Who Do You Think You Are? PDF ´ Do You Think ePUB


10 thoughts on “Who Do You Think You Are?

  1. Dolors Dolors says:

    What is it that makes us choose a partner, the person with whom we believe we want to spend our life with And how do personal circumstances, the expectations of others, and the visions we project of the future we think we desire affect such decision making process If you are a woman and you read this book, you will recognize yourself, or a previous version of yourself, in the young girl who defines the rest of her life based on her uncontrollable need to please.If you are a man and you read thi What is it that makes us choose a partner, the person with whom we believe we want to spend our life with And how do personal circumstances, the expectations of others, and the visions we project of the future we think we desire affect such decision making process If you are a woman and you read this book, you will recognize yourself, or a previous version of yourself, in the young girl who defines the rest of her life based on her uncontrollable need to please.If you are a man and you read this book, you will sympathize with the chivalrous young boy whose ideals are betrayed by the mundane quality of reality.They love each other as much as they abhor each other, and after half of a life spent waiting for their better versions to appear and mend what can t be mended, truth sinks in and shatters any romanticized idea you might have about marriage Munro s prose is as sharp as a knife, but her words caress your scarred wounds in ways you would never have anticipated Do read her and wake up from your slumber if you dare


  2. Lisa Lisa says:

    Alice Munro tells me some vital facts about myself, and what fuels my reading passion.Why I can t review her at all I read her stories this is my fourth collection , find pleasure in the calm and quiet settings and characters, full of subtext and possibilities for own interpretations I bow to her incredible skill to create atmosphere And yet I close the collections, one after the other, with a feeling of Yes, that is it With a feeling of the Nothingness that is slowly eating the imagin Alice Munro tells me some vital facts about myself, and what fuels my reading passion.Why I can t review her at all I read her stories this is my fourth collection , find pleasure in the calm and quiet settings and characters, full of subtext and possibilities for own interpretations I bow to her incredible skill to create atmosphere And yet I close the collections, one after the other, with a feeling of Yes, that is it With a feeling of the Nothingness that is slowly eating the imaginary world in The Neverending Story Alice Munro s world is not mine, and I can t make it mine, however much I try Admiration for her writing never changes into passionate approval or disapproval, never makes me laugh or cry or yell or joke in my head Her prose doesn t TALK to me, and I have nothing, absolutely nothing to add to the perfection with which she forms her carefully crafted characters.I give the collection all the literary stars it deserves, while feeling a strange sadness that it isn t meant for me What I learn, reading Munro, is that I want to be intellectually, politically, aesthetically challenged in my reading, I want to kick and scream and fight, or laugh tears I want wild thoughts and crazy characters, and language that bends and stretches the conventions rather than adding words like pearls on a string to make a pretty, yet boring pattern.So, Alice Munro Every once in a while, I pick up some of your stories, bow to your talent, and skip the review, as I have nothing to say


  3. Hugh Hugh says:

    I had never read Alice Munro before, so I am grateful to The Mookse and the Gripes group s project revisiting the 1980 Booker shortlist This book is difficult to categorise, and is somewhere between a short story collection and a novel I can see why the Booker jury chose to accept it as a novel, because the stories are all episodes in the life of one woman, Rose, and they are arranged in a chronological sequence, but each could equally be read as a self contained story Rose s mother died when I had never read Alice Munro before, so I am grateful to The Mookse and the Gripes group s project revisiting the 1980 Booker shortlist This book is difficult to categorise, and is somewhere between a short story collection and a novel I can see why the Booker jury chose to accept it as a novel, because the stories are all episodes in the life of one woman, Rose, and they are arranged in a chronological sequence, but each could equally be read as a self contained story Rose s mother died when she was young, and the dominant figure in the early stories set during her childhood is her stepmother Flo, who runs a shop in a poor district of a small Canadian town Her education allows her to escape, but the last couple of stories see her sucked back as she deals with Flo in old age.These are quiet stories with fairly humdrum subject matter, but Munro is a master of telling detail, and the whole adds up to something universal, effective and moving


  4. Laysee Laysee says:

    The Beggar Maid is an engaging set of linked stories about Rose and her stepmother, Flo, over a period of forty years Initially published in Canada under the title, Who Do You Think You Are, it is the 1978 winner of the Canadian Governor General s Award Although this collection of stories bears two different titles, it captures in essence the main protagonist, Rose s identity crisis chiefly with respect to her social status and sense of self worth When we first meet Rose, she lives with her w The Beggar Maid is an engaging set of linked stories about Rose and her stepmother, Flo, over a period of forty years Initially published in Canada under the title, Who Do You Think You Are, it is the 1978 winner of the Canadian Governor General s Award Although this collection of stories bears two different titles, it captures in essence the main protagonist, Rose s identity crisis chiefly with respect to her social status and sense of self worth When we first meet Rose, she lives with her working class family in a poor part of town in West Hanratty, Ontario She has a difficult relationship with a resentful stepmother who treats her curiously withextraordinary softness and hardnessIn the chapter Royal Beating , we see a heartbreaking example of Flo s maltreatment of young Rose Yet, poverty and harsh upbringing give Rose bragging rights as she grows up to regale others with stories earned the painful way.A scholarship takes Rose to college where she meets wealthy Patrick Blatchford, the snob who deems Rose a beggar maid worthy of elevating to his social stature A visit to Patrick s family in Vancouver raises Rose s awareness that wealth is unlikely to make her happyThere was a terrible amount of luxury and uneaseRose acknowledged thatshe had never known before how some places could choke you off, choke off your very lifeNonetheless, Rose cannot help wanting to belong with the rich set of town folks In the chapter, Half a Grapefruit , Rose is laughed at for her pretensions Rose does not love Patrick and wonders if she can afford to break off their engagement.The strongest writing comes from Munro exploring the motivation behind Rose s decision Munro dissects the multifarious reasons Rose offers for her decision and the lack of honesty that goes into her own rationalization for the choice she finally makes It is amazing how well Munro knows people their blind side, inconsistencies, self deception, and preservation instincts She communicates how hard it is for people to know themselves and why they make the decisions they do For Rose, it appears to be a tangled mess of fear of lost opportunities, greed, pity, cowardice, vanity, or a vision of happiness It is clear from Rose s experience that the complexity of our desires can make us strangers to ourselves.Rose is a flawed character and she makes many unwise decisions However, Munro exposes Rose s foibles with such humane understanding that we do not feel we can judge her In relation to Flo, Rose manages over the years to maintain a sufficiently decent relationship Toward the end, in a moment of insight when Flo reproaches Rose for a reprehensible job she has undertaken, Rose recognizes that Flo s reproaches made sense and werepainfully, truly meant they were all a hard life had to offerRead The Beggar Maid It attests to Munro s profound understanding of human nature rendered in honest, perceptive, and clear sighted prose


  5. ·Karen· ·Karen· says:

    What is there to say about Alice Munro She is the consummate artist, the supreme master of the short story form Incomparable in her complexity the sudden rush of surprising juxtapositions, the dip of a yawning vision of the abyss, the gurgle of delightful humour, the vibrant pleasure of recognition, that moment when you say yes, yes, of course.This collection, subtitled Stories of Flo and Rose, was first published in 1977 The stories areor less chronologically arranged and follow Rose What is there to say about Alice Munro She is the consummate artist, the supreme master of the short story form Incomparable in her complexity the sudden rush of surprising juxtapositions, the dip of a yawning vision of the abyss, the gurgle of delightful humour, the vibrant pleasure of recognition, that moment when you say yes, yes, of course.This collection, subtitled Stories of Flo and Rose, was first published in 1977 The stories areor less chronologically arranged and follow Rose from childhood through an ugly marriage to a somewhat fragile independence Flo is her stepmother in the final two stories Rose returns to the small town where she grew up in order to deal with Flo s growing strangeness and self neglect Taken together they almost form a novel there is development, change that comes with ageing, if not a plot Nevertheless each story stands alone, honed to perfection, honey smooth and supple in the telling What comes through most strongly how women s horizons were kept small Shame, that constant query who do you think you are that kept any form of ambition or pride well in check Freedom, independence, autonomy coming at a huge emotional cost, and the awareness of that cost Magnificent


  6. Eric Eric says:

    In a review of the Selected Stories that functioned as herald, Updike spoke of a well mediated complexity and multiplicity of plot, an intense clarity of phrase and image, an exceptional psychological searchingness and honesty, a grittiness and a bold reach promises of pleasure I retained, and recalled over time, until circumstances fatigue with the fiction I was reading, ambitious browsing in a store that carried a quantity of Munro placed The Beggar Maid in hand And it s wonderful Thes In a review of the Selected Stories that functioned as herald, Updike spoke of a well mediated complexity and multiplicity of plot, an intense clarity of phrase and image, an exceptional psychological searchingness and honesty, a grittiness and a bold reach promises of pleasure I retained, and recalled over time, until circumstances fatigue with the fiction I was reading, ambitious browsing in a store that carried a quantity of Munro placed The Beggar Maid in hand And it s wonderful These stories show a Woolf like stylistic ambition the point and swiftness of good prose, with a fineness of verbal texture, poetic sentences to savor I love writers who try to prove Val ry wrong you can walk and dance at the same time To the Lighthouse just ascended a few rungs of the to read Flo and Rose are stepmother and stepdaughter In chronological order though the stories do not really obey that order, they glimpse backwards and forwards, poignantly , the settings are the Depression poor rural Ontario town, West Hanratty, where Rose is a schoolgirl and Flo a storekeeper university a Vancouver suburb a town in the Kootenay Mountains professorial parties in Kingston then back to Hanratty, and the melancholy stations of senescence Flo s , the Legion hall, the County Home I preferred the six of ten stories set in Hanratty Munro has a genius for the constitution of the small town the jealousies, the watchfulness, the fine parsing of status also, for even the most humdrum community s violent sur reality of rumor, legend, and whispered over past infamies The middle stories of Rose s aimless, peripatetic, vaguely metropolitan career as a determinedly free spirit did less for me I found her most interesting as a young woman first feeling her difference Flo was his idea of what a woman ought to be, Rose knew that, and indeed he often said it A woman ought to be energetic, practical, clever at making and saving she ought to be shrewd, good at bargaining and bossing and seeing through other people s pretentions At the same time she should be na ve intellectually, childlike, contemptuous of maps and long words and anything in books, full of charming jumbled notions, superstitions, traditional beliefs So part of Rose s disgrace was that she was female but mistakenly so, would not turn out to be the right kind of woman But there wasto it The real problem was that she combined and carried on what he must have thought of as the worst qualities in himself All the things he had beaten down, successfully submerged, in himself, had surfaced again in her, and she was showing no will to combat them She mooned and daydreamed, she was vain and eager to show off her whole life was in her head She had not inherited the thing he took pride in, and counted on his skill with his hands, his thoroughness and conscientiousness at any work in fact she was unusually clumsy, slapdash, ready to cut corners The sight of her slopping around with her hands in the dishpan, her thoughts a thousand miles away, her rump already bigger than Flo s, her hair wild and bushy the sight of the large and indolent and self absorbed fact of her, seemed to fill him with irritation, with melancholy, almost with disgust.The themes of Rose s adulthood manners complicated by mobility, the composite self creation of the disowned and prayed for draw from Munro a treatment gentler and less emphatic than I think I like But who knows, further reading of Munro, or rereading of The Beggar Maid, may disclose something subtler andinteresting, in this line, than grim Yates futile puppet strivers, or Edmund White s self inflicted autobiographical ironies In the Rose only stories I may have just missed Flo Not because I think Flo what a woman ought to be, but because she s just a great character I like Munro s presentation of her grim hilarity, her store of lurid local anecdotes, her worldview peopled from the nickelodeon villainies and tabloid panics of the 1910s and 20s Flo said to watch for White Slavers She said this was how they operated an old woman, a motherly or grandmotherly sort, made friends while riding beside you on a bus or train She offered you candy, which was drugged Pretty soon you began to droop and mumble, were in no condition to speak for yourself Oh, help, the woman said, my daughter granddaughter is sick, please somebody help me get her off so that she can recover in the fresh air Up stepped a polite gentleman, pretending to be a stranger, offering assistance Together, at the next stop, they hustled you off the train or bus, and that was the last the ordinary world saw of you They kept you prisoner in the White Slave place to which you had been transported drugged and bound so you wouldn t even know where you were , until such time as you were thoroughly degraded and in despair, your insides torn up by drunken men and invested with vile disease, your mind destroyed by drugs, your hair and teeth fallen out It took about three years, for you to get in this state You wouldn t want to go home, then, maybe couldn t remember home, or find your way home if you did So they let you out on the streets


