Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the

Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon [EPUB] ✼ Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon Author Jeffrey Kluger – Thomashillier.co.uk In August , one short year after three astronauts had burned to death in their spacecraft, NASA decided that it would launch humankind s first flight to the moon Sixteen weeks later, Frank Borman, Jim In August , one short The Thrilling PDF ☆ year after three astronauts had burned to death in their spacecraft, NASA decided Apollo 8: MOBI :↠ that it would launch humankind s first flight to the moon Sixteen weeks later, Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and 8: The Thrilling ePUB ☆ Bill Anders were aboard the first manned spacecraft to depart Earth s orbit, reach the moon, and return safely to Earth, delivering a tear inducing Christmas Eve message along the way.


About the Author: Jeffrey Kluger

Jeffrey Kluger is a senior The Thrilling PDF ☆ writer for TIME He joined TIME as a contributor in , and was Apollo 8: MOBI :↠ named a senior writer in He has written a number of cover stories, including reports on the connection 8: The Thrilling ePUB ☆ between sex and health, the Mars Pathfinder landing, the loss of the shuttle Columbia, and the collision aboard the Mir space stationIn , Mr Kluger along with two other colleagues, won First Place in the Overseas Press Club of America s Whitman Bassow Award for best reporting in any medium on international environmental issues for their Global Warming cover package April , Prior to joining TIME, he was a staff writer for Discover magazine, where he wrote the Light Elements humor column He was also a writer and editor for New York Times Business World Magazine, Family Circle, and Science DigestMr Kluger is the co author, along with astronaut Jim Lovell, of Lost Moon The Perilous Voyage of Apollo , which served as the basis of the Apollo movie released in He later wrote Journey Beyond Selene, a book about the unmanned exploration of the solar system, and is currently writing a book for Putnam about Jonas Salk and the Polio VaccineMr Kluger is also a licensed attorney, and intermittently taught science journalism at New York University Jeffrey Kluger lives in Manhattan, New York, with his wife and two daughters.



10 thoughts on “Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon

  1. Nancy Nancy says:

    I admit I was space crazy as a girl, and forty nine years later I am still thrilled when reading about the time when dreams came true and men first went into space.Apollo 8 The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger didn t disappoint Although Apollo 8 doesn t have the inherent drama of the Apollo 13 mission, which Kluger and Lovett wrote about, the narrative is engrossing and riveting NASA badly needed a success after the deaths of astronauts Grissom, White, and I admit I was space crazy as a girl, and forty nine years later I am still thrilled when reading about the time when dreams came true and men first went into space.Apollo 8 The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger didn t disappoint Although Apollo 8 doesn t have the inherent drama of the Apollo 13 mission, which Kluger and Lovett wrote about, the narrative is engrossing and riveting NASA badly needed a success after the deaths of astronauts Grissom, White, and Chaffee in 1967 while testing Apollo 1 And so did an America entrenched in a spiraling war, enduring multiple assassinations, and experiencing civic unrest Getting to the moon by 1970, as President Kennedy had challenged, seemedunlikely than ever Apollo 1 and the Saturn V rocket had both failed The Vietnam war was draining our coffers and the space program was losing support NASA had to buckle down and recommit to excellence Gemini 7 astronauts Borman and Lovell were slated to spend fourteen days in space as human lab rats Then came the idea of sending Gemini 6 up after launching Gemini 7, a joint mission that would allow the spacecraft to approach each other to prove that docking could be possible It was just the huge success NASA, and the country needed As I read about Borman and Lovell and Gemini 6 and 7 I remembered my scrapbook with clippings and pages of articles.Next up was Apollo 8, the second manned Apollo mission, which was to orbit the moon in December 1968, paving the way for Apollo 11 and a lunar landing Anders, Borman, and Lovett had sixteen weeks to prepare It was a crazy risk It was so interesting to read about the astronaut s life in space motion sickness, meals, personal needs, illness, accidents, boredom and the wonder of being the first humans to see Earth wholly suspended in the infinite universe This must be what God sees, Borman thought when he saw Earth The amazing astronaut s wives stories are also impressive, accepting the risks of their husband s career and keeping home and children normal in spite of legions of news reporters surrounding their homes.By the time of Apollo 8 my scrapbook days were over But that mission had changed how my generation saw the world, spurring a new environmental awareness Ander s photograph Earthrise was the first to impact Earthling s view of their place in the universe, a lesson was have sadly forgotten This fragile, amazing planet is our home I received a free ebook from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and unbiased review


