Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship


Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution ❮Reading❯ ➽ Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution ➶ Author David A. Clary – Thomashillier.co.uk They were unlikely comrades in arms One was a self taught, middle aged Virginia planter in charge of a ragtag army of revolutionaries, the other a rich, glory seeking teenage French aristocrat But the They were unlikely comrades in arms One was Washington, Lafayette, Epub à a self taught, middle aged Virginia planter in charge of a ragtag army of revolutionaries, the other a rich, glory seeking teenage French aristocrat But the childless Washington and the orphaned Lafayette forged a bond between them as strong as any between father and son It was an unbreakable trust that saw them through betrayals, shifting political alliances, and the trials of warLafayette came to America Adopted Son: PDF or a rebellious youth whose defiance of his king made him a celebrity in France His money and connections attracted the favor of the Continental Congress, which advised Washington to keep the exuberant Marquis from getting himself killed But when the boy general was wounded in his first battle, he became a hero of two countries As the war ground on, Washington found in his young charge the makings of a courageous and talented commander whose Son: Washington, Lafayette, Epub Û loyalty, generosity, and eagerness to please his Commander in Chief made him one of the war s most effective and inspired generals Lafayette s hounding of Cornwallis s army was the perfect demonstration of Washington s unconventional bush fighting tactics, and led to the British surrender at YorktownTheir friendship continued throughout their lives Lafayette inspired widespread French support for a struggling young America and personally influenced Washington s antislavery views Washington s enduring example as general and statesman guided Lafayette during France s own revolution years laterUsing personal letters and other key historical documents, Adopted Son offers a rare glimpse of the American Revolution through the friendship between Washington and Lafayette It offers dramatic accounts of battles and intimate portraits of such major figures as Alexander Hamilton, Benedict Arnold, and Benjamin Franklin The result is a remarkable, little known epic of friendship, revolution, and the birth of a nation From the Hardcover edition.


10 thoughts on “Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution

  1. Bárbara Bárbara says:

    I can t believe it s over I m super emo right now Also it s 1.17am and I m hella tired RTC after I ve slept a bit but THIS WAS SO WONDERFUL Which, If you paid attention to my updates, you must know by now I WILL MISS READING THIS BOOK SO FUCKING MUCH.UPDATE APRIL 28THOkay It took me almost two weeks really, it s been that long WOW I mean WOW , but I m emotionally ready now Why now Because I m currently reading one version of Lafayette s memoires and I m disappointed at the editor I can t believe it s over I m super emo right now Also it s 1.17am and I m hella tired RTC after I ve slept a bit but THIS WAS SO WONDERFUL Which, If you paid attention to my updates, you must know by now I WILL MISS READING THIS BOOK SO FUCKING MUCH.UPDATE APRIL 28THOkay It took me almost two weeks really, it s been that long WOW I mean WOW , but I m emotionally ready now Why now Because I m currently reading one version of Lafayette s memoires and I m disappointed at the editor AND IT S MAKING ME MISS THIS BOOK SO DAMN MUCH This book was wonderful It had a certain warmth that I didn t know a historical book biography type could have Not only this book was impressively researched and I mean BADASS research like you can t believe don t trust me 25% of the book IS JUST THE CITATION OF THE SOURCES FOR THE INVESTIGATION That s right the actual story finishes at roughly 75% , but even though it tells the story of a historical figure, it s not disgustingly glorifying of it True, it shows SOME bias, but it s not in an ass kissing manner Which is fantastic There s one extra reason why I loved this so much though, and this is strictly due to personal fanservice I don t know how else to call it even though this book dealt in its majority with the relationship of Lafayette and Washington and had some dedication to the relationships of Lafayette and other figures , I was beyond ecstatic to find lots of unexpected content about one of the most elusive from my perspective figures, and one I m always growinginterested in Eyeroll please no, I didn t mean drumroll, I did mean eyeroll cause that s what y all be doing when I say the name, if you haven t already guessed it which, shame on you if you haven t cause he s all over my updates JOHN LAURENS I was pleasantly surprised and even occasionally teary eyed, don t laugh to find him mentioned as often He even was mentionedoften than Alexander Hamilton, mind you So yeah Well, if I loved this book so damn much, how come I m not giving it 5 stars, you d ask Isn t John Laurens alone worth 5 stars You d ask he s worth that and so much , and you know it cut the stupid questions The reason I m lowering the rating is a because even though I enjoyed this a TON, I still found myself getting a bit not so invested when the story delved into Washington s early years or when it went deep into detail about secondary characters as much as I loved Les Mis, I didn t appreciate Hugo s tendency to devote pages and pages to things he could have solved in a paragraph or two, and this was sort of like that in certain cases.and b the other reason as stupid as it may be, I don t care is because, yes, while this book is incredibly researched and impressively well edited, there s a paragraph near the beginning where Lafayette is said to have blue eyes, and not a page later he s said to have hazel eyes or something something not blue, definitely So which is it The world may never know Okay, mild, minor complaints aside, though, the fact remains that I LOVED this book, and that it will be the element I will always find myself measuring other books about Lafayette with In two words READ IT


