Download ☆ Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York By Adam Gopnik – Thomashillier.co.uk

Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York Not Long After Adam Gopnik Returned To New York At The End Of With His Wife And Two Small Children, They Witnessed One Of The Great And Tragic Events Of The City S History In His Sketches And Glimpses Of People And Places, Gopnik Builds A Portrait Of Our Altered New York The Changes In Manners, The Way Children Are Raised, Our Plans For And Accounts Of Ourselves, And How Life Moves Forward After Tragedy Rich With Gopnik S Signature Charm, Wit, And Joie De Vivre, Here Is The Most Under Examined Corner Of The Romance Of New York Our Struggle To Turn The Glamorous Metropolis That Seduces Us Into The Home We Cannot Imagine Leaving


10 thoughts on “Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York

  1. says:

    I ve heard a very good friend of mine use the term dabblerthan once That term fits Adam Gopnik very well He s a writer for The New Yorker and will seemingly write about anything that catches his attention or, possibly, that he s been assigned to write about Though he s been writing for the magazine for thirty years now, and perhaps he chooses his own assignments Anyway, his modus operandi seems to me to be to cover a subject, but not dig very deeply into it.Through the Children s G I ve heard a very good friend of mine use the term dabblerthan once That term fits Adam Gopnik very well He s a writer for The New Yorker and will seemingly write about anything that catches his attention or, possibly, that he s been assigned to write about Though he s been writing for the magazine for thirty years now, and perhaps he chooses his own assignments Anyway, his modus operandi seems to me to be to cover a subject, but not dig very deeply into it.Through the Children s Gate is a book about New York City primarily Manhattan and a New York City that he knows Nothing necessarily wrong with that, but it seems to cover a fairly narrow scope One problem with Through the Children s Gate is that many of the essays are simply not very interesting Mr Gopnik writes a lot about his family primarily about his children and that ends up being close to the experience of people showing you photographs of their children The photos mean a lot to them, probably not so much to you.When he steps away from writing about his family, there are other problems That Sunday is a revisiting of a Sunday gig at the Village Vanguard in 1961 by the Bill Evans Trio that was recorded It s well known in jazz history, but it seems strange to me that someone would write about that gig when John Coltrane was blowing the roof off the Vanguard later that year in gigs that were recorded And when Ornette Coleman s groups at the Five Spot around that time were changing the ways that many musicians played jazz and the ways that many listeners heard and listened to the music I guess that Bill Evans music ispalatable to the average New Yorker reader than Trane s or Ornette s.When Mr Gopnik writes about his friend Kirk Varnedoe, an art historian and teacher, he focuses on descriptions of Mr Varnedoe coaching a team of eight year old football players, which included Mr Gopnik s son The article certainly humanizes Kirk Varnedoe that s a fine thing but it generally ignores his teaching and writing, which I wanted to knowabout Instead I learned about his football coaching skills interesting and humanizing but there obviously wasto the man than that.Through the Children s Gate seems like a book that was cobbled together from previously written articles simply to make a book not always a good thing, and in this case, definitely not.My favorite bit of writing in the book was an epigraph Interviewer Sir, How do you survive in New York City What do you eat Sid Caesar as The Wild Boy Pigeon.Interviewer Don t the Pigeons object Sid Caesar Only for a minute. from Your Show of Shows attr Mel Brooks edit I did enjoy reading Gopnik s Paris to the Moon Now I m not sure if it actually was a good book or if the fact that I ve never been to Paris just made it a piece of exotica to me


  2. says:

    I received this book from a friend when, after years of living in NYC, I finally left and nobody could believe it I ve always noticed that about NY I lived there since I was 17 everyone complains and dreams of moving out, but no one believes anyone would actually do it though people do, constantly So I kept the book, through a move to the West and then here to Europe, without ever reading it I d read with enjoyment a few of Gopnik s pieces in The New Yorker but for the most part, I ju I received this book from a friend when, after years of living in NYC, I finally left and nobody could believe it I ve always noticed that about NY I lived there since I was 17 everyone complains and dreams of moving out, but no one believes anyone would actually do it though people do, constantly So I kept the book, through a move to the West and then here to Europe, without ever reading it I d read with enjoyment a few of Gopnik s pieces in The New Yorker but for the most part, I judged this to be a yuppy, overly privileged Woody Allen sort of thing look how happy my love is, I live in the best city in the world Well, it sort of is and sort of isn t For starters, the whole book is under the unavoidable shadow of 9 11 which changed everything forever, as I know since I was there and my then boyfriend now husband worked 2 blocks away Gopnik s handling of this delicate shadow is moving and realistic Also, the Gopnik s New York is a lived in New York, an experienced one, of the adult, the parent, the husband It s not the NY you see via Hollywood movies or TV shows take any Friends episode, and nothing in it is true where 30 something hold implausible jobs, wear unaffordable clothing and live in non existent apartments Having walked the streets mentioned by Gopnik and having shared those experiences as a woman, a mother, a wife I related completely and I could feel it, sense it, see the city On the other hand, there are two minuses that prevent me from giving the book 4 stars one, there s little mention of the other NY the stress, the narrowness, the crap for your money equation Even when you re past that stage and can afford not to deal with it daily, it s still there, always, somewhere in the back And two, Gopnik s writing is uneven He s no Joan Didion, for eg There are incredibly lyrical and thought provoking passages with some incredibly bogged down, hard to read ones.In all, however, it works I m looking forward to trying his first book now, about Paris


  3. says:

    Adam Gopnik writes for the New Yorker, but since I don t read that magazine, I first encountered him when I read Paris to the moon , his collection of essays about his family s years living in Paris first himself and his wife, and then the two of them and the children they had while they lived there I loved that book, although it s interesting to me to note that the only part of it I really remember is the section on their experience of the French health system as they were going through his Adam Gopnik writes for the New Yorker, but since I don t read that magazine, I first encountered him when I read Paris to the moon , his collection of essays about his family s years living in Paris first himself and his wife, and then the two of them and the children they had while they lived there I loved that book, although it s interesting to me to note that the only part of it I really remember is the section on their experience of the French health system as they were going through his wife s first pregnancy I love travel writing of this type the we moved there and this is what we experienced type of writing, and it s actually not common to find good writing in the genre there are manypeople traveling and writing about their travels than there are people who have the talent to actually say something interesting about their travels The reluctant Tuscan by Phil Doran comes to mind as an example of a moving to Italy story that should have been left unwritten Anyway, I loved Paris to the moon, so when I learned that Gopnik had a new book out I marched right over to Queen Anne Books and bought it in hardcover, no less I wasn t all that engaged with the book at first The title and description of the book implied that it was going to focus on the experience of moving back and living in NYC with children, but it s another collection of essays, may of them clearly published for the New Yorker, and several of them have nothing to do with Gopnik s children or even the experience of being parents of children in NY The first three essays one about 19th century writer, one about Gopnik s relationship with his psychiatrist, and one about Gopnik s explorations into the world of Judaism that he was only nominally raised in left me almost regretting that I had bought the book But then he began to actually write about what he was observing in his life and the life of the city around him and the book gotcompelling The essays about living in the city in the wake of 9 11 were really good and by the end of the book I was regretting that it was done, although I found the last essay to be weak almost a forced attempt to live up to the introduction, which talked about the Children s Gate into Central Park there apparently are designated gates into the park, including a children s gate Still, this is one of the better books I read during the first few months of the year, and I can actually imagine myself re reading some of the essays, so this one will find a spot on the travel memoirs shelf


  4. says:

    Journalist Adam Gopnik reflects over a period of a few years on his return to New York from Paris with his young children The reflections cover his personal life, cultural trends, and the changes to the city.His children experience imaginary friends, chess, Yu Gi Oh , baseball, heelies, fantasy games, goldfish, and IM He tells of his good friend Kirk as he declines with cancer, and yet coaches a flag football team of young boys as well as giving a series of lectures on modern art.He touches on Journalist Adam Gopnik reflects over a period of a few years on his return to New York from Paris with his young children The reflections cover his personal life, cultural trends, and the changes to the city.His children experience imaginary friends, chess, Yu Gi Oh , baseball, heelies, fantasy games, goldfish, and IM He tells of his good friend Kirk as he declines with cancer, and yet coaches a flag football team of young boys as well as giving a series of lectures on modern art.He touches on experiences with specific New York City places and experiences such as psychoanalysis, Central Park, Times Square, The Listening Post, switch hotels, noise, and the reaction to 9 11.He also brings ingeneral cultural trends like the decline of department stores and independent specialty stores in favour of chain boutiques like The Gap, Victoria s Secret, and Starbucks He touches on the way parents get involved in their children s school activities like plays on the exercise trends running for men and yoga for women and on the adult s social interaction through a game called Mafia.I enjoyed all aspects of this book, and even though I have only visited New York and never lived there, I appreciate both its uniqueness and its similarity to other places.Highly recommended


  5. says:

    This was also a library sale find I find Gopnik s writing dense but also cant put him down A classic New Yorker writer There were a couple of laughs out loud and I enjoyed the chance to follow his children s, especially his son Luke s, growing up And his own life lessons as well.


  6. says:

    Oh Adam Gopnik How in love I once was with you How amazed I was with your facility to dig into layers of everyday life and come up with wise genius How many times did I read aloud to friends your original New Yorker Bumping Into Ravioli essay I still may be in love with you, but this book tested my love, much like Cupid tested Psyche I turned on the light to see you and you ran away, leaving only a poorly edited, slapped together published collection of essays to remember you by You even Oh Adam Gopnik How in love I once was with you How amazed I was with your facility to dig into layers of everyday life and come up with wise genius How many times did I read aloud to friends your original New Yorker Bumping Into Ravioli essay I still may be in love with you, but this book tested my love, much like Cupid tested Psyche I turned on the light to see you and you ran away, leaving only a poorly edited, slapped together published collection of essays to remember you by You even messed with my beloved Ravioli Why would you do such a thing And perhaps, Adam, I still love you but choose not to love one of your books That is indeed possible It may, Adam, not even be your fault, as this tome is so New York as to be inconceivable to one who doesn t love New York as you do Which I categorically do not.Don t get me wrong, Adam I read the whole thing And I found many phrases and thoughts to be ponder worthy Sadly, some of those phrases and thoughts were repeated, almost verbatim, in different essays, a fault that lies not with you, perhaps, but with your editors Or with your publishers, who put you on deadline.But even in this slipshod collection of words, your amazing clever wisdom peeks out every once in a great while In my experience, at least, it is the liberal parents who tend to be the most socially conservative the most queasy at the endless ribbon of violence and squalor that passes for American entertainment,concerned to protect their children from it One might have the impression that it is the Upper West Side atheist and the Lancaster County Amish who dispute the prize for who can be most obsessive about having the children around the table at six p.m for a homemade dinner from farm raised food The art of child rearing, of parenting, is to center the children and then knock them off center to make them believe that they are safely anchored in the middle of a secure world and somehow also to let them know that the world they live in is not a fixed sphere with them at the center that they stand instead alongside a river of history, of older souls, that rushes by them, where they are only a single small incident To make them believe that they can rule all creation, while making them respect the malevolent forces that can ruin every garden That is the task Childhood is just like life, only ten times faster We didn t make the children fly We simply lowered the heavens and told them they were flying, as we always do In conclusion, Adam, I choose to still love you I will lay this book aside and convince myself to still gasp in excited anticipation when I see your name affixed to an article in the New Yorker table of contents I will give you a second chance And, probably, a third chance, too, if need be Because I know how good you can be


  7. says:

    J P Donleavy once wrote a hilarious novel titledA Fairy Tale of New YorkAdam Gopnik s masterpiece could be just as aptly titled He has, however, chosen a somewhatprosaic title while letting the content of his non fiction work read very much like the title of Donleavy s opus.While Gopnik s story is solidly a New York story of both the people and the place , it s equally a story about bringing up children in the city that never sleeps even if they do Whether the city itself c J P Donleavy once wrote a hilarious novel titledA Fairy Tale of New YorkAdam Gopnik s masterpiece could be just as aptly titled He has, however, chosen a somewhatprosaic title while letting the content of his non fiction work read very much like the title of Donleavy s opus.While Gopnik s story is solidly a New York story of both the people and the place , it s equally a story about bringing up children in the city that never sleeps even if they do Whether the city itself contributes in a measurable way to their development is, of course, anyone s guess It could well be that with their privileged genetic inheritance, they were simply meant to become the extraordinary children the author makes them out to be But Adam Gopnik, himself, has no doubt played a critical role in their development, and we have him to thank and admire for the end result.As a parent, myself, of two rather creative children, I felt and feel a certain kinship with Adam Gopnik and fully expect our progeny to one day share a communal spotlight.In the meantime, I thank him for an extraordinary read It has been a long time since I could honestly say of a book that I didn t want it to end I say that now without qualification aboutThrough the Children s Gateand urge not only would be parents, but also appreciative readers to open their eyes, minds and hearts to this gift of a book.RRB10 11 12


  8. says:

    The taxi has its checkered lore, the subway its legend, and the Town Car a certain Michael Douglas in Wall Street icon quality but if there is a memorable bus scene in literature, or an unforgettable moment in a movie that takes place on a New York City bus, I have not found it it isn t that buses are intrinsically inimical to symbolism The London bus has a poetry as rich as the Tube s there is Mary Poppins, there is Mrs Dalloway In Paris, Pascal rides the bus, Zazie dreams of riding the The taxi has its checkered lore, the subway its legend, and the Town Car a certain Michael Douglas in Wall Street icon quality but if there is a memorable bus scene in literature, or an unforgettable moment in a movie that takes place on a New York City bus, I have not found it it isn t that buses are intrinsically inimical to symbolism The London bus has a poetry as rich as the Tube s there is Mary Poppins, there is Mrs Dalloway In Paris, Pascal rides the bus, Zazie dreams of riding the Metro, and that is, evenly, that In L.A., Keanu Reeves rides the bus, round and round in desperate Dennis Hopper driven circles But as a symbolic repository, the New Yo4rk City bus does not exist The only significant symbolic figure that the new York bus has had is Ralph Kramden, and what he symbolizes about the bus is being stuck in one isform of comic frustration and disappointment the bus is exactly the kind of institution that would have Ralph Kramden as its significant symbolic figure


  9. says:

    When it s good, it s SO good But when it s not, it s SO boring Gopnik s writing can be breathtakingly beautiful when he hits the mark, but it can also be mindnumbingly dull when he misses More hit than miss with this one, but still too many too long rambles.I really enjoyed Paris to the Moon, but haven t read it in years I m wondering now if I felt this way about that one then.I do love his use of words and the love he has for his family, especially his kids really comes through And being a When it s good, it s SO good But when it s not, it s SO boring Gopnik s writing can be breathtakingly beautiful when he hits the mark, but it can also be mindnumbingly dull when he misses More hit than miss with this one, but still too many too long rambles.I really enjoyed Paris to the Moon, but haven t read it in years I m wondering now if I felt this way about that one then.I do love his use of words and the love he has for his family, especially his kids really comes through And being able to read about the NYC places I visited was a treat I just wish he didn t get lost on endless tangents so often


  10. says:

    I was not familiar with Adam Gopnik s work it has been years since I regularly read The New Yorker I thought that this book was going to readlike a memoir when it actually is a collection of essays some tied together by the stories of his children Others felt a bit disjointed I did enjoy reading about his son and daughter and their lives in post 9 11 NYC, and loved the sensitivity with which he wrote of their childhood views of life I also found his insightful observations of New I was not familiar with Adam Gopnik s work it has been years since I regularly read The New Yorker I thought that this book was going to readlike a memoir when it actually is a collection of essays some tied together by the stories of his children Others felt a bit disjointed I did enjoy reading about his son and daughter and their lives in post 9 11 NYC, and loved the sensitivity with which he wrote of their childhood views of life I also found his insightful observations of New Yorkers at that surreal time very compelling Overall, there was much to like in this collection and I will certainly read Paris to the Moon