The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Reappraisal PDF ↠ The Dead

The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Reappraisal ❰EPUB❯ ✴ The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Reappraisal Author John Marco Allegro – Thomashillier.co.uk st edition Reprint with revisions nd edition st editionReprint Sea Scrolls: PDF Ë with revisionsnd edition.


10 thoughts on “The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Reappraisal

  1. Kristopher Swinson Kristopher Swinson says:

    This makes a very good popular account, with one subtle flaw While speaking of a deplorable lack of objectivity in approaching the Dead Sea Scrolls 12, 173 174 , Allegro himself seems to have already reappraised Christianity in the light of his own understanding as with the tired old line that Paul s accretions created Christianity, on 170 171, or the simply false notion, on 162, that evidence is self contradictory about whether Jesus intended the gospel message for the non Jewish world , s This makes a very good popular account, with one subtle flaw While speaking of a deplorable lack of objectivity in approaching the Dead Sea Scrolls 12, 173 174 , Allegro himself seems to have already reappraised Christianity in the light of his own understanding as with the tired old line that Paul s accretions created Christianity, on 170 171, or the simply false notion, on 162, that evidence is self contradictory about whether Jesus intended the gospel message for the non Jewish world , something he does not spring on the reader until he has lulled them to sleep with his amiable manner His eventual remark on what he regards as New Testament myths 178 was a long time in coming Note his usage of quotation marks, much as one would use one s fingers in derision, twice on 148 He is very cynical, in the typical higher critic fashion, in insisting that Biblical writers reworked their story to fit ancient prophecy for messianic expectation 104, 152 153, 175 he seems to have no idea what facts may be accepted about Jesus 109 , though he is loathe to discard them altogether He rests his case petulantly on the impossibility of arriving at an objective account about Jesus, even alleging that Jesus can never be understood in context 174 176.Brigham Young commented on the paradox that no intelligent person could give a disinterested account of such an important matter Heber J Grant similarly stated in many forms that if there s anything to the gospel, there s everything to it Or, as Paul Little put it Another erroneous ideais that the miracle stories must be discarded because they are told by believing disciples and are therefore not objective But the disciples were the ones on the scene who saw the miracles The fact that they were disciples is neither here nor there The question is, Did they tell the truth As we have seen, eyewitness testimony is the best we can get, and most of the disciples faced the test of death as the test of their veracity We would not today, in a court of law, say that in order to guarantee objectivity on the part of witnesses, we will listen only to those who were not at the scene of an accident and had nothing to do with it Nor would we say we would not take testimony from eyewitnesses, including the victims, because they would be prejudiced The crucial question in each case is truthfulness, not proximity or relationship to the events Know Why You Believe Wheaton, Illinois Scripture Press Publications, Inc., 1968 , 124 125 I won t trouble you with C.S Lewis magnificent coverage of the matter Allegro gives a fine admission that the standard text of our Bible is certainly very old and very reliable, though notwithout some scribal errors and adjustment 80 It s interesting that he early on notes there is no cause for dramatic changes to translation 83 If duly watchful, we can share the sheer enthusiasm in the world of textual criticism with extending certain source manuscripts, or useful reference points, backthan a thousand years 61 62, 64 65 This offers astonishing vindication of the Samaritan Pentateuch 77 and Justin s statements on adherence to the Septuagint 190 it sheds intriguing light on the Masoretic received text and The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs.Naturally, his bias if not conventional Christianity s skewed focus alone makes the theological comparison section a tad painful in its overreaching 171, 173 His alleged connections are not always that astounding or accurate 148, 160 , but it s not like he s spiritually astute, anyway Yet his historical account is absorbing and romantic His slick praise of the Jordanian government is unsurprising, considering their patronage, but I am surprised by his accommodating attitude toward the Ta amireh Bedouin manipulation of the scroll discoveries 45 and Kando s outlandish black market dealings Then he turns surprisingly impolitic on another group on 188 However, as for the parts of interest, one is easily caught up in the dismay as ancient documents are reduced to heaps of glue, the admiration of the high quality ink on the parchment, and the creative frenzy of a team of scholars tackling bona fide encoded writings 57 58 As always, I like seeing patterns that never change through the currents of history, like the calendar controversy between the Essenes and others 128 130 , reminiscent of that between the Celtic and Roman churches, and the Maccabbean Jews and Essenes 130, 154 being attacked on a holy day, reminiscent of the Yom Kippur War of 1973.All told, a worthwhile read for the cautious student I wouldn t recommend it as an introduction to the subject