  2. Kelsey Kelsey says:

    In all actuality, 3.5 stars And I apologize in advance for this review because there is no way that I can accurately describe the love these two men shared for each other, and the way that affected me.Ok, so even though this wasn t my favorite book of all time, I m sad that I finally finished it I m going to miss my daily dose of the Marquis He was just so adorable and funny At many points I laughed out loud reading about the things he had said or done.Anyway, to jump into the real review In all actuality, 3.5 stars And I apologize in advance for this review because there is no way that I can accurately describe the love these two men shared for each other, and the way that affected me.Ok, so even though this wasn t my favorite book of all time, I m sad that I finally finished it I m going to miss my daily dose of the Marquis He was just so adorable and funny At many points I laughed out loud reading about the things he had said or done.Anyway, to jump into the real review This was tremendously researched, and I learned so many things about Washington, Lafayette, and the revolution that I had never known before For example, the French flag that flies today is because of Lafayette He was also one of the first abolitionists, and somewhat persuaded Washington to become one as well Clary also did an excellent job of delivering what the title promised the relationship between Washington and the Marquis Their relationship was one built on extreme love and devotion, and that was palpable Clary also gave background on the two men, giving them each a chapter in the beginning to discuss their upbringings and childhoods, and what led them to the revolution in the first place Extremely detailed and documented, I myself feel like I am an authority on Washington and the boy general.However, there were also things that I didn t like as well The Marquis had many mistresses, but Clary described them as something to be conquered He especially used this word when describing Agla du Hunolstein, who the Marquis had been trying to woo for years When she did become his mistress, Clary wrote that Lafayette had finally conquered her Apparently, women are prizes to Clary.Going along with this, two young women at different points, one about 17 and the other in her early 20 s or so, in Lafayette s later years, became attached to him, and called him their father Clary notes that these relationships were strange, even though the other 451 pages are about Lafayette calling Washington his adoptive father My biggest complaint though was the fact that, at the end, when Washington passed away, Clary never writes about the Marquis and how he felt All he said was that he was in mourning I wanted to know how the Marquis handled it His father basically passed away and Lafayette couldn t be with him, or write to him ever again and that s all he ever did, was write him letters and we don t get any mention of how he handled this, whatsoever I felt almost cheated by that.Other than that, the writing was extremely dense, and multiple times throughout the book I would drift off and would have to read an entire page again This is understandable though, because Clary is an historian, so his writing is academic.With all of this being said though, Clary did a great job with adding emotion to the book, and by the time I ended it, I had a few tears in my eyes The love these two men shared was really the heart of this book, and, like Clary says at the end, even though these men are considered heroes, they really were just men who, in Washington s case, was childless and looking for a son, and found that in the young Marquis, and in Lafayette s case, he was looking for someone who could teach him and give him guidance and assurance, and he found that with Washington Overall, I did like this book, and I recommend it to anyone wanting to knowabout these two men On a side note, there needs to be tons of books written about the Marquis wife, Adrienne What a woman Devoted to her husband, she never said anything about his mistresses, never complained whenever he went to America, never complained when he barely paid any attention to her, took over all the Marquis matters with his land, and when imprisoned, fought tooth and nail to get him free When that didn t happen, she lived in the prison with him, refusing to leave At the end, on her death bed, all she wanted to know is if she made a good wife for the Marquis, and knowing that she did, died happy She was a powerhouse and the world needs to learn that


