The Lecturer's Tale PDF/EPUB ↠ The Lecturer's PDF \


  • Paperback
  • 400 pages
  • The Lecturer's Tale
  • James Hynes
  • English
  • 10 February 2019
  • 0312287712

10 thoughts on “The Lecturer's Tale

  1. Kathrina Kathrina says:

    This was probably not the best choice of reading material as I begin the steps towards graduate school but I m certainly nowalert The first chapter is about the best piece of writing I ve read in years, and the tale spins out from there in wildly unpredictable ways Suddenly we re jumping off a cliff and falling up, reminding me of LaValle s Big Machine, beginning with a realistic intro with a dash of fantasy, followed by huge dollops of over the top supernatural fireworks This book alm This was probably not the best choice of reading material as I begin the steps towards graduate school but I m certainly nowalert The first chapter is about the best piece of writing I ve read in years, and the tale spins out from there in wildly unpredictable ways Suddenly we re jumping off a cliff and falling up, reminding me of LaValle s Big Machine, beginning with a realistic intro with a dash of fantasy, followed by huge dollops of over the top supernatural fireworks This book almost lost me in the last 100 pages during the Valentine s party, but the climax brought me home Hynes has thought through every detail of his tale, and begs for close reading Every allusion is real, every name is on purpose Are Nelson s daughters named Clara and Abigail referring to Cane and Abel I m sure of it Is the water stained map of literary England a portent Of course There s enough packed in here for a whole semester of literary queer gender street cred vampire theory, and Hynes tempts you to go that route and then laughs at you, you literary snob, you Some professional reviewers seem to believe Hynes is backing the straight white guy pathos, but I think he s making as much fun of him as he is everyone else I think you ll agree once you see what happens to this major university English department once it loses its library and is chaired by said straight white guy This book has it all, from scenes of fire and brimstone reminiscent of, well, the Bible and The Name of the Rose Including Postscriptto domestic tragedy ala Arthur Miller, and the best part is, Hynes invites you to make these allusions, as he unremittingly makes them himself Thefiction you ve read, theyou ll love it thetheory you ve espoused, theyou ll gnash your teeth It s a wild ride tale with a not so insubstantial moral comment on the relevance of fiction


  2. Amanda Amanda says:

    Part supernatural fantasy and part sharp edged satire of the world of academic English departments This may be one of the first campus novels to take on the plight of adjunct and contingent faculty, or at least one of the first that I ve read This passage in particular, a description of the underpaid composition instructors in the basement of the fictional English department, has stuck with me Above the industrial hum rose the steady murmur of lonely women in their thirties and forties, their Part supernatural fantasy and part sharp edged satire of the world of academic English departments This may be one of the first campus novels to take on the plight of adjunct and contingent faculty, or at least one of the first that I ve read This passage in particular, a description of the underpaid composition instructors in the basement of the fictional English department, has stuck with me Above the industrial hum rose the steady murmur of lonely women in their thirties and forties, their cubicles lined up like sewing machines in a shirtwaist factory In each cubicle a thin woman in thrift shop couture sat earnestly tutoring some groggy student in a point of grammar or the construction of an argument, and each woman looked up at Nelson as he passed with the hollow eyed, pitiless gaze of the damned They combined the bitter esprit de corps of assembly line workers with the literate wit of the overeducated They were the steerage of the English department, the first to drown if the budget sprang a leak They were the Morlocks to the Eloi of the eighth floor And let s just say that I know the university that Hynes fictional university is based on, and while his satire sometimes exaggerates to the point of caricatureat other times, it doesn t exaggerate all that much I laughed, but I also winced in recognition Many times over