  2. Carlos Carlos says:

    This book was so interesting, previously my knowledge about space travel was limited to knowing the we did reach the moon but not much elsewhich is funny seeing how much i like science fiction..but this book is the real dealApollo 8 was not the mission that would get to the moon but it would be the first mission that will orbit the moon while manned by three astronauts , this was an extreme important feat before NASA could hope to send men to land in the moon, that privilege would fall to This book was so interesting, previously my knowledge about space travel was limited to knowing the we did reach the moon but not much elsewhich is funny seeing how much i like science fiction..but this book is the real dealApollo 8 was not the mission that would get to the moon but it would be the first mission that will orbit the moon while manned by three astronauts , this was an extreme important feat before NASA could hope to send men to land in the moon, that privilege would fall to Apollo 11 but that is something we are all familiar with it This book will grant you knowledge about the formation of NASA , the political tensions that contributed to it and some aspects of the Cold war in the 1960 s Highly recommend it if you are interested in space exploration but be warned this is a dense work and there are big chapters with no or very small interruptions


  3. Jim Jim says:

    Very well written pop history Kluger also co writeLost Moon The Perilous Voyage of Apollo 13with Astronaut Jim Lovell that the movie Apollo 13 is based on He is a clear fan of the space program and that shows through in this book There is very little here NASA s public relations office would disapprove of It is a straight ahead history of the December 1968 mission of Apollo 8, focusing primarily on Frank Borman, commander of the mission, with a somewhat lesser focus on the other crew Very well written pop history Kluger also co writeLost Moon The Perilous Voyage of Apollo 13with Astronaut Jim Lovell that the movie Apollo 13 is based on He is a clear fan of the space program and that shows through in this book There is very little here NASA s public relations office would disapprove of It is a straight ahead history of the December 1968 mission of Apollo 8, focusing primarily on Frank Borman, commander of the mission, with a somewhat lesser focus on the other crew members Jim Lovell and Bill Anders He also spotlights some of the managers, technicians, and engineers at NASA who made the mission possible, particularly Cris Kraft, Gene Kranz, and Jim Webb Kluger does a nice job with the narrative that does keep you interested throughout If your sole interest is the mission itself and not the messy crap that happens behind the scenes when human beings are involved, this is the book for you It was engrossing in that sense.If you are looking forbehind the scenes stuff, the political and turf wars at NASA, how the Astronauts interacted with each other and with NASA, the finger pointing after the Apollo 1 fire, andthan a superficial look at the private lives of those involved, there isn t too much here.If you are looking for an deeper analysis of Apollo 8 s impact on America and the world, you won t get much of that here either Kluger begins with the assumption that the mission had a positive, even transcendent impact.An example of this is his treatment of the Astronauts famous Christmas message from the moon in which they read passages from the Book of Genesis Kluger treats this as a defining moment in the flight, and doesn t even attempt to question whether it was appropriate In fact Madalyn Murray O Hair, America s most hated atheist, sued the U.S Government claiming it violated the establishment clause of the 1st Amendment And while the suit was dismissed due to lack of jurisdiction, NASA never allowed it to happen again As an atheist myself I have to say I wince a bit when I hear those transmissions, and in my view O Hair had a case But in truth I was not all that bothered by it It was a different time, a dangerous time, and though the passages have no effect on me other than eye rolls , I can see they were welcomed by a weary world at the end of a very bad year In any case, the point is Kluger is not attempting to provoke a debate, or to look at the space program in a wider context He is telling the story of the Apollo 8 flight to the moon, and that s it In this he succeeds admirably If that is all you are looking for, it is well worth a read.Note I listened to the audio version of this book Besides the book, Kluger s recorded interview with Frank Borman is included as well as an edited version of mission transmissions A nice bonus