  3. Lauren Lauren says:

    Okay, this is one of my favorite historical relationships of all time, and two of my favorite figures, and I m trying not to let my emotions about them overshadow me objectively reviewing the book SoThe pacing timeline is a little tedious in this one There s a lot of focus on the years Lafayette served in the American Revolution, while his early years and later years arebrushed over I also felt the book, if it was meant to be centered around specifically the relationship between L Okay, this is one of my favorite historical relationships of all time, and two of my favorite figures, and I m trying not to let my emotions about them overshadow me objectively reviewing the book SoThe pacing timeline is a little tedious in this one There s a lot of focus on the years Lafayette served in the American Revolution, while his early years and later years arebrushed over I also felt the book, if it was meant to be centered around specifically the relationship between Laf and Washington, brought in too many other historical figures, which muddled things a bit It s necessary for context, I suppose, but not every single other general needs to be mentioned by the wayside Washington is also skimmed overthan Lafayette the book is simply very Lafayette centric, which was just fine It gets sentimental at times, injecting emotions and terms of endearment that I m sure the particular subjects wouldn t mind, but for the reader who likes a purely factual text this might not do it for you I liked it, though This would probably be only three stars, but the last three pages were so quotable and intense that it elevated the whole book for me I also appreciated the various portraits and asides throughout the bookthey were not carved monuments in real life They were people, with all the strengths and weaknesses of that species They started out as children, as we all do They grew up, and changed, and did some amazing things, and made mistakes Who they were cannot be measured only by how much they shook the world


  4. Jerome Jerome says:

    I enjoyed Clary s history of the Mexican American war, and this book was just as good Clary tells the story of the friendship between Washington and Lafayette, and how Washington became a father figure to Lafayette The book doesn t really tell the story of Lafayette s contribution to the war effort, or at least not as well.The book is quite lively, and the story of Lafayette, the teenage general who constantly disobeyed the orders of his French superiors in his quest for glory, is well told L I enjoyed Clary s history of the Mexican American war, and this book was just as good Clary tells the story of the friendship between Washington and Lafayette, and how Washington became a father figure to Lafayette The book doesn t really tell the story of Lafayette s contribution to the war effort, or at least not as well.The book is quite lively, and the story of Lafayette, the teenage general who constantly disobeyed the orders of his French superiors in his quest for glory, is well told Lafayette was not so much a proponent of American liberty as he was a youthful glory hunter eager for a chance to fight the British Lafayette was always looking for a fight Whenever there was no fighting to be had, Lafayette considered quitting Washington, on the other hand, was not as glory obsessed, but had a short temper and a disregard for the feelings of others, except when it came to Lafayette The marquis was not a dedicated republican, although he later revised his early life to make it appear so.Clary does a great job showing how much they trusted each other Lafayette was impulsive and seeking glory, but he almost blindly obeyed Washington s orders, even when he did not know their purpose Like Washington, Lafayette was a Freemason, and often connected with American Masonic lodges We also get a good portrait of the love between Lafayette and his wife Adrienne who surprised many A French lady and fond of her husband Abigail Adams remarked.Sometimes, Clary s focus on their friendship seems excessive, as the book is filled with mushy excerpts from letters they wrote to each other Still, a very interesting and well written book


  5. Chrissy Chrissy says:

    Excellent book Highly recommended.