  3. Renee Renee says:

    I should love this book The critiques of literary criticism, queer theory, the politics and absurdities of academia, all of that ring very true There are some lovely imbedded references to literature, primarily the hoary old chestnuts of the canon, with a few nods to the New Canon of Tokenistic Inclusion It s self aware and ironic and yet also strangely earnest In short, I should be the audience for this book And yet I ll give it good primarily because rarely does anyone so accurately se I should love this book The critiques of literary criticism, queer theory, the politics and absurdities of academia, all of that ring very true There are some lovely imbedded references to literature, primarily the hoary old chestnuts of the canon, with a few nods to the New Canon of Tokenistic Inclusion It s self aware and ironic and yet also strangely earnest In short, I should be the audience for this book And yet I ll give it good primarily because rarely does anyone so accurately send up a Lit department, and I ve got my own axes to grind on that score It has so much to recommend it, so what s wrong There are plenty of issues the plot is a pastiche of a handful of very well known, canonical tales, for one That s not inherently a problem, especially if you hold to the Campbellian view that there are only the few megamyths But, if you re writing an insider s book, a send up of the sense and sensibilities of a literature department, you should probably expect that some of your audience will not only get your references, but will in fact get there somewhat ahead of you If you re going to be snottily superior about your own erudition and cleverness, then you had better dazzle me, and this just doesn t get it done That s not the worst of its sins, though The big issue for me is that the lead character is a douche due several metric tons of comeuppance And while the author all but transparently tell you that he thinks of old Nelson as a charismatic Gatsby or a Hemingway broken heart or some other allegedly lovable ass and that we should too, the fact that the author has to step forward to tell you that you should love the guy, accept his utter lack of redeeming qualities, and find him charismatic should have been a hint to the author and editors that, as written, he s an alienating jerk to read about, and I for one don t root for him even once after about fifty pages in I don t want to spoiler plot, so I won t get into specifics, but the whole mishmash falls apart under its own preciousness and self congratulation by the third act, and by the end finishing it became the subject ofmorbid curiosity than genuine suspense It starts out an incisive if bitter satire and ends up a paean to the mediocre but entitled middle class white professional man who rages at the world which promised him a kingdom and then told him he had to earn his keep I can t think of anyone whose poor little mes interest me less, or ringfalse.In the final analysis if you re a lit grad student, academic grunt, or disenchanted humanities major, give it a read at least through the first 100 pages for the gleeful calling out of the b.s run amok in literature departments After that, it s your call


  4. Reese Reese says:

    Enter the world of THE LECTURER S TALE after having sunk into your plush desk chair in the grand office reserved for the Chairperson of the English Department at Almost Ivy University You might occasionally chuckle at what you consider clever parodies of the squabbling among factions in an academic community Or you might feel defensive and start a chain of contemptuous responses to the outrageous distortion of what happens in academic communities Enter the world of THE LECTURER S TALE a Enter the world of THE LECTURER S TALE after having sunk into your plush desk chair in the grand office reserved for the Chairperson of the English Department at Almost Ivy University You might occasionally chuckle at what you consider clever parodies of the squabbling among factions in an academic community Or you might feel defensive and start a chain of contemptuous responses to the outrageous distortion of what happens in academic communities Enter the world of THE LECTURER S TALE after having done time there and having decided that you belong elsewhere and you will laugh heartily at James Hynes s representation of that world, and you will empathize with the novel s protagonist You know that you don t have to go to Minnesota, the setting of THE LECTURER S TALE, to spend time in a world just like Nelson Humboldt s You know that you don t have to go to Alaska for a view of a world in which people are rewarded for constructing the verbal equivalent of the bridge to nowhere named SOMEWHERE And you know that this world is not located in THE TWILIGHT ZONE Rod Serling s, that is you don t know Stephenie Meyer s worlds But stay in the world of THE LECTURER S TALE long enough, and you will find that it is not the world that you entered Instead of enjoying a story and, at times, laughing out loud, you realize that Hynes has turned you into oh, crap a theorist preoccupied with questions about who and what really exist Where And when Once you settle those matters, you can move on to asking What ought to exist Or should that question be answered first It s been a few hours since I finished the novel, and the Chicago group in my head is still performing, Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is Cautionary note If you read THE LECTURER S TALE, expect not to get what you expect Then you ll probably appreciate what you get


  5. Marsha Marsha says:

    Bursting at the seams with literary pedantry and pulsing with the bitterness of every thwarted novelist who ever wound up teaching bored and disaffected students, Mr Hynes wittily skewers academia while pointing out what draws students and professors of classical and modern literature to its stagnant marshes In a world where tenure is as coveted as the gold at the end of the rainbow and seemingly as elusive , where faculty battle it out using Shakespearean slang and politically incorrect raci Bursting at the seams with literary pedantry and pulsing with the bitterness of every thwarted novelist who ever wound up teaching bored and disaffected students, Mr Hynes wittily skewers academia while pointing out what draws students and professors of classical and modern literature to its stagnant marshes In a world where tenure is as coveted as the gold at the end of the rainbow and seemingly as elusive , where faculty battle it out using Shakespearean slang and politically incorrect racial slurs, where gender construction, reconstruction and deconstruction muddle every argument, where pressure comes from public and private life, Hynes outlines just how one man can crack at the seams while dancing on a shrinking ice floe.Mr Hynes seems to have done his homework as no stone of vain scholarly pursuits is left unturned He makes fun of the literature while making references to it that any well read lit student will understand His book makes you want to go out and read these famous and not so famous writers, if only to understand some of the pithier passages That both enhances the book and detracts from its pleasures as the reader s mind spins away from the literature and wonders what the gag is However, fantastical moments like a wo man disrobing in a bell tower with a weird silvery sprite creature get bogged down with philosophical rhetoric that reads like a dissertation by an overzealous English Lit student Many passages in the book are like that emotion gets buried under meaningless scholarly dribble The whole moral aspect of Mr Humboldt s magic finger gets lost in a morass of collegiate gabble that only gets cleared up and swept away by an abrupt ending that left this reader a trifle dissatisfied More matter with less art, as the Bard would write, would have suited this book better


  6. Beverly Beverly says:

    I eagerly turned to this book after loving Hynes Next, but I was disappointed Hynes must have been badly burned in the university, allusion intended if you read the book In Next, in an offhand way, he portrays academics as the scorpions that I m sure many are, but in The Lecturer s Tale he goes over the top So this is a broad satire farce with elements of a horror story about the absurdity of English Departments in the 1990s And it was slow reading, full of action but somehow dull, maybe be I eagerly turned to this book after loving Hynes Next, but I was disappointed Hynes must have been badly burned in the university, allusion intended if you read the book In Next, in an offhand way, he portrays academics as the scorpions that I m sure many are, but in The Lecturer s Tale he goes over the top So this is a broad satire farce with elements of a horror story about the absurdity of English Departments in the 1990s And it was slow reading, full of action but somehow dull, maybe because the action was so predictable until the absurd ending.A big problem is that I m not sure about Hynes ear for academic satire, and this book was full of it The example that I m familiar with is Milton Hynes has his super star department head having made his reputation on showing that Satan is the real hero of Milton s Biblical epic, Paradise Lost But this is a very tired old hat argument that no one in any English Department near the turn of the 20th century would be even slightly impressed by I read this book all the way to the end, but it was kind of a waste of time


  7. Slither Slither says:

    This is a clever book The best way to explain is by example in college I had a disliked housemate who was an English major He once wrote a poem in which each line referred to a poem discussed in one of his classes, and the lines were in order So, this poem could only be understood by about a dozen people in the world, who might think it amusing But it was clever.The beginning is very amusing to anyone who has some experience with English academics But then the book falls apart First, This is a clever book The best way to explain is by example in college I had a disliked housemate who was an English major He once wrote a poem in which each line referred to a poem discussed in one of his classes, and the lines were in order So, this poem could only be understood by about a dozen people in the world, who might think it amusing But it was clever.The beginning is very amusing to anyone who has some experience with English academics But then the book falls apart First, the author tells us what characters feel, even though there is no evidence that they do, in fact, feel that And then they do random things Finally, the book descends into nonsense But, the nonsense corresponds to the literary theories that the characters discussed at the start Wow, how clever But not fun to read