  4. Lara (Bookish_turtle) Lara (Bookish_turtle) says:

    This was a really well written account of the Apollo 8 mission, offering lots of insight into it s significance, preparation, people involved and the journey as a whole I would highly recommend it to anybody interested in space exploration.


  5. Steve Steve says:

    Outstanding account of the Apollo 8 mission to orbit the moon Extremely well written and captures the intensity and emotion of the times.Highly recommended


  6. Jim Jim says:

    I grew up during the 1960 s It was an eventful time There was the Vietnam war, protests, assassinations, and the Cold War And there was the space race between the United States and Russia President Kennedy had challenged us to put a man on the moon and return him safely before the end of the decade When there was a space launch or splashdown it was an event People stopped what they were doing and watched it on television Many made the trip to Florida to watch the launch in person In bedr I grew up during the 1960 s It was an eventful time There was the Vietnam war, protests, assassinations, and the Cold War And there was the space race between the United States and Russia President Kennedy had challenged us to put a man on the moon and return him safely before the end of the decade When there was a space launch or splashdown it was an event People stopped what they were doing and watched it on television Many made the trip to Florida to watch the launch in person In bedrooms and classrooms there were posters of the moon In school there were model rocket clubs Magazines like Life and Time were filled with stories of the astronauts and the missions.It wasn t all glory and success There was tragedy On January 27, 1967 astronauts Virgil I Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger B Chaffee were killed in a cabin fire that destroyed the Apollo 1 command module during a launch rehearsal test Manned Apollo flights were suspended for 20 months while the accident was investigated The United States badly needed something positive Apollo 8 provided that when it was most needed.The crew on Apollo 8 was Frank F Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders They had originally been slated to fly an Earth orbit in early 1969 but the mission profile was changed in August 1968 Apollo 8 launched on December 21, 1968 It took 68 hours to travel the distance to the Moon and orbited the Moon ten times over the course of twenty hours On Christmas Eve the crew read the first ten verses from the Book of Genesis in a television broadcast which at the time was the most watched TV program ever When the spacecraft came out from behind the Moon on it s fourth orbit they witnessed an Earthrise in person for the first time in human history This event was captured in a color photograph by Bill Anders and has become one of the most famous photographs in history The mission was summed up in a telegram Frank Borman received from a stranger Thank you Apollo 8 You saved 1968.Jeffrey Kluger does an excellent job of providing an inside story of the space program Frank Borman is the central character but you meet many of the astronauts and their families as well as the members of Mission Control It isn t just the story of Apollo 8 or even the Apollo space program You learn about earlier flights during the Gemini missions You learn about some of the less glamorous aspects of space flight Even astronauts get space sick and being sealed in a capsule for long periods can have negative times An excellent story that takes you inside and gives you a glimpse never seen before and brings to life a special time in history.As I write this review we are once again experiencing turbulent times Having read this book I am hopeful that we can experience something as positive


  7. Jeanette Jeanette says:

    This is a pop science read It holds all the bells and whistles of the facts and progressions But for me, it lacked the ambiance between and among The politics of it and also the feel of it I was young then and it was a year I remember well Very well As was the year after In fact, they nearly stand apart like another shore when you are looking across what I d call a life lake that s at least a couple miles wide Like seeing the Chicago skyline from Indiana, you can still at times di This is a pop science read It holds all the bells and whistles of the facts and progressions But for me, it lacked the ambiance between and among The politics of it and also the feel of it I was young then and it was a year I remember well Very well As was the year after In fact, they nearly stand apart like another shore when you are looking across what I d call a life lake that s at least a couple miles wide Like seeing the Chicago skyline from Indiana, you can still at times differentiate the buildings And I find this has all the stuff that was this mission and just before and after But without the true glue that photos for this era topic never seem to expose Most of them just don t Because the feel was immense of being there on the cusp of immense discovery Not just in the Genesis message transmission either even then the atheists detested that and now the humans are not allowed such open expressions just silly trivia conversations but from earliest to latest days of Sputnik to the landings of the next years this feeling reigned And this was a large step that somehow the onus feeling of for the entire nation, maybe most of the world it doesn t grab the adrenaline or the inspirations that WERE Oh did they exist And here they barely show a dimple to what they were You didn t have to be young then either My Dad cried something I had only seen before when someone died Having lived through times that get portrayed in a different shade or context to the era somehow it just colors the whole way too much for me And makes these people and astronauts as almost robot like perfections and heroes of Medal of Honor levels at all times And I don t think they were that at all Nor did the entire operation and facets of it between government, people, scientists etc seem all on the same page as it does glimpse here to this book s eyes But maybe I read too much and it s just that other books have done it so much better The books of that time s and just afterwards of a decadewhen space human travel was left behind I remember those books Some especially describe and combine the reality of those competitions for the first 7 seven Mercury Astronauts picked Others of latter admissions after the accident 3 expired on the pad that I ve read have been so much better And also real toward the constructs complex and often combative I liked the photos included better than the copy by an entire star


  8. Dennis Dennis says:

    3.5 starsFirst of all, it wasn t exactly what I had expected Because of the title and the blurb I thought this would be a book about the Apollo 8 mission It is of course But it takes a long time to get there.It sabout everything that happened with the Space Program from the formation of NACA and later NASA through to the Apollo 8 mission.This turned out to be a good thing Because these were exciting times when we hadn t even been in earth orbit but in no time dreamt up going to the 3.5 starsFirst of all, it wasn t exactly what I had expected Because of the title and the blurb I thought this would be a book about the Apollo 8 mission It is of course But it takes a long time to get there.It sabout everything that happened with the Space Program from the formation of NACA and later NASA through to the Apollo 8 mission.This turned out to be a good thing Because these were exciting times when we hadn t even been in earth orbit but in no time dreamt up going to the moon.The book plunges into the background of a lot of the astronauts and NASA staff Here it all got a little distracting for me While it s clear the author has to make the reader care about the protagonists, there was simply too much of this I lost track a few times who was doing what exactly before they became part of the Space Program Some of this could have been streamlined in my opinion At least a bitfocus on the main characters and maybe one or two other persons would have been nice I don t need to know the r sum of nearly every person mentioned in the book I really don t.Also, while I get that most of these people signed up for defending their country, I simply can t connect at all with their repeatedly mentioned eagerness for taking part in live action War can never be a good thing in my opinion Necessary maybe, but nothing to be excited about So this actually worked against me sympathizing with the protagonists.There are also some parts devoted to the political background at the respective times, focusing on the USA of course This was quite interesting to read So no complaints there But the book is at its best when it focuses on the actual Space Program, the fantastic machines involved, the bravery of the astronauts and the decisive people in command.Being an astronaut is or was a lot of childrens dream I guess After reading Mary Roach s hilarious Packing for Mars maybe one or the other would have changed their mind Because as it turns out life aboard a spacecraft isn t all that pleasant after all And everything you have to endure to get there in the first place really is a grind This book captures this aspect perfectly well It is also very frank about the dangers involved, at a time when space travel was still in its infancy Especially eye opening was one chapter in the early parts of the book, when one of the astronauts told his wife he was going to the moon Something nobody had ever done before She supported her husband without complaining or even questioning But for her own sake she also asked NASA s director of flight operations about the chances her husband would return alive The percentages were quite shocking for me, but nothing she wouldn t expect These women were real heroines themselves in my opinion.Of course some of the early tragedies are also covered in this book Maybe it s a good thing the author doesn t go to deep into the aftermath To me this seemed a respectful way You already knew by then what these wives and children had to go through I like to believe they were very strong people and managed to cope with it somehow.The actual Apollo 8 mission starts around the halfway point And while this was a sensational achievement, it didn t always feel like the apex of this book How exciting it must have been, when we still dared to reach for the stars Sometimes the author manages to capture this Sometimes he doesn t.I think this book should have been a five star read, because of the fascinating story it has to tell But it wasn t Sometimes the author strayed too far from the Space Program and it became kind of a grind.I m still sitting a bit on the fence whether to give it 3 or 4 stars But I m going with my gut feeling and round down to 3 stars for now.Knowing what to expect of it, this may very well be bumped up to 4 stars upon a re read


