Free ↠ L'albero delle bugie By Frances Hardinge – Thomashillier.co.uk



10 thoughts on “L'albero delle bugie

  1. says:

    Frances Hardinge is one of my most treasured literary finds of the past few years She is one of those writers that make me want to happily give the shout outs to their books from the rooftops and endlessly blab about them to anyone who would listen They have it all the spark, the snark, the depth, the skill and everything else that makes me smile happily when I go to reread them for the third time in a year Her books may be inexplicably classified under an umbrella of children s literature Frances Hardinge is one of my most treasured literary finds of the past few years She is one of those writers that make me want to happily give the shout outs to their books from the rooftops and endlessly blab about them to anyone who would listen They have it all the spark, the snark, the depth, the skill and everything else that makes me smile happily when I go to reread them for the third time in a year Her books may be inexplicably classified under an umbrella of children s literature , but they have managed to keep me enthralled and in all honesty are nosolely children s books than any of the classics with the sub adult characters think your Huck Finn, Holden Caulfield and Scout Finch, for instanceI want to be a bad example The Lie Tree is a fascinating book It is a quite dark and exceedingly clever mystery set on the murky edge between history and fantasy in the post Darwin s Origin of the Species 19th century straight laced Victorian England, touching upon the question of women s role in society, gender roles and expectations, the selective opportunities and blatant disregard and discrimination so absurd as to seem almost fantastical and yet so painfully historically real and true, and the conflict between the new ideas of evolution and the established societal faith based paradigms which left many feeling that the ground had been yanked from under their feetI have lived long enough to see the death of wonders Like many others, I have dedicated my life to investigating the marvels and mysteries of Creation, the better to understand the designs of our Maker Instead, our discoveries have brought us doubt and darkness Within our lifetime, we have seen Heaven s lamp smashed and our sacred place in the world snatched from us We have been dethroned and flung down among the beasts.We thought ourselves kings of the ages Now we find that all our civilization has been nothing but a brief, brightly lit nursery, where we have played with paper crowns and wooden sceptres Beyond the door are the dark wastes where Leviathans wrestled for millennia We are a blink of an eye, a joke amidst a tragedyAnd, of course, the nature, allure and perils of lying The danger and necessity of some lies The rewards and the consequences of them The easiness and the speed with which they find a life of their ownChoose a lie that others wish to believe, her father had written Myrtle had once explained to Faith that there was a right way to give an order to a servant You phrased it as a question to be polite Will you fetch the tea Could you please speak with Cook But instead of your voice pitch going up at the end, you let it droop downward, to show that it was not really a question, and they were not expected to say no.It occurred to Faith that that was the way her mother talked to herFaith Sunderly is fourteen,clumsily rocking between childhood and adulthood , occupying that uncertain place in a young girl s life when she is no longer a child but not yet a woman, constantly relegated between the perceived silliness of a child and presumed inferiority as a female A priest s daughter, Faith is an aspiring natural scientist in a world that traps her by the artificial limitation that Victorian society places on womenFaith was full of questions, coiling and writhing like the snake in the crate There was a hunger in her, and girls were not supposed to be hungry They were supposed to nibble sparingly when at table, and their minds were supposed to be satisfied with a slim diet too A few stale lessons from tired governesses, dull walks, unthinking pastimes But it was not enough All knowledge any knowledge called to Faith, and there was a delicious, poisonous pleasure in stealing it unseen She had always known that she was rated less than Howard, the treasured son Now, however, she knew that she was ranked somewhere below miscellaneous cuttingsFaith wants it all and nothing unreasonable the opportunities that are denied to her because of her gender, the recognition of her sharp and clever mind, her father s love and respect but runs into a brick wall of societal expectations and standards that require her to be a good girl , obedient, quiet and invisible As her own much adored father brutally tells her in a moment of angerListen, Faith A girl cannot be brave, or clever, or skilled as a boy can If she is not good, she is nothing Do you understandAnd Faith can t help but become angry Very angry Angry at the word that insists on putting obstacles in her path and reducing her to a mere pretty ornament Angry at other women who seem to be so adept at fulfilling their executed societal role oh Faith, if you only knew Angry at all the thwarted attempts to make a difference, make a mark on this world Angry at the unknown killers that took her father s life and threaten to destroy her family s normal existence.And when Faith Sunderly is angry, the fireworks flyPeople were animals, and animals were nothing but teeth You bit first, and you bit often That was the only way to survive She did not feel hot or helpless anyShe felt the way snakes looked when they movedHad Hardinge been a lesser writer, this could have been a lovely story about a young girl trying to ascertain her place in the hostile world Or a great mystery story Or a sharp commentary on the clash of societal values, the intersection of old and new, the faith and science, the progressive and the repressive traditionalist viewpoints It could have been any of those But Hardinge is amazing, and this book is all of the above, faultlessly and sharply created, full of nuances and greyness of adulthood replacing the comfortable black and white world of childhood and adolescence It is about not only growing into your own not always nice and good self but also about learning to see the things in yourself and others that go against what is comfortable to think and assumeIt could be kindness Faith felt hollow at the thought She had needed kindness before, and had received none Now it was too late, and she did not know what to do with it There was a creeping sensation under Faith s skin Just for a moment she wished that she could shed herself like a snake s skin, and slide away to be somebody new This was the hardest part It was easier to be the witch, the harpy Being human was dangerousIt is about understanding the ways you are shaped by your world despite trying so hard not to be And yet about understanding not only who you are really are but who you want and need to beWho had they been, all these mothers and sisters and wives What were they now Moons, blank and faceless, gleaming with borrowed light, each spinning loyally around a bigger sphere Invisible, said Faith under her breath Women and girls were so often unseen, forgotten, afterthoughts Faith herself had used it to good effect, hiding in plain sight and living a double life But she had been blinded by exactly the same invisibility of the mind, and was only just realizing it Faith had always told herself that she was not like other ladies But neither, it seemed, were other ladiesHardinge weaves such a fascinating story that I ve read it twice in a space of three weeks, and it hasn t lost its allure with familiarity The second read made it even better, and that s not such a frequent occurrence The wonderfully sharply developed characters, the atmospheric setting of the island of Vane that made me feel that I was there near the cliffs and caves and the sea, the natural dialogue and the utmost feeling of satisfaction at the perhaps best answer to the never ending questions of what will you be when you grow up I hope someday my future hypothetical daughter can quote the cheeky answer of Faith Sunderly when faced with a life choiceI want to be a bad example 5 stars.My reviews of other books by Frances Hardinge A Face Like GlassGullstruck IslandVerdigris Deep


