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10 thoughts on “Woede

  1. BlackOxford BlackOxford says:

    Eat Me, AmericaAnger, unaccountable, existentially driven, psychologically depressing, non directive anger is the subject matter of Fury It is anger without a source and without any definite object, pure anger at being alive It is anger that cannot be assuaged by apology or bought off by restitution If one were religious, it might be directed toward God in a Job like tirade But in an atheist like Solly Solanka it can only be bottled up and leak out unexpectedly for the most trivial reason.So Eat Me, AmericaAnger, unaccountable, existentially driven, psychologically depressing, non directive anger is the subject matter of Fury It is anger without a source and without any definite object, pure anger at being alive It is anger that cannot be assuaged by apology or bought off by restitution If one were religious, it might be directed toward God in a Job like tirade But in an atheist like Solly Solanka it can only be bottled up and leak out unexpectedly for the most trivial reason.Solly, a cosmopolitan native of the sub continent, is aware of his paradoxical situation He has no reason to be angry yet he is This makes him angrier still The world is alien to him Not just the people but also the architecture, the food, the culture Everything irritates him from the insane chat of the cleaning lady to the trivialities of the gossip mags Every comment, every sound, every person grates He knows it s his fault, not theirs But does that really matter Solly collects dolls In fact he made a fortune through dolls not by collecting but by creating a best selling one called Little Brain His commercial success has allowed him to bail from his academic Cambridge donnery dondom donnage to join the New York glitterati as a media luvvie This is somewhat strange because one of the few things that Solly knows he is really, really angry about is America He hates its foreign policies, its garish superficiality, its casual racism, its self satisfied neediness to make anything worthwhile in the world into a commodity it owns.Solly has escaped Europe precisely because of what America isAmerica is the great devourer, and so I have come to America to be devoured,he says His anger is not even noticed in America where everyone is angry about something, and where there are even people like him who are angry about everything Solly is in his element the pseudo sophisticated sham of the Manhattan bien pensant baroque culture of death He doesn t want to be a part of this culture, he wants to be consumed by it as a response to his own self disgust.Unfortunately all this anger goes nowhere It is never explained or resolved but peters out in an unfortunate and sordid set of romances Kingsley Amis s Money coveredor less the same ground but with much less hoopla and name dropping As an almost prophetic statement of the psychological situation of the world just prior to 9 11, I suppose it has merit But as a novel it s a collection of snappy lines and even snappier digs that goes nowhere.


  2. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Absolutely terrible I detested it immensely Probably the worst novel I ve ever read Got hold of a pre owned copy for only 50p and still felt completely ripped off Can t see myself reading Rushdie again, unless I m paid to do so.


  3. Fabian Fabian says:

    My first brush with Salman Rushdie proved to be, frankly, uneventful perhaps like my experience with Coetzee s Disgrace , sorta, kinda He writes of this fury, born of long injustice, beside which his own unpredictable temper was a thing of pathetic insignificance, the indulgence, perhaps, of a privileged individual with too much self interest This is what happens when a man accumulates too much wealth having ideas which blow up to become global phenomenons hopefully not an autobiographica My first brush with Salman Rushdie proved to be, frankly, uneventful perhaps like my experience with Coetzee s Disgrace , sorta, kinda He writes of this fury, born of long injustice, beside which his own unpredictable temper was a thing of pathetic insignificance, the indulgence, perhaps, of a privileged individual with too much self interest This is what happens when a man accumulates too much wealth having ideas which blow up to become global phenomenons hopefully not an autobiographical theme for Rushdie Why are writers with so much fame becoming so self aware of it exploit this to the fullest in their works Guess I m still enchanted with that now mythical figure of the penniless artist Coetzee, Rushdie, McEwan, Cunningham they all write about the rich folk having feelings too Another thing if you have not familiarized yourself with mythology well enough, this novel may become murky, blurry Why are narrators so cranial nowadays Not everything goes back to ancient Greece, that story of a lucky individual can never become globalized that is too fake an anecdote, almost elitist too unfortunate a plot to undertake with brilliant, neat prose Plus hearing about the Zeitgeist from an older British gent, his take on post millennium Americana, is not as riveting as, say, ANY GIVEN TOKEN U.S TEEN s daily diary confessions