  2. Roberta Roberta says:

    An exciting account of the discovery, collection, translation and interpretation of the Dead Sea Scrolls, written by one of the men who was there and translating The collection was in no way made easier by the fact that most of the scrolls were in minuscule pieces and some of the Bedouins might have been ripping them further to make larger sums of money from them The difficulty of the job is never played up by the author, who focuses on describing the importance of the discovery and where it f An exciting account of the discovery, collection, translation and interpretation of the Dead Sea Scrolls, written by one of the men who was there and translating The collection was in no way made easier by the fact that most of the scrolls were in minuscule pieces and some of the Bedouins might have been ripping them further to make larger sums of money from them The difficulty of the job is never played up by the author, who focuses on describing the importance of the discovery and where it fits in with current academic knowledge, rather than on the immense difficulty of collecting, sorting and translating the oldest scrolls that had ever been seen by the specialists, and understanding the culture they had come from and how they fit into what was already known about the region, the writing of the Bible, and the history of the tribes involved


  3. Dan Dan says:

    Essentially a brief background on the discovery, procurement, and study of the Dead Sea Scrolls followed by the constructed narrative and context surrounding the Qumran community that likely wrote and studied them Of note were Allegro s attempts at drawing parallels between the scrolls and John the Baptist, Jesus, and early Christians in one chapter, despite in the final chapter claiming that it is too early to draw parallels between the scrolls and John the Baptist, etc., etc Although there i Essentially a brief background on the discovery, procurement, and study of the Dead Sea Scrolls followed by the constructed narrative and context surrounding the Qumran community that likely wrote and studied them Of note were Allegro s attempts at drawing parallels between the scrolls and John the Baptist, Jesus, and early Christians in one chapter, despite in the final chapter claiming that it is too early to draw parallels between the scrolls and John the Baptist, etc., etc Although there is a noticeable tinge of disdain for Jews and, particularly, Christians in his writing, it is still an excellent book about the history of the scrolls themselves


  4. Rachel Grepke Rachel Grepke says:

    First of all, anytime there is excavation for archeological finds, it is way cool The author expelled the finding process of the scrolls well Other than that, it is quite easy to get lost in this book, and I do not mean that in a good way There are somethings that are over explained and others not explained enough One good bonus was the maps and pictures included to help you piece it all together.


  5. Matthew Marks Matthew Marks says:

    Stumbled across an original from 1956 in a book store real cheap Swagged it Really good read Thorough account of the discovery, purchase and restoration of the scrolls I understand the author went on to make further conclusions about Christianity due to his work I ve got one of his other books lined up to find out.


  6. Stuart Stuart says:

    Loved it I know very little about this period of history or the obscurities of sect life within Judaism under occupation, but this seems like a delightful introduction to me Popped my brain every so often, especially in relation to John The Baptist s possible early life trajectory.


  7. Justin Justin says:

    Keeping up with the real Indiana Joneses.


  8. Michael Joosten Michael Joosten says:

    Allegro s The Dead Sea Scrolls is a little uneven, listing from a thrilling account of the scrolls discovery to a solid historical account of the 1st Century history out of which them emerge to rather dry, quotation full looks at their contents and the parallels they have with early Christian writings Allegro s strength is his deep, personal knowledge of his subject this is a man who knows the individuals involved.


  9. Matthew Matthew says:

    Fascinating Intriguing Exciting Helpful for understanding Biblical translation s Historical Helpful for understanding what the Dead Sea Scrolls were about, and why they are so important to Biblical authenticity, accuracy, and historicity.


  10. Mark Mark says:

    B interesting if now somewhat dated.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *