Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really


Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are ➿ Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are Free ➶ Author Andrew Olendzki – Thomashillier.co.uk Untangling Self invites us to see nonself, interdependence, and mindfulness as rational, real world solutions to the human condition of sufferingIn psychologically rich essays that equally probe tradi Untangling A Buddhist Investigation of MOBI :↠ Self invites us A Buddhist MOBI õ to see nonself, interdependence, and mindfulness as rational, real world solutions to the Untangling Self: PDF/EPUB ² human condition of sufferingIn psychologically rich essays that equally probe traditional Buddhist thought and contemporary issues, Andrew Olendzki Self: A Buddhist Kindle Õ helps us to reconcile ancient Buddhist thought with our day to day life His writing is sophisticated and engaged, filled with memorable imagery and insight drawn from decades of study, reflection, and meditation on Buddhist teachings Seasoned Buddhist readers and anyone interested in the intellectual heart of Buddhism will find this collection of fascinating essays rewarding.

    Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really engaged, filled with memorable imagery and insight drawn from decades of study, reflection, and meditation on Buddhist teachings Seasoned Buddhist readers and anyone interested in the intellectual heart of Buddhism will find this collection of fascinating essays rewarding."/>
  • Paperback
  • 200 pages
  • Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are
  • Andrew Olendzki
  • 09 April 2019
  • 1614293007

About the Author: Andrew Olendzki

Is A Buddhist Investigation of MOBI :↠ a well known A Buddhist MOBI õ author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Untangling Self: PDF/EPUB ² Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are book, this is one of the most wanted Self: A Buddhist Kindle Õ Andrew Olendzki author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are

  1. Tom Tom says:

    In this, his second book, the Buddhist scholar Andrew Olendzki has once again gathered a collection of short, previously published articles, grouped them by topic into logically coherent chapters, and framed the entire collection between a pair of longer, newly written essays that introduce and conclude the book And once again, he has so skillfully woven everything together into a unified narrative flow that, were it not for his acknowledgements to the various magazines and journals where these In this, his second book, the Buddhist scholar Andrew Olendzki has once again gathered a collection of short, previously published articles, grouped them by topic into logically coherent chapters, and framed the entire collection between a pair of longer, newly written essays that introduce and conclude the book And once again, he has so skillfully woven everything together into a unified narrative flow that, were it not for his acknowledgements to the various magazines and journals where these essays originally appeared, we would scarcely be aware that the entire book has been carefully stitched together from pieces originally written to stand on their own merits.Where this new volume differs from and quite possibly improves upon its excellent predecessor, Unlimiting Mind, is in itsfocused approach Rather than the broad survey of Buddhist thought that Olendzki treated his readers to in that first book, Untangling Self takes us instead on a deep dive of exploration into one of Buddhism s most challenging teachings, the concept of nonself.Olendzki begins by helping us to better understand what we mean when we talk about self And this is where the book s intriguing title comes into play He describes the self as a continuously created and constantly changing narrative that we make up as we proceed through our lives, driven by our never ending desire for pleasant events and aversion to unpleasant ones The reality of our lives gets tangled up, so to speak, in these stories we tell ourselves The self Olendzki aims to untangle for his readers is the grasping, clinging self that each of us constructs out of our day to day experiences, and that Buddhism identifies as the root cause of all suffering One of his key insights about suffering is how it stems not from what you want, but from the very fact that you want A world of wisdom is distilled in that tweet ready phrase.Another powerful insight comes from Olendzki s view that self isproperly considered as a verb rather than as a noun Here s a brief sample of what he has to say on this topic Grasping is not something done by the self rather, self is something done by grasping In the moment of trying to hold on to what is continually slipping away or of trying to push away what is relentlessly arising, a self is conjured up The self can only exist as a fleeting attitude toward experience It arises and passes away as relentlessly as everything else Once we begin to understand self in this manner, we canreadily start to comprehend nonself as a non grasping approach to experience one which brings with it the possibility of equanimity, and the promise that Buddhism hold out to all practitioners, the possibility of the cessation of suffering.That promise may well take a lifetime of practice Reading this book will almost certainly prove to be the perfect place to start

  2. retroj retroj says:

    Buddhist philosophy has been my favorite reading topic for a while now, and Untangling Self by Andrew Olendzki is another awesome read It is definitely on the analytical end of the spectrum of Buddhist books, and that s my favorite end of the spectrum.

  3. Ionia Ionia says:

    I think, if you stop trying to find the exact point in this book and hold it to that standard, it suddenly seems very useful This book might be about untangling self, but for many who have not yet divined what they believe self is, it can be awfully confusing Still, if you take a look at this book as a whole, it has a lot of very good advice for looking at the world through a Buddhist lens If you can come into this book with an open mind and relax when you read it, the advice becomes much cle I think, if you stop trying to find the exact point in this book and hold it to that standard, it suddenly seems very useful This book might be about untangling self, but for many who have not yet divined what they believe self is, it can be awfully confusing Still, if you take a look at this book as a whole, it has a lot of very good advice for looking at the world through a Buddhist lens If you can come into this book with an open mind and relax when you read it, the advice becomes much clearer Once I was fully engaged with this book, I felt like I learned a lot from the examples that the author gave Over all, I thought this was a helpful book with a lot to offer the reader This review is based on a complementary copy from the publisher, provided through Netgalley All opinions are my own

  4. Andrew Andrew says:

    Bounced into reading this as it was quoted favourably in Anneka Harris Conscious Unfortunately only the introduction and conclusion are worth reading These offer an interesting expression of the concept of nonself in way which aligns with what we know fromneuroscience and psychology The rest is somewhat dire while I can read some Buddhist philosophy psychology I can only hold interest while it remains tethered to empirical observation, even if that is only through introspection But whe Bounced into reading this as it was quoted favourably in Anneka Harris Conscious Unfortunately only the introduction and conclusion are worth reading These offer an interesting expression of the concept of nonself in way which aligns with what we know fromneuroscience and psychology The rest is somewhat dire while I can read some Buddhist philosophy psychology I can only hold interest while it remains tethered to empirical observation, even if that is only through introspection But when arguments rest on the authority of differing interpretations of pali words or texts I feel like I am being invited to do something similar to speculating on the of angel bearing capacity of a pinhead If Buddhism has anything to offer it is because a admittedly special individual hit upon, through extraordinary introspection, some truth about human nature, and about reality If it really is true then it remains so undercontemporary observation, and it seems quite silly picking over ancient texts expecting evergranular detail to be revelatory Not for me

  5. Brock Ray Brock Ray says:

    Should probably be 4 and a half stars Great insights into Buddhism and it s relationship to modern neuropsychology Just don t try to read it when you re tired, or you might start to nod off Lots of big, deep ideas here.

  6. Joe Joe says:

    Fantastically well, and clearly, written collection of essays for such a complex topic Would recommend having some familiarity with Buddhist thought before reading though.

  7. Sandra Sandra says:

    A challenging read Unfortunately, I didn t make it through to the end.

  8. Kathy Kathy says:

    Though I tried to follow the thought process expressed by Andrew Olendzki in Untangling Self, I just couldn t seem to catch on Admittedly, I was attempting to read this during a difficult week, and my mind was seeking rest I ll give it another try at a later date to see if it makes a difference, but as of right now, this book just wasn t for me.Many thanks to NetGalley and Wisdom Publications for allowing me to read and review this book.

  9. Shelley Hainer Shelley Hainer says:

    A wonderful book that in clear language extrapolates the Buddha s teaching on non self Andy uses poet express and simple language to deconstruct the teachings making them easily accessible and understandable It is inspiring to read and experience the moment to moment path of awakening in this finely crafted work.

  10. Fred Hatch Fred Hatch says:

    So introspective as to be uselessI loved Olendzki s first book However if one attempted to live a life based on the convoluted thinking that is presented here, his her life would likely grind to a halt with constant, critical self evaluation.

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