  4. Lisa Lisa says:

    I know that when people pull apart, they usually employ misunderstanding as a weapon, deliberately getting hold of the stick s wrong end, impaling themselves on its point in order to prove the perfidy of the other With each day that passes, the world matches this novelaccurately The fury of the word is mirrored in the fury of the world Read it, all of you out there who surprisedly find yourselves increasingly, undyingly furious at what happens around you, in this poor world of plenty I know that when people pull apart, they usually employ misunderstanding as a weapon, deliberately getting hold of the stick s wrong end, impaling themselves on its point in order to prove the perfidy of the other With each day that passes, the world matches this novelaccurately The fury of the word is mirrored in the fury of the world Read it, all of you out there who surprisedly find yourselves increasingly, undyingly furious at what happens around you, in this poor world of plenty Who else could possibly describe the complexity of primal anger That must be the topic that was created only for Salman Rushdie, his custom made story, assembled and ready to put on paper by a global rage unseen and unheard of before His to find words for The most frightening part is the publication date Were we really that far gone already in 2001, on the day before 9 11 Read this novel now, it is getting better and better, the clearer it becomes that Rushdie was right sadly.Shared fury is fury well channelled


  5. Dustin Dustin says:

    An irredeemable piece of garbage Sloppy and uninteresting, filled with trite observations and vapid, transparent characters bumbling around in a lame social satire that amounts to nothing deeper or insightful than whatever you and your friends might say about celebrity culture while watching Entertainment Tonight For instance Celebrity s are stupid There areimportant things in the world Hey, you re Salman Rushdie Even Rushdie s lauded language can t get him out of the stink pit h An irredeemable piece of garbage Sloppy and uninteresting, filled with trite observations and vapid, transparent characters bumbling around in a lame social satire that amounts to nothing deeper or insightful than whatever you and your friends might say about celebrity culture while watching Entertainment Tonight For instance Celebrity s are stupid There areimportant things in the world Hey, you re Salman Rushdie Even Rushdie s lauded language can t get him out of the stink pit he dug himself into here, because his virtuosity is, in reality, verbosity, and his extended metaphors only serve his own obnoxious, pompous voice and idiot characters rather than any kind of compelling narrative I only finished this book because I was on an island in the Philippines I would have thrown it into the ocean but for my respect of the Filipino people and oceans in general.I had forgotten how much I hated this book until I saw it on my shelf this morning Seeing it there, eating up valuable space, I began to hate myself terribly But still not as much as I hate this book