  2. says:

    ONE THOUSAND STARSI ve made several false starts with this review because I don t know what to write How do I describe The Lie Tree As a Victorian murder mystery As a book about lies and truths and the things that are obvious and the things that are not As a tale about filial loyalty As a revenge story As a look at the ways that women have been made invisible throughout history As a feminist triumph These are all truths But they are partial truths because this book is not one thing or another ONE THOUSAND STARSI ve made several false starts with this review because I don t know what to write How do I describe The Lie Tree As a Victorian murder mystery As a book about lies and truths and the things that are obvious and the things that are not As a tale about filial loyalty As a revenge story As a look at the ways that women have been made invisible throughout history As a feminist triumph These are all truths But they are partial truths because this book is not one thing or another Just like all of Frances Hardinge s books before this, The Lie Tree is a complex narrative of subtle interwoven storylines that are surprising, dark, sad and incredibly beautiful In fact, I d say this is Hardinge s most beautiful book to date That sort of beauty that comes from things that are so real they feel make you like your heart has been pierced But in the nicest way possible As the story starts, Faith s family is moving to a small island, away from everything they know so that Faith s father can work at a new fossil excavation At first greeted with the fanfare an honourable guest deserves, things turn sour very soon when whispers of her father s possible fraudulent actions reach their retreat All of a sudden, no one wants to talk to the family And then, Faith s father turns up dead.Ruled an accident but under suspicion of suicide, Faith suspects his death is something else altogether murder And deep in her heart she knows she must avenge the death of her dearest one.And Faith knows exactly what do to, for hidden deep in a cave by the sea, there is a tree that if fed lies, gives out fruits of truth.What s most striking about The Lie Tree is that, at face value, this is perhaps Frances Hardinge s least fantastical book The most obvious fantasy elements of the plot don t come into play well into the second half of the novel and even by them, the story remains a murder mystery with a character driven arc.I wondered if I was looking at it wrong Because if we look at the realest aspects of story which describe events that really did happen, thoughts that people did believe, it is easy to be struck by how surreal they read Because in truth, the further removed we are in time, thehistory sounds fantastical to us In a way, everything about The Lie Tree could be seen as fantastical, especially with regards to gender But then again no Better not to reduce what was very real and very painful to flights of fancy I don t know how to put to words what this book made me feel for its female characters It was utterly perfection.The Lie Tree is the story of a young girl Faith who is at that moment in time where she is no longer a child but not yet a woman Faith lives a conflicting life, torn between what she is told about what it means to be a woman and the things that she is not supposed to do, feel and know and the feelings she has, the knowledge she knows and the thoughts she thinks Constantly at war within herself, Faith strives to be good but also to be accepted and loved What she has learned over the years is how to hide, to conceal In sum, how to become just as invisible as the world expects her to be But she is ever so angry about it And watching that anger unleashed was one of the best reading experiences of my life.At the centre of Faith s life is the dichotomous separation between her father and mother She is incredibly loyal to her genius father, a prestigious Natural Scientist just as she completely disdainful of her mother, Myrtle, a lady who uses her looks to get what she wants It s the Victorian era and this division of roles and the perceived inherent quality that separates them is at the core of The Lie Tree.Faith s long journey to understanding both her father and her mother is one of the main focus of the book And that journey is interspersed with encounters with a plethora of other ladies At first Faith s viewpoint is coloured by her own internalised acceptance of narratives surrounding women To wit in the beginning everything is her father and everything is male centric, intelligence and knowledge are relegated to menfolk Thethe story progresses, thethis changes All of a sudden the women are there, have been there all along and they are something else altogether Queer ladies, villainous ladies, adapting ladies, awesome ladies, accepting ladies, angry ladies Myrtle, I adore you.Invisible women Remember this is a story about lies Most of Frances Hardinge s books to date have one way or another dealt with revolution and politics in a wider scenario This is also true of The Lie Tree but I d also say this felt like her most personal book in the way that revolution, politics, evolution affect the social, the intimate, the individual Everything is politics.It is deeply touching Equally moving are the relationships in the story The way that Faith s father breaks her heart The way Faith breaks her mother s heart and how they mend their relationship in the end Faith and her brother Howard have incredibly touching moments.There is also the never named relationship between her and local boy Paul Surprising no one, Frances Hardinge also knows how to write budding romance Paul and Faith s friendship is punctuated with delightful rule breaking, by testing limits and boundaries and seeing how far they can go in the things they say to each other and how much of their real selves they can afford to show Patriarchy destroys boys lives too And every single scene together is one step further, building up to the most amazing, no holds barred talk in the last pages of this novel in which simple yet heart breaking desires and truths are uttered.I won t spoil that conversation Suffice it to say that never was a line answering the simple question what do you want to be when you grow upthrilling Well, here it is The elusive 10 rated Frances Hardinge book The Lie Tree is perfect


  3. says:

    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend


  4. says:

    Thanks goes to Netgalley for the ARC 1860, and all the true social horrors that the time can bring, can also be a time, in the right writer s hands, that can bring the greatest illumination upon all such subjects of a women s place in our day Frances Hardinge is truly such a brilliant writer.I can honestly say without spoiling a thing that this novel does wonderful justice for women and one s self worth I think we could all learn from setting such a bad example, and never mind all the missteps Thanks goes to Netgalley for the ARC 1860, and all the true social horrors that the time can bring, can also be a time, in the right writer s hands, that can bring the greatest illumination upon all such subjects of a women s place in our day Frances Hardinge is truly such a brilliant writer.I can honestly say without spoiling a thing that this novel does wonderful justice for women and one s self worth I think we could all learn from setting such a bad example, and never mind all the missteps and mistakes that Faith will have to take through the novel I certainly cringed and worried and delighted in all her mistakes and triumphs, even as I grewandworried about the eventual outcome.For this felt like a truly great horror from the very beginning and never once let the tension slide, rocking hard with detail, sharp characterizations, and wonderful reveals One might call it dark fantasy, of course, or historical fiction with a magical realism bent, or even a fairy tale so rooted in reality that one could never dig deep enough to kill the tree, but alas, it works best as a truly thrilling horror with a wonderful twist.Can I dance around and whoop with joy, now You betcha Spoiler I already did The one thing that I d really like to mention about the book is something I can t really do without giving out some true spoilers, and I m loath to do so BUT I was fascinated with the author s choice of subject material, and for any of you who later have read this great novel, think about this Don t you think the author, herself, might have thought that this little wonder of a tree might have been absolutely perfect for herself, being a writer of outright lies We all know the old adage about writing fiction because it is the surest path to the hidden truths, do we not Is this novel not only a perfect tale, but also a bit of a mirror to the fact of her own writing I think so And I can t think of a better compliment I could ever give