  8. Johnathan Alesso Johnathan Alesso says:

    This unusual, wandering tale of the darkest side of university politics is a challenging, yet rewarding read The smoldering, shadowy undertones match the scheming, amoral characters as they resort to the most primitive means to secure themselves tenure The old joke about back stabbing in a university English department is brought to full and literal life in these pages The main character, an irresolute, morally ambiguous, middle aged professor of a Minnesota university uses an unexpected magi This unusual, wandering tale of the darkest side of university politics is a challenging, yet rewarding read The smoldering, shadowy undertones match the scheming, amoral characters as they resort to the most primitive means to secure themselves tenure The old joke about back stabbing in a university English department is brought to full and literal life in these pages The main character, an irresolute, morally ambiguous, middle aged professor of a Minnesota university uses an unexpected magical gift to rearrange departmental politics His general life ennui is pierced by a surprise termination, after which he accidentally cut off his finger Mysterious powers emerge from the accident, and he begin to bend people to his will in pursuit of conflicting personal and altruistic ambitions.The prose has a haunting, ethereal quality to it that hooked me in what would otherwise be an overly lengthy, overly complicated plot I enjoyed the changing atmospheres of the Minnesota seasons, and their fitting backdrop for the drudgery of university underemployment I highly recommend to anyone with a sarcastic take on academia


  9. Christopher Rose Christopher Rose says:

    I m a big fan of campus novels, the best being Russo s Straight Man Hynes The Lecturer Tale comes in at a distant second That s not saying anything bad about Hynes it is just that Straight Man is that good The novel, TLT, follows a lecturer after his three year contract is up at a major institution As he is about to be kicked out of married housing, a freak accident causes him to lose a finger, and when it is reattached, he discovers that he has the ability to impose his will assuming he t I m a big fan of campus novels, the best being Russo s Straight Man Hynes The Lecturer Tale comes in at a distant second That s not saying anything bad about Hynes it is just that Straight Man is that good The novel, TLT, follows a lecturer after his three year contract is up at a major institution As he is about to be kicked out of married housing, a freak accident causes him to lose a finger, and when it is reattached, he discovers that he has the ability to impose his will assuming he touches the person with his finger What follows is a story that navigates all aspects of the university life and English departmentsspecifically division of labor, the way literature positions areprominent than composition, departmental politics, theory vs literature, discussion of canon, bureaucracy of power, gender and academia, and, most importantly in my estimation, the perils of deconstruction.I recommend this book to campus novel lovers and anyone with a passing interest in English studies


  10. Jeff Jeff says:

    This one had a lot of heart I love reading stories about English professors and the state of academia today I respect the author s courage on calling out and doing so muchthan once the effects of modern feminism on education and academic workplaces if not all workplaces and just the ignorant, greedy, and all around unnecessary games that adults will play with each other It s all there But the problem with this book is that the author also has no problem getting randomly lost in This one had a lot of heart I love reading stories about English professors and the state of academia today I respect the author s courage on calling out and doing so muchthan once the effects of modern feminism on education and academic workplaces if not all workplaces and just the ignorant, greedy, and all around unnecessary games that adults will play with each other It s all there But the problem with this book is that the author also has no problem getting randomly lost in his own thoughts, introducing characters that have no relevance to the plot and takes his reader into the ever growing and confusing cyclone with him It s too bad, as this was all radiating with potential, but only delivering a good story and sociological truths only at select intervals that were to few and far between


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The Lecturer's Tale[PDF / Epub] ☆ The Lecturer's Tale Author James Hynes – Thomashillier.co.uk Nelson Humboldt is a visiting adjunct English lecturer at prestigious Midwest University, until he is unceremoniously fired one autumn morning Minutes after the axe falls, his right index finger is se Nelson Humboldt is a visiting adjunct English lecturer at prestigious Midwest University, until he is unceremoniously fired one autumn morning Minutes after the axe falls, his right index finger is severed in a freak accident Doctors manage to reattach the finger, but when the bandages come off, Nelson realizes that he has acquired a strange power he can force his will onto others with a touch of his finger And so he obtains The Lecturer's PDF \ an extension on the lease of his university owned townhouse and picks up two sections of freshman composition, saving his career from utter ruin But soon these victories seem inconsequential, and Nelson s finger burns for even greater glory Now the Midas of academia wonders if he can attain what every struggling assistant professor and visiting lecturer covets tenure The Lecturer s Tale is a pitch perfect blend of satire and horror.


About the Author: James Hynes

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Lecturer's Tale book, this is one of the most wanted James Hynes author readers around the world.