  6. Lit Bug Lit Bug says:

    I d known before I picked this up that Fury was one of his critically most damned works despite that warning, I gaily went ahead Because I m simply in love with the genius of that man Of the 4 works I ve read of his, my reactions have ranged from ever growing adoration The Moor s Last Sigh, which I ve read 9 times in 4 years and will read yet again to reluctant reading The Satanic Verses, which has some nuggets of pure brilliance and heady defiance in an otherwise dump of garbage But I d known before I picked this up that Fury was one of his critically most damned works despite that warning, I gaily went ahead Because I m simply in love with the genius of that man Of the 4 works I ve read of his, my reactions have ranged from ever growing adoration The Moor s Last Sigh, which I ve read 9 times in 4 years and will read yet again to reluctant reading The Satanic Verses, which has some nuggets of pure brilliance and heady defiance in an otherwise dump of garbage But never have I encountered such a disastrous piece of fiction, especially by him Why do I read RushdieBecause I love his verbal density that draws blood under the garb of comic relief and unapologetic, Bambaiya, forbidden language of lavish absuses Because he deftly weaves complex layers of satire, story telling and colonial history into a multi hued carpet full of motif, signifiers and signs, some of them obscure and some right in your face Because he is irreverent Because nothing is sacred to him Because he boldly says what needs to be said, without mincing his words Because he insults where insults need to be thrown Because he is rude, crude, bitter, sharp, cynical, unbowed, unfettered you cannot control him You cannot deny the truth in his fiction He breathes fire Because he cruelly lifts masks off the Grand Narratives about whoever he picks to star in his works Much of the really beautiful aspects of his works are esoteric they are references that only people really, deeply aware about India can understand, so I m not surprised at non Indians not falling so deeply in love with him.I love people like that who break taboos, who make me swallow the bitter tinged filth of my identity when I open my mouth to laugh hard at his explicit expletive laden language Because his language is not just a gimmick to shock and scandalize read between the lines, and there is bitter, biting sarcasm, political satire, loads of historical cultural references, psychological insights into the era of the setting, the numerous popular culture references crucial to the shaping of that time It is a rich, rich tapestry that is clever, deep and entertaining And to many conservatives, shamelessly offensive And I love that.But none of it this time This is not the Rushdie I know and adore It s almost like a ghost writer penning a Rushdie lookalike, a dummy writer forging a pseudo Rushdie and failing miserably This book has no charm, no intriguing layers of history, culture, political commentary, vivid picturing of people, places and their fetishes Where every single line had a meaning, a reference, a significance in his other works, entire paragraphs here serve to do nothing but fill empty pages It is like someone ate away all the luscious cream from my chocolate truffle gateau, leaving only the plain sponge behind, mocking me with the erasure.In a word, it is bland, tasteless, almost unmemorable The only time I caught a faint flicker of Rushdie was at the end of Chapter 9 where he attacked an extremely unpleasant aspect of Gandhi every Indian has either chosen to overlook or furiously deny and forgetLike Gandhi performing his brahmacharya celibacy experiments of truth , when the wives of his friends lay with him at night to enable him to test the mastery of mind over limb, he Solanka preserved the outward form of high propriety and so did she, so did she The narrative is extremely disinterested, even if the change in trademark Rushdie style is admitted it just doesn t connect with the reader Unlike some of his other works, this has neither content, nor style Solanka s motivations, even towards the end, seem plain unbelievable Eleanor s sudden appearance, Neela s sacrifice, everything, in fact, seem too dry and contrived The only reason I did not lem this book was that I wanted to know if this ceaseless criticism on the book was justified, or if it was plain unacceptance of any methodological deviance from the signature Rushdie style.All I can say is that it was well deserved, and I m not going to waste my time dwelling on what already other reviewers have pointed out Off to something better


  7. Esra Esra says:

    Rushdie wants us to see the fury inside the main character Solanka, but what we see is basically, a 55 year old man abandoning his wife and kid without saying a word because he was afraid he would hurt them , moving to NYC, having an affair with a quite young and attractive neighbour, and then dumping her as well for an incredibly beautiful also young woman.


  8. Georgia Georgia says:

    What lies dormant beneath our skin waiting to rise up and destroy us and the world around us What demons do we push deep into our bellies and hope to forget only to have them claw their way out in a new form The truth is that the raw emotion that we curtail can lead to our salvation.