  5. says:

    I m going to leave this at a 3 for now I liked it, but there were some things so it might just be my mood I hope I m not coming up on a book slump I mean real life is causing me some probs so I will reread it again later Happy Reading Mel


  6. says:

    Let me be frank Shawn As long as I can be Dean and Gus can be Sammy.Gus Why do I always have to be Sammy Shawn Fine, he s Sammy That makes you Joey Bishop Is that what you really want You want to be Joey Bishop Let s start over.Let me be honest The Lie Tree is a perfect example of why I stopped auto buying authors I loved Fly by Night my review , sought out the hardcover and added it to my library The Lie Tree shares many of the same roots but grows them in a very different way, emer Let me be frank Shawn As long as I can be Dean and Gus can be Sammy.Gus Why do I always have to be Sammy Shawn Fine, he s Sammy That makes you Joey Bishop Is that what you really want You want to be Joey Bishop Let s start over.Let me be honest The Lie Tree is a perfect example of why I stopped auto buying authors I loved Fly by Night my review , sought out the hardcover and added it to my library The Lie Tree shares many of the same roots but grows them in a very different way, emerging a prickling specimen, all nettle leaves and nothing I want to bring home.Faith Sunderly and her family have suddenly left England for Vane Island on the pretext of a fossil dig in some unusual caves Along with Faith is her father, the Reverend Erasmus, her mother Myrtle, her younger brother Howard, and Uncle Miles Although the reasoning seems solid as the Reverend has quite the international reputation for fossils, Faith has been sensing something disastrous lurking at the edges When they arrive at the island, they and the Reverend s specimen collection are installed in a small house In their short time, the Reverend and Myrtle manage to alienate many of the island residents, and when the truth of their exile emerges, things go from bad to worse Faith finds herself trying to understand the adult situation and discover who is behind their troubles.Plotting is extremely slow it wasn t until chapter 15 that events really started to cascade While a slow build was present in Fly by Night, the beginning had a daffy, playful and imaginary setting that kept me intrigued The island fails to stand out for me mostly wild, dismal moor long, ill kept roads, random caves and wild cliffs The Reverend acting irrationally Myrtle seeking normalcy Howard wanting reassurance Once I reached the particular event s , it became easier to stay interested Alas it never obtained the heights of must finish, except in the obligatory sense, as in I must finish reading that ARC for NetGalley Writing is solid Hardinge is an excellent writer, and this is a solid example of her work, but at the risk of sounding redundant, I preferred her flights of fancy in Fly by Night. Much of the strength is saved for descriptions of the science and for musing on Faith s budding feminism There was a hunger in her, and girls were not supposed to be hungry They were supposed to nibble sparingly when at the table, and their minds were supposed to be satisfied with a slim diet too Still, I felt a few of her metaphors were forced, awkwardly reflected from Faith s thoughts The long journey had left them all depleted, like paintbrushes drawn across a broad stretch of canvas The characterization is well done for Faith, but not particularly likable Faith has the astonishing self centeredness of many twelve year olds, and while she is exquisitely attuned to her father and Howard s moods, she echoes the prejudices of her upbringing and is largely oblivious to the lives of the servants and women, although she is coming to understand how her mother manipulates the world around her Now she was humbled, desperate to be permitted any part in interesting conversations Even so, each time she pretended ignorance, she hated herself and her own desperation She s working hard to understand her family, understand the dynamics of her father s world, so it s easy to root for her until one realizes how misaligned both cause and methods are Many of the other characters are single note, I suspect partly because of Faith s point of view However, she does show a depth of understanding of Howard, which is sweet, and eventually comes to understand an island boy Insight on the lives of older Victorian women is forced upon her by a couple of conversations in the wrap up.The fantastical angle to the story come from a plant her father was hiding from everyone, although Faith managed to find out the secret The tree grows in absolute darkness, seemingly fed on lies Hardinge loses a bit of her tale here, building too many metaphors is this a tree from the Garden of Eden that confirms Biblical history Is it an observable, measurable quantity that confirms Darwinism Do lies give truth, or breedlies Does it matter if you can make money off it Considering what Faith learns later, isn t everyone kind of lying most of the time, so why aren t these trees everywhere The ending sort of satisfied, until I thoughtabout the implications I m not sure Faith learned the right lessons at the end perhaps what Hardinge wrote was the YA Victorian equivalent of Joe Abercrombie s Best Served Cold. Which may, after all, be Hardinge s point, but frankly, I m going to resist learning her lesson.Just call me Frank.Many thanks to NetGalley and Abrams for the ARC.Two and a half prickly stars


  7. says:

    I don t read children s books very often, but the fact that this one won the overall Costa prize, backed up by a couple of positive friend reviews here, persuaded to make an exception The basic premise of a plant that thrives on human lies takes some swallowing, but if you accept that, it is a terrific feminist subversion of the classic adventure story genre, and a very enjoyable read.


  8. says:

    Tell me lies , tell me sweet little liesOh, No Not silly, mean, small, insignificant lies Let them be huge, outrageous, extraordinary, gigantic Feed me a juicy, spicy lie, one of those everyone can t stop chatting about One of those everybody claims to believe, and I ll reward you with the most valuable, precious secrete I trade lies for strong, powerful trues Cos I m the Lie Tree, and that s my exclusive magnanimous endowment Besides entertainning, this fantasy is also about the powe Tell me lies , tell me sweet little liesOh, No Not silly, mean, small, insignificant lies Let them be huge, outrageous, extraordinary, gigantic Feed me a juicy, spicy lie, one of those everyone can t stop chatting about One of those everybody claims to believe, and I ll reward you with the most valuable, precious secrete I trade lies for strong, powerful trues Cos I m the Lie Tree, and that s my exclusive magnanimous endowment Besides entertainning, this fantasy is also about the power of lies Choose a lie that others wish to believe They will cling to it, even if it is proven false before their face If anyone tries to show them the Truth, they will turn on them and fight them tooth and nail There were kind lies You still look beautiful I love you I forgive you.There were frightened lies Someone else must have taken it Of course I am Anglican I never saw that baby before.There were predatory lies Buy this tonic if you want your child to recover I will look after you Your secret is safe with me.Half lies, and the tense little silences where a truth should have been Lies like knives, lies like poultices The tiger s stripe, and the fawn s dusky dapple And everywhere, everywhere, the lies that people told themselves Dreams like cut flowers, with no nourishing root Will o the wisp lights to make them feel less alone in the dark Hollow resolutions and empty excuses Curiously, when we think about a good lie, we can easily picture a tree it has a strong root and grows all over several branches


  9. says:

    I felt super in the middle about this one On one hand, I appreciated Faith s budding feminism, her fierce determination and her defiance of authority On the other, I struggled to care much about the characters and the plot felt slow and uninteresting While I liked reading about the complex and sometimes contradictory motives of women living in a patriarchal society, I struggled to see why Faith defended her father when he acted like such a misogynist Despite my lukewarm reaction to the book, I felt super in the middle about this one On one hand, I appreciated Faith s budding feminism, her fierce determination and her defiance of authority On the other, I struggled to care much about the characters and the plot felt slow and uninteresting While I liked reading about the complex and sometimes contradictory motives of women living in a patriarchal society, I struggled to see why Faith defended her father when he acted like such a misogynist Despite my lukewarm reaction to the book, I would tentatively recommend it to fans of young adult paranormal books who find its synopsis interesting Yay for books with female characters who kick butt even when encouraged not to


  10. says:

    3.5 stars


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L'albero delle bugie Fin Da Quando Era Piccola Faith Ha Imparato A Nascondere Dietro Le Buone Maniere La Sua Intelligenza Acuta E Ardente Nell Inghilterra Vittoriana Questo Ci Che Devono Fare Le Brave Signorine Figlia Del Reverendo Sunderly, Esperto Studioso Di Fossili, Faith Deve Fingere Di Non Essere Attratta Dai Misteri Della Scienza, Di Non Avere Fame Di Conoscenza, Di Non Sognare La Libert Tutto Cambia Dopo La Morte Del Padre Frugando Tra Oggetti E Documenti Misteriosi, Faith Scopre L Esistenza Di Un Albero Incredibile, Che Si Nutre Di Bugie Per Dar Vita A Frutti Magici Capaci Di Rivelare Segreti Proprio Grazie Al Potere Oscuro Di Questo Albero Che Faith Fa Esplodere Il Coraggio E La Rabbia Covati Per Anni, Alla Ricerca Della Verit E Del Suo Posto Nel Mondo Magia, Scienza E Desiderio Di Libert Si Incontrano In Un Questo Romanzo, Con Una Coraggiosa Eroina Che Rompe Gli Schemi, Nel Solco Di Jane Eyre