspire a reader to return a borrowed book My favorite essay here was By Telephone, about a newly installed phone line at our narrator s library This line was to be used to call in a research question, and the clerk on duty had all sorts of reference volumes handy to answer whatever question might come up But of course there are always unexpected questions, you know What tickled me about this piece was the mention of the clerk reciting the poem Curfew Must Not Ring Tonight into the telephone It reminded me of my favorite Katharine Hepburn movie, Desk Set Hepburn gives a wonderful recitation of that poem in the movie, so it was fun to imagine her as the library clerk And of course now I want to rush off and watch that movie for the umpteenth time Thanks for reminding me, Mr Pearson

  2. Mellen Mellen says:

    This lovely rare book by Edmund Lester Pearson is a compilation of his writing for a newspaper column called The Librarian printed in the Boston Evening Transcript These specific columns are of a fictional nature that reflect on the nature of librarians and librarianship One of my favorites is the first, called The Interest Gauge In this story a salesman comes to a small public library selling little gauges that can be attached to the back of books to show the interest and attention of the pr This lovely rare book by Edmund Lester Pearson is a compilation of his writing for a newspaper column called The Librarian printed in the Boston Evening Transcript These specific columns are of a fictional nature that reflect on the nature of librarians and librarianship One of my favorites is the first, called The Interest Gauge In this story a salesman comes to a small public library selling little gauges that can be attached to the back of books to show the interest and attention of the previous reader Naturally scholarly texts on German philosophy show low ratings and true crime stories show high ratings, despite the protestations of readers.Another of my favorite stories is By Telephone, which tells the story of a public library which gets its first telephone and therefore provides telephone reference service Hilarity ensues as librarian and patron alike struggle with the new technology a story not so different from today.This book also includes an index which is particularly hilarious

  3. Herman Gigglethorpe Herman Gigglethorpe says:

    Many of the jokes didn t work for me, but those that did were good enough to salvage a 3 star ranking.Any American librarian or archivist would be all too familiar with the genealogists in hell featured in one of the stories As far as I know, there s no Grand Dames of the Pequot War , though we get plenty of people wanting ancestors for Daughters of the American Revolution chapter The long line for Pocahontas descendants is especially funny, since probably 75% of white Americans claim her a Many of the jokes didn t work for me, but those that did were good enough to salvage a 3 star ranking.Any American librarian or archivist would be all too familiar with the genealogists in hell featured in one of the stories As far as I know, there s no Grand Dames of the Pequot War , though we get plenty of people wanting ancestors for Daughters of the American Revolution chapter The long line for Pocahontas descendants is especially funny, since probably 75% of white Americans claim her as an ancestor.Other annoying patrons in this book include those who want a book, but can t remember the author, title, or even the subject matter If you re lucky they might know what color the cover is The dreaded red book is a running joke at my library

  4. Rex Libris Rex Libris says:

    From 1911, this book is a very humorous treatment of library life It is a collection of vignettes about librarians and patrons, including the introduction of telephone reference, working at branch library, and tour of Hell where people are grouped by the geneology issues they presented to librarians Also elaborated on were a zoo made up of the actual animals from books, and an armory full of weapons from books.A must read for all librarians.

  5. Fred Fred says:

    Librarian humor Poking fun at librarians, book collectors, library patrons, books, writers and collectors of literary artifacts.

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