  7. Bonnie Bonnie says:

    In these ten inter connected stories of Rose and Flo, Alice Munro explores the universal story of growing up the question of identity, of resilience, and of escape with a difference, of course, because this is Alice Munro, the Canadian author of too many awards to mention In June, 2009 she won the Man Booker International Prize After reading daughter Sheila Munro s memoir I decided to reread Who Do You Think You Aretitled The Beggar Maid Storie In these ten inter connected stories of Rose and Flo, Alice Munro explores the universal story of growing up the question of identity, of resilience, and of escape with a difference, of course, because this is Alice Munro, the Canadian author of too many awards to mention In June, 2009 she won the Man Booker International Prize After reading daughter Sheila Munro s memoir I decided to reread Who Do You Think You Aretitled The Beggar Maid Stories of Flo and Rose in English and American editions Sheila says When I try to imagine my parents courtship, scenes from the story The Beggar Maid roll through my mind like reels from a movie I have seen, a movie in which my mother stars as Rose, the poor scholarship student, with my father as Patrick, the wealthy department store heir When Patrick visits Rose s family I see my father sitting at the kitchen table at my mother s house at the end of Lowertown Road in Wingham and seeing the plastic swan with the paper napkins in it and my mother being ashamed onlevels than she can count I know I am on dangerous ground here I tell myself I am wrong to see fiction in this way, that fiction, even autobiographical fiction, is not the same as autobiography, but I can t change it, I can t unravel the truth of my mother s fiction from the reality of what actually happened So unassailable is the truth of her fiction that sometimes I even feel as though I m living inside an Alice Munro story It s as if her view of the world must be the way the world really is, because it feels so convincing, so true, that you trust her every word pp.10 11 I could indeed see Sheila in Anna, Rose and Patrick s daughter In Providence , when Rose has decided to leave Patrick just as Alice left Sheila s father, Jim Munro and Rose asks Anna if she wants to stay with her Dad or go with her, Anna calls out for her father to join them When he came she sat up and pulled them both down on the bed, one on each side of her She held on to them, and began to sob and shake A violently dramatic child, sometimes, a bare blade. Anna tells them they don t need to separate because they no longer fight The next morning, Anna is cheerful, says she wants to stay with her school, her friends, and then halfway down the walk she turns to wave and shriek at her parents Have a happy divorceThe first story, Royal Beatings , begins late in the Depression years in the fictional Ontario town, Hanratty Rose, her father, and step mother Flo live in the poor western section, behind their grocery and furniture repair store Rose says things that make Flo question who does she think she is , and then when Rose s father comes home Flo incites his wrath on her behalf until he begins to remove his belt and Flo backpedalsOh, you don t have to use the belt on her Do you have to use the beltRose tries to look at the kitchen floor, that clever and comfortable geometrical arrangement instead of at him, at the belt How can this go on in front of such daily witnesses the linoleum, the calendar with the mill and creek and autumn leaves, the old accommodating pots and pansHe tells her to hold out her hand and she realizes these things aren t going to rescue her They turn bland and useless, even unfriendly Pots can show malice, the patterns of linoleum can leer up at you, treachery is the other side of dailiness. Afterwards, Flo pampers Rose Nothing is simple in a Munro story Alice Munro s talent is her ability to take a fact, an observation, an anecdote, or even a single detail from real life, and then build on it, transform it into fiction that becomes evenreal than real life And this book is labeled a collection of stories, but they are so inter connected that it s as if Munro invented a new novel form the settings, characters, families all are cross referenced to other stories in the collection to connect past, present, and future events And yet each story can stand on its own, each a slice of Rose s life Privilege and Half a Grapefruit are about Rose s life at school Mischief , my favourite story, although I liked every single one they re really part of a whole, after all is about Rose s relationship with her best friend s husband Spelling is about putting Flo into a Home The final, title story, in part, addresses the question raised in the first story In her third or fourth year at high school, the teacher tells the class to copy a long poem from the board, then learn it by heart, and recite it the following day Rose skipped the first step because she only needed to read it over a couple of times in her head before she had it memorized The teacher makes her recite it in front of the class and Rose does so The teacher says she may know the poem, but that it wasn t an excuse for not doing what she was told to do Rose has to stay after school to write it out three times When she finishes, the teacher saysYou can t go thinking you are better than other people just because you can learn poems Who do you think you are In Sheila Munro s memoir we learn that Alice Munro has a near photographic memory How else can her almost freakish memory, her ability, for instance, to look at her old high school photos and remember the colours of all the dresses the girls are wearing, be explained Alice Munro puts her memory to good use she is such a prolific, inspired writer I don t think she ll ever run out of ideas Good thing, too I m obviously not the only reader in the world who can t get enough of her stories And looking back at this book after reading about Alice Munro the person, I have learned a bitabout just how Alice Munro goes about writing


  8. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Rating 2.5 of fiveI hate Flo, and dislike Rose, and can think of no possible reason for anyone to readthan the Pearl Rule requires or the first three stories, whichever comes first in your edition.The entire unkind review is on my blog, Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud Rating 2.5 of fiveI hate Flo, and dislike Rose, and can think of no possible reason for anyone to readthan the Pearl Rule requires or the first three stories, whichever comes first in your edition.The entire unkind review is on my blog, Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud


  9. Lyn Elliott Lyn Elliott says:

    Finally I have entered the world of Munro readers and am delighted to find myself there It s interesting to learn that the transitions of Munro s own life are reflected in Rose s story and the emotional complexities circling round that central issue of who do you think you are , with deep uncertainty about self In every story, we see this manifested in some way Rose s indecision about marriage, the aftermath of that decision, misjudged relationships, wild exhilaration, lasting embarrassment Finally I have entered the world of Munro readers and am delighted to find myself there It s interesting to learn that the transitions of Munro s own life are reflected in Rose s story and the emotional complexities circling round that central issue of who do you think you are , with deep uncertainty about self In every story, we see this manifested in some way Rose s indecision about marriage, the aftermath of that decision, misjudged relationships, wild exhilaration, lasting embarrassments.It s often very funny, but embarrassment underlies much of the surface humour.Flo s admonitions to Rose about being wary of white slavers, particularly those dressed as clergymen are followed by a long train journey in which a self professed clergyman sits next to Rose and then is he, isn t he touching her leg How can she deal with this Indecision and anguish, locked into immobility because she doesn t know how to call him out.Years later, Flo turns up unannounced to a ceremony where Rose is to receive an award, dressed outlandishly, crowned with a mad wig and behaving outrageously The wig appears again after Flo s dementia has taken hold, and again the scenes are funny but excruciating.The structure works very well Each piece works as a contained story, with the sort of twist at the ending that I associate with Katherine Mansfield It s not a continuous narrative, but we see enough shaping moments of Rose s life to have as clear an idea as we can of who she is, even if she is not so sure herself Flo appearsas a foil, a force to be contended with, almost a caricature She is the source, but also the butt, of most of the humour, and a significant contributor to the embarrassments in Rose s life.I m glad I started with an early work.I borrowed this one from a university library and have bought Dear Life which will be the next of hers I read, but I ll need a bit of time in between


  10. Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly says:

    Sometimes I watch singing contests like the American Idol on tv and see good singers lose because they would commit the unfortunate mistake of choosing the wrong songs to sing I cannot say here that Alice Munro chose the wrong plot, or that the story does not suit her I do not know what would have suited her I can see, however, that she s a very good writer although the story here short STORIES, really, but made into one cohesive novel because of the commonality of characters in each of th Sometimes I watch singing contests like the American Idol on tv and see good singers lose because they would commit the unfortunate mistake of choosing the wrong songs to sing I cannot say here that Alice Munro chose the wrong plot, or that the story does not suit her I do not know what would have suited her I can see, however, that she s a very good writer although the story here short STORIES, really, but made into one cohesive novel because of the commonality of characters in each of the stories Rose, her stepmother Flo, her husband, father and lovers set mostly in poor, rural Canada, with lush details but concentrated mostly with the characters emotions and nuances of feelings, left me with regret that Alice Munro did not do something , well, meatier The Beggar Maid is the title of the 5th story while the last one the 10th is entitled Who Do You Think You Are This book was originally published with the latter as its title The best, however, I think is its 4th story, Wild Swans Here Rose, on a train, pretending to be asleep, allows herself to be fingerfucked by a middle age man, who had introduced himself earlier as a church minister, and who likewise pretends to be asleep while pleasuring Rose Without abandoning the decency, lyricism and poetry in her prose, Alice Munro succeeds in being intensely erotic Like she drives you into wild sex while she makes you listen to monks piously doing their Gregorian chants Marvelous writing


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Who Do You Think You Are? ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☂ Who Do You Think You Are? ✎ Author Alice Munro – Thomashillier.co.uk A new book by Alice Munro is always a major event, providing striking proof that a book can be both extremely popular and of the very highest literary quality It is significant that this superb collec You Think Kindle ´ A new book by Alice Munro is always a major event, providing striking proof that a book can be both extremely popular and of the very highest literary quality It is significant that this superb collection of linked stories has been four years in the making, a reflection of the author s determination to select only polished work that is truly excellent.

    Free Unlimited eBook reflection of the author s determination to select only polished work that is truly excellent."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 206 pages
  • Who Do You Think You Are?
  • Alice Munro
  • English
  • 07 October 2017
  • 0770517129

About the Author: Alice Munro

You Think Kindle ´ Alice Ann Munro, n e Laidlaw, is a Canadian short story writer who is widely considered one of the world s premier fiction writers Munro is a three time winner of Canada s Governor General s Award for fiction Her stories focus on human relationships looked at through the lens of daily life She has thus been referred to as the Canadian Chekhov She is the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Arabic Persian Russian Cyrillic Ukrainian Cyrillic Bulgarian Cyrillic Slovak Alice Munroov Serbian Alis Manro.