  9. Boudewijn Boudewijn says:

    The Earth from here is a grand oasis in the big vastness of space Jim Lovell, Apollo 8 astronautIf you asked me, before I started this book, to name a few Apollo missions, I of course would have mentioned Apollo 11 and perhaps after some deep thinking Apollo 13, the one from Houston, we have a problem.Apollo 8 definitely would not come to mind, which is why is was so pleasantly surprised by this book After all, it was the Apollo 8 mission which really laid the groundwork for Armstrong s f The Earth from here is a grand oasis in the big vastness of space Jim Lovell, Apollo 8 astronautIf you asked me, before I started this book, to name a few Apollo missions, I of course would have mentioned Apollo 11 and perhaps after some deep thinking Apollo 13, the one from Houston, we have a problem.Apollo 8 definitely would not come to mind, which is why is was so pleasantly surprised by this book After all, it was the Apollo 8 mission which really laid the groundwork for Armstrong s first steps on the moon by sending the first humans in flight beyond the earth and around the moon And return, lest we forget.The main focus is on commander Frank Borman who is followed from early youth until his application at NASA and his subsequent career as an astronaut The Apollo 8 crew was the first to launch atop the powerful Saturn V rocket, lifting off from NASA s Kennedy Space Center in Florida bringing them to the moon, and the far side of the moon which no human eyes had ever seen It was this mission that produced the famous earthrise picture.The book never becomes to technical, explaining most concept in such a way that even I could understand them Also, by sharing the stories of the wives left behind, it is here and there emotional I never knew that each astronaut s wife would get a squawk box on which they could listen in on the conversation, although NASA, thoughtfully, had built in a 2 second delay, so they could shut it down if their husbands would crash and die.I listened the audiobook, so the interview between the author and Frank Bormann was a plus.All in all, I liked the book Anyone that is interested in space travel, or science in general, should give this book certainly attention


  10. Daniel Chaikin Daniel Chaikin says:

    Apollo 8 was the first manned flight to orbit the moon, famous for the Earthrise photo above For me this was a random audio selection that I was afraid might be boring and predictable and that opened up that way, almost Honestly, the word thrilling in the title was enough to make me suspicious But it was freely available from my library on audio and worth a try Kluger won me over completely I was a bit interested and then really interested and then maybe even caught some of the excitement Apollo 8 was the first manned flight to orbit the moon, famous for the Earthrise photo above For me this was a random audio selection that I was afraid might be boring and predictable and that opened up that way, almost Honestly, the word thrilling in the title was enough to make me suspicious But it was freely available from my library on audio and worth a try Kluger won me over completely I was a bit interested and then really interested and then maybe even caught some of the excitement of the era as television audiences around the globe stopped to watch these three astronauts orbiting the moon I think the book just manages to have the structure to bring you to each moment, to make prolonged rather mundane activities by the crew in the long space voyage feel like fascinating critical parts of the story So, a fun rewarding book, recommended to anyone who stumbles across it and thinks they might be interested 29 Apollo 8 The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Klugerreader Brian Troxellpublished 2017format 11 12 overdrive audio 311 pages, 320 pages in hardcover acquired Library loanlistened May 10 23rating 4


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