  6. Marian Snowe Marian Snowe says:

    This book was amazing It used really interesting primary sources to describe Washington and Lafayette s close relationship, and the narrative voice was so readable It read like a story with tons of quotes from the actual players the lives of these two men I ll keep various sections bookmarked to go read again


  7. Robert Krenzel Robert Krenzel says:

    Adopted son is a readable and well researched account of the life of Lafayette, on of the best known but least appreciated generals of the American Revolution.The author clearly did his work in sorting out the background that enabled Washington and Lafayette to come together and develop a life long bond that shaped both the American and French Revolutions His insights are fascinating.The book suffers a bit from the heavy reliance on letters between Washington and Lafayette While they do offer Adopted son is a readable and well researched account of the life of Lafayette, on of the best known but least appreciated generals of the American Revolution.The author clearly did his work in sorting out the background that enabled Washington and Lafayette to come together and develop a life long bond that shaped both the American and French Revolutions His insights are fascinating.The book suffers a bit from the heavy reliance on letters between Washington and Lafayette While they do offer insights into the writers frames of mind, they get a bit tedious I also felt the book found itself adrift after Washington s death the theme of Lafayette doing what he thought Washington would do gets worn a bit thin There are a few negatives, but this is certainly a book worth reading for anyone interested in the American Revolution I certainly came away with a better appreciation for the critical role played by Washington s Adopted Son


  8. Sarah Sarah says:

    I would almost give it four stars, but this is one of those books wherein the author tries a little too hard to make everything fit his central thesis, and in doing so, detracts from his own writing If he d written a littlenaturally, instead of trying to fit everything into a box labelled Lafayette as Washington s adoptive son , it would have made for a better book.Don t get me wrong, I enjoyed this one, and it had its moments of charm, but then the author would sabotage himself by pushi I would almost give it four stars, but this is one of those books wherein the author tries a little too hard to make everything fit his central thesis, and in doing so, detracts from his own writing If he d written a littlenaturally, instead of trying to fit everything into a box labelled Lafayette as Washington s adoptive son , it would have made for a better book.Don t get me wrong, I enjoyed this one, and it had its moments of charm, but then the author would sabotage himself by pushing too hard fit everything under the banner of his thesis It still had a lot of good information, fairly well presented, but it could have been a much better book.I wonder at the fact that I have yet to read a truly excellent Lafayette biography perhaps there is something about him defies modern feeling


  9. Tom Lowe Tom Lowe says:

    As an historian, I have always been fascinated by the adopted father son relationship between Generals Washington and Lafayette This incredible book by David Clary explores, in minute detail, all facets and angles of that relationship that gave birth to the United States and to Revolutionary France Not only does the author explain all that has to be explained, but he makes the reader comprehend and understand the deep love these two historical giants felt for one another This book is extremel As an historian, I have always been fascinated by the adopted father son relationship between Generals Washington and Lafayette This incredible book by David Clary explores, in minute detail, all facets and angles of that relationship that gave birth to the United States and to Revolutionary France Not only does the author explain all that has to be explained, but he makes the reader comprehend and understand the deep love these two historical giants felt for one another This book is extremely well researched, and after I finished it, I walked away knowing that the connection was described in the best possible way Little did I know when I started the book, that this relationship between the two had such an enormous impact on world history I love this book


  10. Robert Gray Robert Gray says:

    Fabulous history plus much muchInsight into management styles, both GW Lafayette Insight into how deep trust can go and how worthy it can prove to be when accurately placed Juxtaposing this with study of Napoleon, which came not long thereafter, provides insight beyond what study of either individually would provide Insight into war strategies and life strategies and a heart warming book to boot Fabulous history plus much muchInsight into management styles, both GW Lafayette Insight into how deep trust can go and how worthy it can prove to be when accurately placed Juxtaposing this with study of Napoleon, which came not long thereafter, provides insight beyond what study of either individually would provide Insight into war strategies and life strategies and a heart warming book to boot


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