  9. Lynne Lynne says:

    If you are a fan of the band Neutral Milk Hotel and or Rock Plaza Central, you re familiar with the way some of the songs descend into a glorious cacophonous mess at the end similar to The Beatles song A Day in the Life What seems to be a chaotic aural blend of instrumentation somehow works it s pleasing to the ear When I started Salman Rushdie s Fury, I had the same hope for it, that somehow the jumbled chaos of characters, settings, and events would evolve into a story not simply unders If you are a fan of the band Neutral Milk Hotel and or Rock Plaza Central, you re familiar with the way some of the songs descend into a glorious cacophonous mess at the end similar to The Beatles song A Day in the Life What seems to be a chaotic aural blend of instrumentation somehow works it s pleasing to the ear When I started Salman Rushdie s Fury, I had the same hope for it, that somehow the jumbled chaos of characters, settings, and events would evolve into a story not simply understandable but beautiful, and not beautiful in spite of its flaws but because of them Unfortunately, I couldn t have beenwrong.Rushdie s exegesis on the supposed furies that we all feel hinges on his protagonist, Malik Solanka, an Indian philosophy professor who previously lived in England but moved to The Big Apple when he suddenly found himself standing over his wife and children with a carving knife He became famous in England for making dolls, specifically one called Little Brain, a little girl puppet who interviews famous philosophers The show became a huge success, Solanka sells out to commercial producers, and this ultimately leads to his fury Oh, and did I mention that he drinks A lot He s not the most likable fellow on whom to pin a story not that protagonists need to be likable look at Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky, hell, almost anything by an Eastern European author , but they do need to be engrossing and, sadly, Solanka just isn t Indeed, every character in this book is simply a cardboard cutout Lifeless and un interesting And then there are the numerous sub plots the murders of NYC women for example that are never completely realized or related to Solanka, so I question what they are even doing in the story.I understand that this is supposed to be satirical, that Rushdie is poking fun at contemporary American life among the intellectual and the wealthy I also understand that he is playing with our conception of the furies female spirits of justice and vengeance of ancient Greek and Roman mythology Life is fury Fury sexual, oedipal, political, magical, brutal drives us to our finest heights and coarsest depths This is what we are, what we civilize ourselves to disguise the terrifying human animal in us, the exalted, transcendent, self destructive, untrammeled lord of creation We raise each other to the heights of joy We tear each other limb from bloody limb, Solanka says However, good satire is supposed to expose certain profound truths about its subjects, and I don t think Rushdie does this with any success He doesn t make us feel for his characters in fact, the entire story strikes me as a bit misogynistic , and he doesn t make us want to investigate what he is mocking Don t peg me as a Rushdie hater I loved Midnight s Children But this definitely does not do for New York what Midnight s Children did for Bombay This is a different Rushdie this Rushdie has embraced certain critics views of his work, the critics who praise him for doing things with style and language that no one else can accomplish and say that this makes up for his somewhat loose grip on plot and character development It s almost as if he took these reviews as a personal challenge to see how far he could go before readers noticed that he s just fucking with us And the result sucks


  10. Deea Deea says:

    While reading the first chapters of this book, I felt like highlighting every line The sentences were so nicely constructed and the turn of phrases made each line delightful I thought the whole book would be like this, but it wasn t.This is not my first Rushdie and ever since I read Shalimar the Clown my first book by Rushdie which was amazing, I hoped that I would find at least one of his books as good as this one So far, I haven t Not even Midnight Children was at the height of my ex While reading the first chapters of this book, I felt like highlighting every line The sentences were so nicely constructed and the turn of phrases made each line delightful I thought the whole book would be like this, but it wasn t.This is not my first Rushdie and ever since I read Shalimar the Clown my first book by Rushdie which was amazing, I hoped that I would find at least one of his books as good as this one So far, I haven t Not even Midnight Children was at the height of my expectations It was a very good book, but at some points also very annoying.Fury starts like a masterpiece and turns into a total crap I try to finish all the books I start as I truly think there must be something good in them, something that I would enjoy, and I also got through all this book, but it was quite an effort to be attentive until the end If it weren t for the beginning which was quite striking, I wouldn t give this book 2 stars


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Woede ➦ [Ebook] ➡ Woede By Salman Rushdie ➱ – Thomashillier.co.uk Thema van de Boekenweek is Het land van herkomst met als ondertitel Schrijven tussen twee culturen Het Boekenweekgeschenk is dit jaar van een buitenlandse auteur, de bekende schrijver Salman Rushdie Thema van de Boekenweekis Het land van herkomst met als ondertitel Schrijven tussen twee culturen Het Boekenweekgeschenk is dit jaar van een buitenlandse auteur, de bekende schrijver Salman Rushdie Het is een caleidoscopische roman die een actueel portret schetst van een leven aan het begin van het derde millennium, van een wereldstad in een tijd van schijnbaar eindeloze welvaart, die paradoxaal ook een tijd is van dorheid in het dagelijkse bestaan van veel mensen.

  • Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • Woede
  • Salman Rushdie
  • Dutch
  • 09 September 2019
  • 9074336639

About the Author: Salman Rushdie

Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a novelist and essayist Much of his early fiction is set at least partly on the Indian subcontinent His style is often classified as magical realism, while a dominant theme of his work is the story of the many connections, disruptions and migrations between the Eastern and Western worldHis fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, led to protests from Muslims in several countries, some of which were violent Faced with death threats and a fatwa religious edict issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran, which called for him to be killed, he spent nearly a decade largely underground, appearing in public only sporadically In June , he was appointed a Knight Bachelor for services to literature , which thrilled and humbled him In , he began a five year term as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emory University.