The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of


    The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of the people of the Western world the economic patterns they lived in, and the politics, culture, and society that they created as a result As he did in Albion s Seed and Paul Revere s Ride, two of the most talked about history books in recent years, Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with wonderfully evocative writing to create a book for scholars and general readers alikeRecords of prices are abundant than any other quantifiable data, and span the entire range of history, from tables of medieval grain prices to the overabundance of modern statistics Fischer studies this wealth of data, creating a narrative that encompasses all of Western culture He describes four waves of price revolutions, each beginning in a period of equilibrium the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and finally the Victorian Age Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent the only time in Europe s history that the population actually declinedFischer also brilliantly illuminates how these long economic waves are closely intertwined with social and political events, affecting the very mindset of the people caught in them The long periods of equilibrium are marked by cultural and intellectual movements such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Age based on a belief in order and harmony and in the triumph of progress and reason By contrast, the years of price revolution created a melancholy culture of despairFischer suggests that we are living now in the last stages of a price revolution that has been building since the turn of the century The destabilizing price surges and declines and the diminished expectations the United States has suffered in recent years and the famines and wars of other areas of the globe are typical of the crest of a price revolution He does not attempt to predict what will happen, noting that uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition Rather, he ends with a brilliant analysis of where we might go from here and what our choices are now This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of the world today."/>
  • Paperback
  • 552 pages
  • The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History
  • David Hackett Fischer
  • English
  • 22 December 2018
  • 019512121X

10 thoughts on “The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History

  1. Anna Sheehan Anna Sheehan says:

    Whenever anyone looks at the world and sees that everything is falling apart the top half percent of the top one percent own 98 percent of everything the governments are corrupt or ineffectual, allowing policies that only reinforce the status quot the environment is crumbling as millions of species and every single Eco system suffers from pollution and climate change, respectively, stemming from the very policies that reinforce the status quot of the top one percent of global money sultans Whenever anyone looks at the world and sees that everything is falling apart the top half percent of the top one percent own 98 percent of everything the governments are corrupt or ineffectual, allowing policies that only reinforce the status quot the environment is crumbling as millions of species and every single Eco system suffers from pollution and climate change, respectively, stemming from the very policies that reinforce the status quot of the top one percent of global money sultans it is refreshing and comforting to know that we ve gone through all this before.Many, many times.David Fischer s book spells this all out with irrefutable facts and easy to assess charts, impeccable research, and a clever and occasionally humorous narrative structure, the durable consumer goods in medieval Europe were armor, and thus made to make adurable consumer I nearly dropped the book I laughed so hard that, despite all the statistics, makes it easily accessible to both the educated and the layman in economics.And at the end of each of these economic ages, Fischer points out, when the people have been pushed so close to the margins that the smallest disaster causes utter collapse, it is nice to know that a period of stability arises from the ashes of economic societal ecological disaster These are the eras with kings who have the great pasted after their names These are the stable times when war, though it may exist in pockets, does not plunge the world into chaos, and population levels stabilize, architecture, art and technology are cherished, and education thrives It is nice to see that it has happened before It will happen again It is happening before our eyes.Here it is again Ride the wave


  2. Shira Shira says:

    There were many interesting older sources, particularly in French, but I was unable to find copies of the books because they are so old, unfortunately I would especially have liked to see the old French compilations on the economy of the Middle East and Summerian areas in the ancient world But, what strikes me as most important about this book is simply the lack of Anglophone access to the academic works on long term economic history which seem to be taken for granted by French, Spanish and Ge There were many interesting older sources, particularly in French, but I was unable to find copies of the books because they are so old, unfortunately I would especially have liked to see the old French compilations on the economy of the Middle East and Summerian areas in the ancient world But, what strikes me as most important about this book is simply the lack of Anglophone access to the academic works on long term economic history which seem to be taken for granted by French, Spanish and German speakers How do we get not only inter disciplinary studies but also multi lingual studies to be given aprominent place in Anglophone academia Shira


  3. Justin Rodger Justin Rodger says:

    An empirical study of price history from 1200 to 2000 with 4 waves occurring separated by the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and the Victorian era The main idea is original and a great lens to look at broad history through A bit dry at times as it refers to sources and comparative studies extensively.


  4. David David says:

    Great read It s like This Time is Different, but going back to around 1200AD I d say This Time is Different isrigorous but The Great Wave also provides a financial perspective on history which makes it worthy of a read for the interested.


  5. Vikas Erraballi Vikas Erraballi says:

    I haven t read the 4th Turning, because it seemed a bit too sensationalist for my taste If my understanding of that book s argument is correct, this one comes to similar conclusions from the prism of price waves 20 years from time of publication, I don t get the sense we ve really had the blow off required to set into a new equilibrium The statistics, Gini coefficients, don t support it Maybe crime or family formation showpositive trends I don t think they do.Which means the real cra I haven t read the 4th Turning, because it seemed a bit too sensationalist for my taste If my understanding of that book s argument is correct, this one comes to similar conclusions from the prism of price waves 20 years from time of publication, I don t get the sense we ve really had the blow off required to set into a new equilibrium The statistics, Gini coefficients, don t support it Maybe crime or family formation showpositive trends I don t think they do.Which means the real crash lies ahead And then we get a rosy decade or century Read with The Three Body Problem Author also suggests an agent based modeling framework without probably realizing it, or at least something similar Read with Bookstaber s End of Theory.Read with The Sovereign Individual Then go get yourself a farm or hedge social fabric dissolution in whatever way seems best to you


  6. Fred R Fred R says:

    Tantalizing, but frustratingly under theorized The connection with social dysfunction was particularly interesting, but, again, he doesn t really explore the why s and wherefore s The process looks vaguely Malthusian although my impression is that he s too quick to dismiss the monetarist explanation , but if it is so, there s muchthat could be said, such as how, exactly, rising productivity interacts with the Malthusian dynamic But instead of thinking about that issue, Fischer just tel Tantalizing, but frustratingly under theorized The connection with social dysfunction was particularly interesting, but, again, he doesn t really explore the why s and wherefore s The process looks vaguely Malthusian although my impression is that he s too quick to dismiss the monetarist explanation , but if it is so, there s muchthat could be said, such as how, exactly, rising productivity interacts with the Malthusian dynamic But instead of thinking about that issue, Fischer just tells us that people starved to death less in the downswings because of various welfare laws This is as superficial as his castigations of Reagan, whose tenure as President was nowhere near long enough to have anything to do with the macro historical trends discussed.I feel obliged to point out that although the book is 500 pages, 250 of those pages are appendices and endnotes Now that I m thinking about it again, I can t really believe how far this book falls short of what it could have been On the other hand this seems to be a common complaint in the reviews I put up here on Goodreads


  7. Hoofar Hoofar says:

    I had this book for a while and stopped reading after the first 50 pages It s not an exciting book to read even if you are a history nerd like me One day, by accident, I found and read paul krugman s Pop Internationalism And that was a super easy one week read and made me want to go back and re read this book I think that s the way to read it This is a 500 page book, heavy read with lots of plots, unique historical observations theories to expand on each one The original base idea is si I had this book for a while and stopped reading after the first 50 pages It s not an exciting book to read even if you are a history nerd like me One day, by accident, I found and read paul krugman s Pop Internationalism And that was a super easy one week read and made me want to go back and re read this book I think that s the way to read it This is a 500 page book, heavy read with lots of plots, unique historical observations theories to expand on each one The original base idea is simple makes sense price revolution high inflation is usually followed by a war crisis until everything, including wages and prices, finds a new equilibrium David Fischer studies Europe for the past seven centuries and identifies four of these cycles back to back and each time there is a lot of references as he tells the story Every idea theory by itself is generously clearly described but he doesn t care much to explain his thought process He is overfitting at times and there are many social, cultural and economic ideas that he overextends with too much conviction and little doubt The connection between different ideas is missing in the book, which would probably add another 500 pages I understand but he doesn t even care to question anything he says and towards the end you ll see he has a big model with little prediction to give away


  8. CD CD says:

    The quantification of history.A work that covers sociology, economic, political science, and most of the social disciplines along with history Both a weakness and a strength in this particular work Some of the analysis is dated The writing on inflation is overly reliant on the pre Neo Keynesian models of the inflation phenomena Attempts by the author to clarify the liberal conservative trends in this crucial area are weak.The price wave trends as a rhythmic or cyclic though the author tri The quantification of history.A work that covers sociology, economic, political science, and most of the social disciplines along with history Both a weakness and a strength in this particular work Some of the analysis is dated The writing on inflation is overly reliant on the pre Neo Keynesian models of the inflation phenomena Attempts by the author to clarify the liberal conservative trends in this crucial area are weak.The price wave trends as a rhythmic or cyclic though the author tries to discount this behavior is dependent upon overly fussy definition of time frames If viewed over a wider range or with different statistical tools, stats the boon and bane of modern econ a different picture might emerge.That there exists the volume of historical data about pricing not really costs is the true contribution of this work The bibliography and notes are great resources if many of the conclusions drawn have flaws.Could have been a much better andreadable work with minor alterations This type of analysis has a a tendency to become quickly dated The data and historical records are not the problem, just the details of the conclusions


  9. Carl Carl says:

    A fascinating study of price fluctuations on basic necessities since the Renaissance There have been four great waves of price inflation, each one leading to increased inequality, instability social revolution followed by periods of stability, equalization, progress Signs indicate we are presently in the 4th wave of instability but the author feels the outcome cannot be predicted Good stuff which nicely complements Piketty s work A fascinating study of price fluctuations on basic necessities since the Renaissance There have been four great waves of price inflation, each one leading to increased inequality, instability social revolution followed by periods of stability, equalization, progress Signs indicate we are presently in the 4th wave of instability but the author feels the outcome cannot be predicted Good stuff which nicely complements Piketty s work


  10. Rudyard L. Rudyard L. says:

    This is easily one of the best history books of all the time It s the equivalent of being able to look at the machinery that propels the cycles of history It provides a picture clear representation of the issues currently facing the modern world It is simply revolutionary to the field of economics.


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The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History❴PDF / Epub❵ ✅ The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History Author David Hackett Fischer – Thomashillier.co.uk David Hackett Fischer, one of our most prominent historians, has garnered a reputation for making history come alive even stories as familiar as Paul Revere s ride, or as complicated as the assimilati David Hackett Fischer, one of our most prominent Wave: Price ePUB ☆ historians, has garnered a reputation for making history come alive even stories as familiar as Paul Revere s ride, or as complicated as the assimilation of The Great PDF \ British culture in North America Now, in The Great Wave, Fischer has done it again, marshaling an astonishing array of historical facts in lucid and compelling prose to outline a history of prices the history Great Wave: Price PDF/EPUB Â of change, as Fischer puts it covering the dazzling sweep of Western history from the medieval glory of Chartres to the modern day Going far beyond the economic data, Fischer writes a powerful history of the people of the Western world the economic patterns they lived in, and the politics, culture, and society that they created as a result As he did in Albion s Seed and Paul Revere s Ride, two of the most talked about history books in recent years, Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with wonderfully evocative writing to create a book for scholars and general readers alikeRecords of prices are abundant than any other quantifiable data, and span the entire range of history, from tables of medieval grain prices to the overabundance of modern statistics Fischer studies this wealth of data, creating a narrative that encompasses all of Western culture He describes four waves of price revolutions, each beginning in a period of equilibrium the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and finally the Victorian Age Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent the only time in Europe s history that the population actually declinedFischer also brilliantly illuminates how these long economic waves are closely intertwined with social and political events, affecting the very mindset of the people caught in them The long periods of equilibrium are marked by cultural and intellectual movements such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Age based on a belief in order and harmony and in the triumph of progress and reason By contrast, the years of price revolution created a melancholy culture of despairFischer suggests that we are living now in the last stages of a price revolution that has been building since the turn of the century The destabilizing price surges and declines and the diminished expectations the United States has suffered in recent years and the famines and wars of other areas of the globe are typical of the crest of a price revolution He does not attempt to predict what will happen, noting that uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition Rather, he ends with a brilliant analysis of where we might go from here and what our choices are now This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of the world today.


About the Author: David Hackett Fischer

David Hackett Fischer is University Professor and Earl Wave: Price ePUB ☆ Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University His major works have tackled everything from large macroeconomic and cultural trends Albion s Seed, The Great Wave to The Great PDF \ narrative histories of significant events Paul Revere s Ride, Washington s Crossing to explorations of historiography Historians Fallacies, in which he coined the term Historian s fallacyHe is best known for his major study, Albion Great Wave: Price PDF/EPUB Â s Seed, which argued that core aspects of American culture stem from several different British folkways and regional cultures, and the Pulitzer Prize winning Washington s Crossing Pivotal Moments in American History , a narrative of George Washington s leadership of the Continental Army during the winter of during the American Revolutionary WarHe is currently at work on a biography of Samuel de Champlain, a French explorer and founder of Quebec City.